Keizertimes. (Salem, Or.) 1979-current, March 27, 2015, Image 6

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    PAGE A6, KEIZERTIMES, MARCH 27, 2015
OFFICER,
continued from Page A1
day. Even after 20 years, you
never know what you’ll expe-
rience. It just depends on the
day.”
A perfect example came
when the Keizertimes rode
along with Anderson on a re-
cent Tuesday morning. Over
the course of several hours, no
calls came in.
That was in vivid contrast
to the day before, when An-
derson was slammed with calls
throughout her 12-hour shift.
Others with the KPD spent
that Tuesday morning clean-
ing up an apartment fi lled
with drugs and stolen items
Anderson had uncovered the
day before.
“Nothing was easy yester-
day,” said Anderson, who also
had to drive a prisoner to
Woodburn late that afternoon.
“You never know what you’re
HIT,
continued from Page A1
mowed my front yard without
me asking. We have some for-
mer Keizer friends who live in
Bend who opened their home
to me. I spent some nights at
their house, even when they
weren’t there. That was so
great.”
For about 10 years now,
Carolyn and Tom Homan
have been regularly eating
dinners on Fridays with Mau-
rice and Heilinger, as well as
Carol and Martin Doerfl er.
Carolyn Homan has been
among the many friends hop-
ing for the best.
“Joanne posted the news
on Facebook the next day,”
Homan said. “I remember say-
ing out loud ‘Oh no!’ At that
going to get. Last weekend
was relatively slow, so I caught
up on loose ends and paper-
work. Then yesterday was cra-
zy. Yesterday was just one call
after another.”
The main call was stolen
items and drugs at an apart-
ment on the 1000 block of
Ring Street. A guy who had
recently been released from
jail visited his apartment for
the fi rst time since being re-
leased and found a number
of things that shouldn’t have
been there.
“Kudos to him,” Anderson
said. “He’s trying to get his life
back on track. The amount of
drugs in there was a substantial
amount.”
Anderson said it was quick-
ly obvious things in the apart-
ment weren’t on the up and
up.
“There were some nice
bikes, a new pressure washer
– not the things you would
typically have in your apart-
ment,” she said.
While processing the scene,
Anderson had a fl ashback to a
call she responded to in Janu-
ary.
“I remembered taking a
stolen report on one of those
bikes from Keizer Station,” she
said. “Yesterday I called the
owner of the nice green bike.
He had gone into GameStop
and leaned the bike against a
window. He saw the guy ride
off with it. It was cool to be
able to call him and tell him
we found his bike. He didn’t
believe me at fi rst. Those are
the feel good moments. They
don’t happen very often.”
Part of the reason, An-
derson points out, is people
don’t typically call the police
department to share positive
news.
“The normal human brain
can’t process this stuff,” she
said. “We see death, heart-
break and destruction every
day. People don’t call us to
tell about their day. They call
because they have a problem.
You need to fi nd a way to let
it go.”
Anderson, who fi nds her
release by showing horses, ex-
ercising and working on her
property, noted as a patrol of-
fi cer she’s often the fi rst one
at a scene.
“I’m the factfi nder,” she
said. “I go and see what we’ve
got. Do I need extra hands?
With the apartment yesterday,
it was clear I’d need extra help.
I told the sergeant I needed
more hands, so we discussed a
plan. We’re the pillars.”
For Anderson, she wanted
to be a pillar in her hometown.
And yes, her parents have rid-
den with her on a shift before
to see what it’s like.
“When I decided I wanted
to go into law enforcement, I
wanted to be in Keizer,” An-
derson said. “I wanted to pro-
tect my people. Sometimes
it’s interesting policing the
place you grew up. You might
come across a drug situation
and fi nd it was someone you
point it was just a rundown of
his injuries. I couldn’t imagine
it. It was very surprising. You
know (bicycle riding) can be
dangerous, but still you don’t
expect it.”
On St. Patrick’s Day, the
trio of couples, minus Mau-
rice, went out for dinner to-
gether.
Heilinger had just returned
from Bend and gave her
friends medical updates.
“It’s always more fun with
the six of us,” Homan said.
Homan would love to
have Maurice back in the area
while he recovers.
“We can’t wait to have him
back,” she said. “Maybe we’ll
take some takeout food over
there.”
Like Heilinger, Homan has
been impressed with the sup-
port shown.
“It’s been great,” she said.
“The Salem Bicycle Club is a
great group. They’ve all been
asking about him. A lot of
folks helped Joanne right after
the accident. One friend went
to Bend with her since she had
to get John’s bike and car. It’s
a really good group of people.
Neighbors were standing in
the street waiting for her to
come home, taking care of the
cats and mowing the lawn. It’s
nice to have people step up
like that without being asked.
It’s pretty cool.”
Maurice posted about the
incident on his Facebook
page the morning after being
injured, before he had his ini-
tial surgery.
“I woke up in the hospital
wondering why I was there,”
Maurice wrote on March 15.
“I found out that my injuries
were a little bit more exten-
sive than originally thought...
After talking with the doctor
it looks like all of my plans
for races this summer are in
doubt.
“All I remember about the
accident is just waking up on
the road, wondering why I was
there,” he added later. “How-
ever, the kind policeman told
me what had happened...I was
found by my friends on the
bike ride I was doing, who
called 911.”
Maurice wrote later his
summer race plans didn’t look
too good.
“What does look good is
that I expect to be able to re-
cover completely from my in-
juries and will be able (to) fo-
cus on this race in the years to
follow. I am in good spirits and
I know that I am receiving the
best care possible, which will
allow me to have fun in the
future,” he wrote.
KEIZERTIMES/Craig Murphy
Offi cer Carrie Anderson with the Keizer Police Department
drives past the home she grew up in on Chehalis Court.
went to school with. On the
fl ip side, you get to see people
you grew up with doing great
things. It’s good to be able to
see how the city has grown
and changed.”
COWAN,
continued from Page A1
with 14 cents (per $1,000 of
assessed value),” Cowan said.
“Right now the rate is $.11,
but it has been as high as $.20.
As the assessed value in Keizer
goes up, the rate you pay goes
down.”
Cowan reminded GGNA
members about preparing for
disasters and how the Keizer
CERT (Community Emer-
gency Response Team) is part
of the KFD’s emergency plan.
“CERT has 17 zones in
Keizer, each with a block
captain,” Cowan said. “What
people need to do is be pre-
pared for seven days with no
assistance. When we’re talking
about a disaster of that pro-
portion, fi refi ghters won’t be
available since they will be ab-
sorbed in the disaster.”
Among Cowan’s tips: not
waiting until the last minute
to refi ll medical prescriptions
and having enough drinking
water.
“Water is one of the most
diffi cult deals,” Cowan said.
“Having a case of water in the
garage is a really good idea.
Buy a couple of cases of water,
keep them in the garage and
rotate them out.”
Three fi re board seats are
open in May, with a total of
fi ve candidates having fi led
by last week’s deadline. James
Mulhern and Chet Patterson
are competing for the Position
3 seat, while former Keizer
City Councilor Jim Taylor is
going against Betty Hart – the
wife of former board member
Mike Hart – for the Position
5 seat. Mike Bauer is running
unopposed for the Position 4
seat.
“I’ll have three positions
open and they’re all good can-
didates,” Cowan said. “Three
of them now are from the
budget committee. When
Mike Hart resigned (due to
health concerns in Decem-
ber), then people noticed the
seats.”
Cowan gave an update on
the fall election, when the
KFD is expected to run a new
bond levy.
“Our citizen advisory
committee has talked about
the bond rate and is okay
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