The Corvallis times. (Corvallis, Or.) 1888-1909, June 22, 1904, Image 2

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    Oorvallis Times.
Official Paper of BenUm lontr.
OOBTALUB, OBEGON, JC2SE SS, 104.
jS to agricvltubal stvdents.
The Agricultural College has
critics. In the mala, they are
small - newspapers : unacquainted
with, the subiect they discuss. They
complain that there are not enough
students in the agricultural course,
and one goes so far as to say that
in this respect the college is like
the play of Hamlet without Hamlet
in the cast
There is no justification for the
criticism, nor is is there virtue in
it. The occasion lor it is doubtless
a widely prevalent notion that, be
cause of its name, the function of
tli agriculture' college is to teach
agriculture, and but little else. The
fact is that, while agriculture is aa
important essential in the prescrib
ed course of instruction there are
vital provisions for other and equal
ly essential courses. AH these
courses, agricultural included, are
set put in instructions supplied ad
ministrative officers of so-called Ag
ricultural colleges by officials at
Washington, D. C . charged with
careof t hef unds a ppropriated by Con
gress for founding and maintaining
the colleges. Uiider date of Nov 26,
iqoiv in-t ructions sent out by Com
misbioner Harris and signed by
Secretary Hitchcock, prescribed the
following for the curriculum ol Ag
ricultural colleges
Schedule A, Instruction in Agriculture
Agriculture, horticulture, forestry,
aeronomy, animal husbandry, dairying
veterinary science, poultry industry,
apiculture.
Rrhedule B. Instruction in Mechanic
Arts Mechanical engineering, civil en
gineering, electrical engineering, "irriga
tion engineering, mining engineering,
marine engineering, railway engineering
exonrimental engineering, textile indus
try, architecture, machine design, mech
anical drawing, ceramics, sinography
tvoewritlne. telegraphy, printing, shop
work.
Schedule C Instruction in English
Laneuaee English language, English
literature, composition, rhetoric, oratory
Schedule D, Instruction in Mathe
matiVnl Sciences Mathematics, book-
keeping, astronomy.
Schedule E, Instruction in Natural and
Physical Sciences Chemistry, physics
biology, botany, zoology, geology, min
eralogy, metallurgy, entomology, phy
siology, bacteriology, pharmacy, phy
soical geography, meteorolgy.
Schedule F, Instruction in Economic
Sciences Political eeonomy, domestic
economy, commercial geography.
Thus, the true function of these
federally-endowed colleges is to
train young men in the industrials,
educating hand and brain together.
fitting them for every sphere in the
vast industrial life that is making
this couutry greater than all others,
and moulding them for a useful,
educated, contented and self-sup-TJortine
citizenship. la the above
list every subject under schedule ex
cept forestry, is taught in the col
lege at CorvalHs. while of the oth
er prescribed subjects many are un
touched, which shows, that as a
matter of fact, the agricultural
phase of the college is emphasized
and made prominent, while the
other courses are, for lack of means
opportunity and time for develop
ment, much neglected. The policy
is thus maintained, because Oregon
yet is largely an agricultural state
and with a hope of doing the ut
most for agricultural industry. It
shows error in the complaint of
those who criticize.
When critics insist that there
should be more students in the
agricultural course, they lose sight
of the fact that you can lead a horse
to water, but you cannot make
him drink. You can set an agri
cultural course before a college
student, but you cannot make him
take it. At Corvallis, the costliest
N building, the finest laboratories,
the highest salaried instructors are
devoted to agriculture. The course
of study is made the broadest with
; the most elective and other attract
ive features in order to divert stud'
ents into it. At matriculation
time, from the president down, the
watchword of the faculty is to
steer a many students as possible
all the boys in the ' institution do
not enter that course. All of the
boys do not want to study agricul
ture, and go to farming. Many
a one of them is charged by mother
or father before he leaves home, to
study mechanical engineering, elec
trical engineering, mining enin-
eering, or some otner appueu
ence in which the salary to be re-1
ceived after graduation promises to
be larger than can be earned on the
farm. . 'Many a boy "by birth and
nature has a knack for something
else and to force Tiim to study .agri
culture and go back to the; farm
might ruin a first class mechanical
engineer and spoil a fine farm. The
question of how many students en
ter the agricultural course is con
trolled partly by God Almighty.
partly by the parents, but mostly,
by natural, inevitable causes, and
are whollv bevond the reacn or
control of a college faculty or the
board of managers. At Corvallis,
the agricultural course is available
for a thousand students if they want
it, it is made the most attractive of
all the courses in the institution
and if the classes are not , filled,
whose would be the blame whose
but the boys themselves? Inciden
tally however, it is a fact, that, in
spite of the critics, OAC graduates
a larger per cent of students in the
agricultural course than does any
other so called agricultural college
in the United States. At 1 Cornell
this year, of 300 graduates, 11 were ;
in the agricultural course., At
Berkeley, California, recently, in a
class of more than 200,' one was in
the agricultural course, and she
was a woman. At OAC this year,
thirty per cent of the male students
were graduated from the agricul
tural course.
As conducted, the Oregon Agri
cultural College seems to be a fairly
successful educational institution.
For two years in succession its at
tendance has been between 500 and
6ao, perhaps more than double the
attendance of any other educational
institution in Oregon. Attendance
is a sure sign of . whether or not a
college is successful. Students at
tend, if they get what they want.
It they do not get what they want
they do not attend, and their num
bers are accordingly limited, and
the institution correspondingly un
successful. Further, the general
government provides a certain sum
to support the school. If only 200
young men and women are educat
ed from these funds, the money
will be but one-third as successfully
spent as if 600 young people are ed
ucated from it. Attendance, there
fore is a correct measure of an edu
cational institution's success or fail
ure, and so tested, the college at
Corvallis is without a peer or a riv
al in Oregon. Possibly this fact
explains why there are critics and
criticism,
A broad and beautiful view of
life is to build up rather than to
tear down, and state pride in a
noble state institution ought to
preserve that institution from com
plaint, at least such complaint as is
not based on accurate information.
TO MEET SATURDAY.
Corvallis Ladies to Consider Exhibits
for Benton County at Fairs.
To the Ladies of Corvallis:
Greeting: - v
The county court has appointed
me to assist in collecting an exhib
it of Benton, county products for
the Iewis and Clark fair. - It is the
wish of the court to have the ex
hibit prepared this year, so. it can
be shown at the State iair in Sept
ember and at the National Grange
Fair in November, as well as at
the great fair the next year. Now
it - seems to me mat ine pre
parations of fruits, jellies, and
should be considered women's work
as well as needlework, painting and
other fancy articles.
In order to get together to talk it
over and to decide what can be
done, I ask the ladies of Corvallis
and vicinity to meet: at the court
house on Saturday June 25th. at
2-30 o'clock to discuss the ; matter.
I especially desire the co-operatiori
of the ladies of the Lewis and
Clark Club, the Grange and other
societies whose object is the advan
cement of our county and city.
Let us make a great effort to have
the county take an important place
among the counties of our state at
all these fairs.
Respectfully,
Mary Harris Whitby.
PEELING; CHITTIM.
The Price is Five Cents in Alsea
. Large Quantities will be Peeled. ;
..... Chittim peeling is in progress in
the Alsea country, and a large part,
of the population is engaged ; in the
industryr Five cents per pound
is offered for the bark at Wade
Malone's store, according to. Frank
Hughes, who was in town Monday,
but nobody is selling at.that figure,
except in rare instances, when an
occasional small lot goes . at that
price. Most of the peelers will hold
for a better figure, and unless, many
of them get 10 cents a pound they
will hold over to another season, .
It is estimated that - seven-tenths
of the remaining bark in the Alsea
country will be peeled ; this season.
Much of the bark on the railroad
lands is being peeled. The chittim
on these lands is disposed of : to
peelers on a basis of one-third to
one-half for peeling, the bark to be
delivered to the railroad company
at Malone's store. Willis Vidlto
has been appointed agent of the
railroad company, to look after
their interests in the chittim busi
ness. So far, practically no bark
has been delivered.
For Sale. ' '
Span of mares.Inquire of Frank Francis
co, uorvauis.
Cattle for Sale.
Milk cows and heifers in considerable
numbers. Inquire of John ' Stahlbusch
Corvallis.
Go to Blackledge's for window shades .
Save Your Wood.
All persons wishing wood cut in
the city can be accommodated on
short notice. ? I have : a gasolene
outfit and it will cost you no more
and eave your wood.
Phone 631. W. E, Boddy,
Corvallis.
Dr. Lowe, the well known oculo-
opticion, has returned trom JNew
York where he has been tsKing a
course on the eye and will be in
Corvallis at the Occidental Hotel,
Wednesday, and Thursday noon,
June 22 and 23. Dr. Lowe has all
the latest and beet ideas in his pro
fession.
New Sawmill
Two miles west of Boelah church
All kinds of rough lumber constant
ly on hand. Orders 'promptly
filled. Address, Otis bkipton,
B F D No 2, Corvallis.
SRANS CELIBEMIOH
to be beld in Corvallis
J LJIiY 2, 3 and 4 1904,
Baseball
Foot Racing
, Horse Racing
Sacred Concert
; Band Music
GRAND
E " BALL
OPERA HOUSE
MONDAY
t; EVENING
PROGRAMME.
" SATURDAY JCI.Y 2nd.
-9 a. m Shooting tournament on
Avery's fiat. Open to all. There
will be some good purses offered.
' 1 p. m. Championship baseball
game, free for all, between two pro
tessional teams for purse of $15.
3 p. m. Horse racing on Kigers
track. The best" products . of Ore
gon will be entered. Racing in all
classes, such as trotting, running,
pacing. These races open to all.
$250 in purses,
SUNDAY JULY 3rd.
This day will be devoted to Pat
riotic Union Services, held at the
court house yard, and to be parti
cipated in by all the churches. The
music will be a special feature. A
Union Choir of. all the . churches.
The afternoon a grand sacred con
cert and short speeches by promi
nent people. '
i' MONDAY JULY 4th.
Salute at sunrise. Plenty of good
stirring music by two bands. The
parade will start at 10 a. m. and
will be one of the most brilliant af
fairs ever witnessed! ink Corvallis.
! ji p. m. The racing will begin
on Main street consisting of the fol
lowing, open to all.
Bicycle race ist prize $10 2nd $5
Hurdle race ist $10; 2nd $5
440 yd race ist $10; 2nd $5
50-yd dash 1st $7; 2nd $3
100-yd dash ist $10; 2nd $5
Boys under 15 ist $5; '2nd $2.50
Fat Men's race 50 yd ist $10
Potatoe race ist $2.50
Hose race wet test $50 r
Other events on Main street:
Tug of war $5
Climbing Greased Pole $5
Best Decorated Float $10 : . J ,
Best Looking Turnout, two
horses $5
Band concert on main street
P. A. Kline,
Grand Marshal
E. R. Bryson,
Geo Brown ,
Aides
J. B. Irvine,
Pres. of the Day
Hon L. T. Harris
Orator
Geo L. Paul,
Reader
Find any kind of 4th of July fire
works that you want at Hodes'
gun store.
For Sale.
A first class sewing machine in good
condition. Also a fine walnut diningtable
Inquire at Times office.
Best That's Grown
Is 1 None Too Good.
When you are drinking ;
Coffee it is our, good,
fortune to hold the Sole -Agency
for the famous
Chase & Sanborn
High Grade
Collees
We have all the grades from 2oc
per pound to the highest priced.
Coffee sold by this celebrated firm.
.mij,,!J,U.fejiM1
Don't Worry
about these little fellows.
They can't fall.
They're holding fast to
2
fSThe buttons never come off.
Try them yourself and see.
lo cents a. button; $1 a rip.
Sold only by
IS BEST
OF ALL CEREAL FOODS
ZEST is always ready and f
makes a delicious lunch any
time of day or night; ;
HODES' GROCERY,
PHONE 483, CORVALLIS, OBl
For fireworks with which to cele
brate, go to Hodes gun store.
Painting and Paper Hanging.
All orders promptly filled. Phone
05. Samuel Kerr.
Bay your firecrackers and ice
cream in Corvallis July 2, 3; & '4.
into the agricultural course. Butmatting.
Blackledge keeps large assortment of
Give Us a Trial Order
for one of their Coffees and you
will use it exclusively.
P. m Zierolf
Groceries, Grockery & Stoneware
Agt. for Libby Gut Glass
Horse races, hose races, bicycle
and fat man's races, and lots of
good things that have not been
mentioned. In Ooivallis, the 4th.
For Sale.
A few choice Poland China pigs, both
sexes, from registered stock, $5 per head
inquire of Eobert Wvlie, Lewisburg.
Onr sample line of swell summer
clothine is now in. OAC Pressing Co
For Sale
First class, second, growth fir wood of
uniform length, no round sticks. Guar
anteed 128 cubic feet per cord. - Leave
orders at P. M. Zierolf.
D. S. Adams,
At Cost
Stoves, Ranges,
rJnnlrinc TT.ptii1r
Washing Machines
Wringers, Etc.
Are being closed out at absolute cost.
Commencing now and continuing until sold
out. Come early and secure good selections
3. D. EUann $ 0o.
Furniture ana Carpet Store.