The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, June 26, 2015, Image 11

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    COMMUNITY
THE DAILY ASTORIAN • FRIDAY, JUNE 26, 2015
1B
‘I’M NOT GIVING UP’
GO FISH
‘IT’S NOT A TUMOR,’ IT’S A REBOOT
A little more than a year ago, Judy Madson (pictured)
and her husband, Mike, of Seaside, were visiting Innsbruck,
Austria, when Judy came down with what she thought was
a cold — but it rapidly got worse. After an ambulance ride
to the hospital, she was put into a medically induced coma.
“Leaving the hotel is the last thing I remember for the next
six weeks,” Judy recalled.
When Judy finally awoke, Mike explained she’d actual-
ly been sick with bacterial pneumonia. It had spread into
her bloodstream causing sepsis, which triggered lung and
kidney failure — she needed a ventilator and dialysis to
survive, and was given a 5 percent chance to live. The sep-
sis had also interfered with her circulation, and portions of
her hands and legs had to be amputated.
It wasn’t until August that Judy was flown by medical
transport jet back to Oregon Health and Sciences Univer-
sity for a two-month stay, until she could survive without
dialysis. She was then moved to Vibra Specialty Hospital
in Portland for wound care and physical, occupational and
speech therapy. She was also weaned off the ventilator, and
learned to eat and talk again.
The next phase of her recovery was at Avamere Rehab,
where Judy learned how to use prosthetics for her arm and
legs. After a stay at the Rehab Institute of Oregon, almost
a year to the day from when she fell ill, Judy finally went
home to Seaside, a courageous survivor. “I’m not giving
up,” she told her friend, Jan Riggs, “I’m playing golf
again!”
Now that Judy is home, she is in serious need of a hand-
icapped-equipped van so she can get around. Jan has set
up an account at www.gofundme.com/jmadson to try to fill
that need. If you want to contribute, but don’t want to use
the Internet, call Jan at 503-285-5405.
“Please think about Judy’s needs, trying to start a life
over in her own home,” Jan asks. “A handicapped van is a
necessity.” Can you help?
HAVE YOU SEEN JOSEPHINE?
‘M
aybe we aren’t going to get ‘The Goonies 2’ anytime soon
but, maybe we will have to settle for ‘Kindergarten Cop
2!’” Astorian Jerry Olson wrote. The original 1990 movie, shot
mainly in Astoria, starred Arnold Schwarzenegger, who is pictured
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biz411.com (http://tinyurl.com/kincop2), the movie comes from the
same studio, Universal.
Yes, there’s still a kindergarten class, a beautiful teacher and wit-
ness protection in the story line, but major changes are afoot. For
starters, there will be a new director and scriptwriter, an Indian side-
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What there won’t be is Schwarzenegger.
Disappointed? As “Ahnold” says in the original movie, “Oh
come on ... Stop whining!”
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know where to start? The Ear’s knowledge of the sport only
goes as far as Richard Brautigan’s “Trout Fishing in America”
(http://tinyurl.com/braut-trout), which could never remotely be
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However, for you ambitious types who want to learn about
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no less, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has an
ideal solution: A new intensive 14-segment video series, “How
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Don’t let the number of segments scare you off, they’re pretty
short. Pictured, the star of the series, guide Cody Herman, in a
screenshot from one of the videos.
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and actually catch one.
UNHENGED
SNIPPETS
Ca-ching: Did you know that
NerdWallet (no, the Ear did not make
that up) has proclaimed Seaside No.
7 and Astoria No. 9 on its latest list,
“Top 10 Best Places to Start a Busi-
ness in Oregon”?
“NerdWallet examined communi-
ties with at least 5,000 people and more than 500 businesses ranging
in size from sole proprietorships to big companies,” the press release
says. “We analyzed a community’s business climate and local eco-
nomic health based on U.S. Census data.”
Seaside hit the list as the smallest community, but rated because
“nearly 50 percent of businesses in the coastal community have paid
employees — the highest rate among our cities.” NerdWallet also
liked Seaside’s long-term planning project Seaside 2034.
Astoria is deemed notable for being a backdrop for several mov-
ies, which helps “fuel the local tourism industry” and for the “hop-
ping local businesses.”
Basking in the glow: Cannon Beach got some media love
recently, too, when CNN declared it No. 12 of “16 Can’t Miss
AND THE WINNER IS …
As a belated summer solstice offering, the Ear brings
you (ta dah): Fridgehenge. KentOnline of the U.K. (http://
tinyurl.com/UKhenge) reports that while more than 20,000
people made their way to Stonehenge to celebrate the sol-
stice, a hearty 20 souls gathered in Maidstone at Fridghenge,
which is pictured, courtesy of KentOnline.
“I thought it would be a good idea given the solstice was
coming, so I went out at 3 a.m. and built it using about 30
fridges lying around in the yard,” Kevin Wildeman said,
who created metal monument with his colleague, Paul Stone.
“It took about three hours and ... It’s fully bolted down.”
No word on if Fridgehenge will be there for next year’s
solstice, but you could always head for the Stonehenge
Memorial (http://tinyurl.com/maryhenge), in Marysville,
Wash., instead. It is pictured, inset, in a photo by Ben Ca-
nales. Even though the memorial is aligned to the astronom-
ical horizon, not the solstice sunrise, and it’s 3 degrees off
from the original Stonehenge, what’s a few degrees among
friends?
SHE MADE US PROUD
Monte Ramvick’s beloved dog, Josephine (pictured), a
7- to 8-year-old Newfoundland, disappeared from the War-
renton Costco parking lot the afternoon of June 13. Monte
went inside for a short while, leaving Josephine in the back
of his truck. While he was gone, she either got out of the
truck, which would not be normal for her, or was taken out.
A woman, who had Josephine on a rope (it was not Mon-
te’s rope), approached the doorman at the Costco. She ap-
peared to be in her 40s, and had three older children with
her, two boys and a girl. She said she had found Josephine,
and was going to wait for the dog’s owner to come out. If
she couldn’t find the owner, she was going to turn the dog
in to a pound in Washington. Why Washington? Nobody
knows, and she disappeared with Josephine shortly there-
after.
Monte went directly to the Clatsop County Animal Shel-
ter as soon as he realized Josephine was missing, just in
case, but she wasn’t there. She was wearing a purple col-
lar with lots of identifying tags, yet no one has contacted
him. The Warrenton Police Department has put out aflier
(http://tinyurl.com/lost-newfie), and Rita Smith of Riv-
er Song Foundation (http://riversongfoundation.org) has
been helping with the search, but so far, no luck.
Monte is worried. Josephine needs medicine, and it’s
now been almost two weeks since she’s been gone. He’s
also worried about the Fourth of July, because she hates
fireworks.
Have you seen Josephine, or do you know someone who
has? If you have any information, call Monte at 503-458-
6828 or Rita at 503-861-2003. The Ear hopes someone will
come forward so Josephine can be returned home to the
family who loves and misses her.
Cyndi Mudge is a kind soul and took in pot-bellied pig named
Hamilton as a foster pet when he outgrew his home. Given as a gift
from a husband to his wife, all went well for a while. But the couple
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“loves belly rubs” and needs “companion pets and people who enjoy
spending time with him.” Sadly, there were no takers.
Finally, Cyndi contacted the Harmony Farm Sanctuary in Sis-
ters — which, according to their Facebook page, “is dedicated to
rescuing, rehabilitating and occasionally rehoming farm animals” —
and they said they would take him. Sounded perfect for Hamilton,
everyone agreed. Except Hamilton, apparently.
When the day came to transport him to Sisters, Cyndi recruited
Ronni Harris to help coax Hamilton up a ramp and into the van.
“We lured with his favorite snack — Cheerios. Nope. Didn’t work.”
Nothing did. He resisted all efforts to get him into the van, and Ronni
injured her foot in the process.
Pictured, Hamilton sleeping serenely in the backyard, unmoved.
Also pictured, Ronni (left), and Cyndi (right). “That is the look of
defeat just before tears,” Cyndi recalled.
So far, Pig: 1, Cyndi and Ronni: 0.
‘I recently ran into Michelle Lesniak, the Season 11 Proj-
ect Runway winner, from Portland, and she’s here visiting,”
Cyndy Lee (pictured inset) wrote. Cyndy works at Godfather’s
Books in Astoria, and was outside on the sidewalk taking a
break when she spotted the now-famous fashion designer walk-
ing by.
Michelle is pictured in a photo from her website, http://
michellelesniak.com, where it says that she trained at The
School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is self-taught in both
garment design and leather working. She plans to stay in the
fashion industry in Portland, which is her home town. You can
watch Michelle’s Project Runway win here: http://tinyurl.com/
runway11
“She’s got her traditional hairdo, where it’s kind of shaved
on one side, long on the other,” Cyndy recalled. “I said to her,
‘Thank you for making us proud,’ and she was very nice. She’s
just like on TV — just being herself.”
“I should keep a camera,” Cyndy noted, “as we get lots of
celebs in the store.” Good idea.
COMMUNITY NOTES
SATURDAY
Angora Hiking Club — 9 a.m.,
Sixth Street parking lot, or 10 a.m.
at trail head. Phyllis Dubb Memorial
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503-791-5325.
Columbia Northwestern Mod-
el Railroading Club — 1 p.m., in
Hammond. Group runs trains on
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SUNDAY
National Alliance on Mental
Illness (NAMI) Support Group
— WR SP 6HDVLGH 3XEOLF
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from a serious brain (mental) illness.
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Lower Columbia River Chap-
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of America — 5 p.m., Serendipity
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Quarterly meeting and buffet dinner.
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at 503-861-9832.
Line Dancing — 5:30 to 8 p.m.,
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MONDAY
Senior Lunch — 11:30 a.m.,
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$6.75 for those younger than 60.
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is at 503-861-4200.
Columbia Senior Diners —
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Warrenton Senior Lunch Pro-
gram —QRRQ:DUUHQWRQ&RPPX-
QLW\&HQWHU6:7KLUG6W6XJ-
gested donation of $5 for seniors
and $7 for those younger than 60.
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Line Dancing for Seniors — 6
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Astoria Rotary Club — noon,
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Knochlers Pinochle Group —
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prize. Game is designed for play-
ers 55 and older, but all ages are
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Astoria Toastmasters — 6:30
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TUESDAY
Do Nothing Club — 10 a.m.
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2721.
Senior Lunch — 11:30 a.m.,
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$YHQXH$6HDVLGH6XJJHVWHGGR-
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$6.75 for those younger than 60.
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is at 503-861-4200.
Columbia Senior Diners —
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Astoria Lions Club — noon,
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Larsen at 503-325-0590.
Line Dancing for Seniors —
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503-325-3231.
Spinning Circle — 3 to 5 p.m.,
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WEDNESDAY
Moms Offering Moms Sup-
port Club — DP &DSW *UD\
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Help Ending Abusive Re-
lationship Tendencies — 10
WR DP 7KH +DUERU
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spot at 503-325-3426. ext. 104.
Open Sewing Gathering —
10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Homespun
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Wickiup Senior Lunches —
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for those older than 60 ($3 sug-
gested donation), $6.75 for those
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4200.
See NOTES, Page 2B