The daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1961-current, January 27, 2015, Image 1

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    TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2015
142nd YEAR, No. 150
ONE DOLLAR
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Judge issues restraining order blocking acquisition
By DERRICK DePLEDGE
The Daily Astorian
Daily Astorian file
Smoke and flames billow from the Pacific Coast Seafood plant
on Northeast Skipanon Drive in Warrenton June 4, 2013. A com-
plaint against Pacific Seafoods Group alleges the company may
not rebuild in Warrenton if it acquires Ocean Gold Seafoods.
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won a temporary restraining order block-
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est seafood processors on the West Coast.
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ing and coldwater shrimp markets in vio-
lation of federal antitrust law.
The complaint also claims there is a
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acquires controlling interest in Ocean
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space from the Port of Astoria at Tongue
Point since the Warrenton plant burned
down.
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the competitive health of the West Coast
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an independent competitor rather than
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through either an exclusive marketing
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acquiring it,” said Michael Haglund, a
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Englund Marine turns 70
Company has
11 locations
across the
West Coast
men, including Dennis Rankin of Rankin
Fish in Astoria.
A federal judge in U.S. District Court
in Medford issued the temporary re-
straining order Friday and set a hearing
for Feb. 9.
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tions of monopoly business practices. A
settlement in 2012 included a provision
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an exclusive marketing agreement with
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general counsel and director of govern-
ment affairs, called the new lawsuit a
See SEAFOOD, Page 10A
Cannon
Beach
sets 2015
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Area events center,
affordable living on
council’s game plan
By EDWARD STRATTON
The Daily Astorian
A
xel Englund opened En-
glund Marine on July 22,
1944, in a 50-by-50-foot
building on a rebuilt dock at 101
15th St. with three employees. It
was, at that time, one of at least
four marine supply stores in Asto-
ria.
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later, his son Jon and grandson
Kurt, CEO and president of En-
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gathered more than 100 of their
employees in the warehouse on the
backside of their 44,000-square-
foot retail center on Hamburg Av-
enue Saturday.
Their employees came during
EDWARD STRATTON — The Daily Astorian
See ENGLUND, Page 10A
Running Englund Marine Group, from left, are President Kurt Englund, Chief Financial Officer Jeremy
Davis and CEO Jon Englund, right, son of Englund Marine’s founder Axel Englund.
By ERICK BENGEL
EO Media Group
CANNON BEACH — The Can-
non Beach City Council is anticipat-
ing a year packed with projects:
Increasing hotel revenue; expand-
ing NeCus’ Park; adding acreage
to the Ecola Creek Forest Reserve;
reviewing the master development
plan for the city’s South Wind prop-
erty top the list of the City Council’s
goals for 2015.
At its annual retreat Jan. 24 at
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Steidel as mayor — the council ze-
roed in on these general concerns,
which will be-
come part of a
broader strate-
gic plan incor-
porating feed-
back from city
staff and the
Cannon Beach
community.
The strate-
gic plan may
also lay out
Sam
options for ad-
Steidel
dressing Can-
non Beach’s affordable housing
scarcity and making the city more
sustainable and eco-friendly.
Woodburn City Administrator
Scott Derickson served as the volun-
teer facilitator, helping to articulate
and organize the council’s short-
term priorities. Derickson is a former
Clatsop County manager and former
Warrenton city manager.
Action items
Photo Courtesy of Englund Marine Group
Axel Englund opened Englund Marine July 22, 1944, with three employees. The company now employs 126 at 11 locations across the
Western U.S.
The council plans to start tak-
ing care of a handful of items fairly
soon, including:
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information technology manager;
• Deciding whether the city’s
dune management plan should be
updated;
• Requiring reports from the
various city boards, committees
See COUNCIL, Page 10A
Rehab work is a bear of a job at Oregon refuges
crew to initially bottle-feed
and otherwise care for the
bears until they could be re-
MERLIN (AP) — As Da- turned to Alaska and released
vid Siddon strolls past the the following spring. But be-
cougar enclosure at Wildlife fore that could happen, Alaska
Images Rehabilitation and tightened its policy, banning
Education Center toward the the release of animals heavily
bear pens, his voice alerts cared for by humans. Yak and
Yak, and the 22-year-old, Kodi have remained at Wild-
800-pound grizzly bear trots life Images ever since.
to the gate to meet him.
“My dad was pretty
At Alaska wildlife biol- peeved they didn’t take them
ogists’ behest, Yak and her back,” says Siddon, who now
EURWKHU .RGL ZHUH ÀRZQ LQ runs the center. “Before that, a
to Wildlife Images from Alas- handshake and a good thought
ka in 1993 as cubs after their were good enough.”
mother was killed by a male
Right now no one is good
grizzly and the cubs rescued enough to rehabilitate black
by bush pilots.
bears in Oregon, where no re-
The plan was for Siddon’s hab centers have the facilities,
father, Wildlife Images found- staff and policies in place to
er David Siddon Sr., and his meet the meticulous protocols
By MARK FREEMAN
Medford Mail Tribune
for ensuring that cubs raised
in captivity don’t turn into
nuisance bears once released.
Wildlife Images and the
seven other major rehab cen-
ters in Oregon, plus 38 small-
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ey and space needed to house
orphaned cubs in penned ar-
eas without the bears relating
people to food — the bane
that often ends in the animals’
deaths, authorities say.
Bears habituated to peo-
ple make up the lion’s share of
bear-damage and public-safety
complaints in Western Oregon.
Captured ones are euthanized
under Oregon wildlife policy
because relocating habituated
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See REFUGES, Page 10A
AP Photo/The Medford Mail Tribune, Jamie Lusch
Yak, a grizzly bear at Wildlife Images Rehabilitation and
Education Center, takes a rest inside his enclosure at the
center near Merlyn Wednesday.