The Stayton mail. (Stayton, Marion County, Or.) 1895-current, June 24, 1920, Image 3

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FACE COURT WITH THEIR BOY, CHAMP DEMPSEY
bTATE CH A M BER S E E K S
TO DOUBLE POPULATION
ON F A R M S IN 3 Y EA R S
it *
A
V
m
I ’urent-llke— when their hoy wan In trouble— they dropped
everythin« and rushed to hla aid. even though he l>e the ehamplon
fighter o f the world. Thla ahowa Mr. illram DetnpM-y and hla w ife—
with their boy. Champion Jack Dempmiy, at Han Franciuco be the
trial started In U. H. federal court charging the champion with having
evaded the draft durlpv war
Are You in the Automobile Contest?
Orr-gon haa water reooureei to Ir
rtgatn 4 two,00« acres of land now un
ptoduetlve, and which would eupport
In comfort, 200.000 w w population, or
about to.ooo new families.
If In It* three year'a camps* ?n to
put famine» on Oregon's «m aul land,
the Oregon Slate Chamber of Com
mere# can bring 1.004 f a m i l i e s to util-
ixo thla land and water, It will moan in
*xperdlturea alone lor auch coiiiiuOtil-
tb r i a clothing, food, furniture, ehh/
of $l,0*tO,000, culeulatlng the cxpendl-
tuna for an entire family ut only
$1040 per year, to say nothing of the
wraith produced by these new settler».
I .and seltl'Client lie one of the chief
ajms of the Oregon Stale <'liamlier of
Comtnerc' <•» *
» " ir r m i In Its
movement to aid fn th" development of
the Htuto.
Oregon has 10.000.000 a res of till-
; abb: land now uncultivated.
Oregon produced 20,4oo,ub0 bushels
| of wheat In 1910.
If Oregon’^ 16,040,00« acre« of till
. able b it uncultivated land were planted
' In wheat and the yiedd were the Ore­
gon average for ten yearo— 21.0 bushels
I per acre—new production would b>
¡350,400,0« bushels which, at the price
today of $3 per buph'J would mean a
cash vatu« of $1.051.340.404.
Teach Child Courtesy.
The Oregon S tile (J is u .jr of Com-
flood milliners lui children ns well as
rx>• rc« eapecte to double tbo number grown iieople srw the expression of
of fsnaert In Ihre« years. if thla an Innate consideration for lite right*.
Sir an» double the wheat crop. it will («rlvlb j.es mul opinions of other oe««-
mean an additional yleid of 24.400,040 pl«S
bushela of whast, whlch at Ute pre-
\i«ur« of experience hove crystal-
velliag prtce would mrun a cash value il/eil ijifs feeling Into certain corneo
% new n.oney of $11.200,040.
llotial forma of ex|»resslr»n. which ev­
ery chini vtionld be taught. The lit
fie hnblts «•( courtesy, which sboubl
Achievement Follows Work.
be » part of evi-ry dny life, an- r«-iiby
A r< «oiling 'ige «lenir. I« re .«pert
the "outward und visible sigi« of sn
for the I terso it of other, imi mutter
Inwiiril grace." Few ncqulttftlnn« ure
uhm tile sex or «rem! sta.ioii. It's
more valuable to anyone than that
folly for it man to Imagine Mint he Is
cluirrn of r-moner which wins the nu­
sinnig««!) «leetlnad to rank ubo ve his
meri late rvg-ird of everyone with whom
t'cKou ». \ ou limy be ou tbe rumi to
they coinè into contact
power, bui timi will result from ntness
Dither limn from nny endow nient of
divinity. The old Idea licit buture be-
Anatomy Among the Ancients.
Hlo « except loiiul gift« ills at certain
It hns l«s-n pointed out that the
Individuals Is pretty inueli detlou. It'S
nice for the ylfte«l bill rallier Imrd on statues nnd plntjues carved In stone
the common, ordinary ctiup. Hut ex­ and wood to he seen In the fllreh mil-
perience sliyus tlmt achievement Is a seam prove that the priest rnnmniiflers
inaile.-- of work nod not «if gift. The o f Memphis d.iaxi year« ago possessed
vmr'sl I» «hilly »warding prizes lo those a profound knowledge v Anatomy. Xc|.
who dure to toll tu the limit for the eoce. therefore, as Lorgyer retnurked.
suke of winning place. Men who rise Is as old ns art. nnd they have ad­
to r- ninln leaders are those who 01 vanced together.
I Inin-'Ives to hold high slutlou.
Another remarkable fart In thla con-
! nectlon Is that excavation» In Itnly
have brought to light scores o f finely
London's Subway System.
fjwtdnn's
un«lergr4uti«l
rnIKaya finished surgical Instruments for cer­
transport ».OOOjWIO passengers «laity. tain operations, which are in almost
The vehlcl«*» controlled hjr the roads every particular of form like those
make a total Journey every day equal i reinvented In modem times and used
to 20 circuits of the «-arth. The gross by the most advanced surgeons of
today.
revenu«- euch Ul"i)îb Is £1,000.000.
*
____________
Doll Up, Clean Up, Dress Up for THE FOURTH.
-—■zmzztam
Buy a Suit at
■ ’¿ z u s rzz zB *
Bishop’s Protection Sale
* 4
YouTl be well dressed, look prosperous and feel fine, for there is satisfaction built into every suit of Hart, Schaf-
nea & Marx, Michael Sterns or David Adler's High Grade Clothes, and then there is the Price consideration which
is extremely interesting. Every Suit bears the Original Price Tag.
Take
20%
O ff All Clothing, Hats and Shoes
20</< and More Off All Men’ s Suits
All Men's $25 suits now
All Men's $30 suits now
All Men's $35 suits now*
All Men’s $40 suits now
All Men's $45 suits now
All Men's $50 suits now
All Men's $60 suits now
All Men's $65 suits now
All Men's $70 suits now
All Men's $75 suits now
$19.95
23.95
27.95
31.95
35.95
39.95
47.95
51.95
55.95
59.95
100 Men’s Suits Less
20% Off All Boys’. Suits
All Boys $14 suits now
$11.20
A ll Boys $15 suits now
12.00
Suits tat were $25, $30, $35, $40 A ll Boys $16 suits now
12.80
$50 and $60 Staple or Young Men’s A ll Boys $17 suits now
13.60
Ï Models at*33 1-3 pr. ct. off
All Boys $18 suits now
14.40
All Hats Less 20%
All Boys $19 suits now
15.20
Our Entire Stock of Mallory and Ststson Hats,
All Boys $20 suits now
16.00
Regular $5.00, $6.00, $7.50, ¿9.00 and $10.00
Ail Boys $22.50 suits now 18.00
Less 20 per cent t A ll Boys $25 00 suits now 20.00
3 3 l|3 Pr. Ct.
DEMOCRATIC CONTROL’
FOR STATE CHAMBER
Subscribers
to
Budget
Wilt
Pave Voice In Matter
of Expenditures.
"Af;«-r I have subscribe«! to th, Ara­
gon S'uli- Chamber of Commerce, w?:at
part will 1 have In the organization?**
This question Is frequently beard In
connection with the Htate Chamber ex­
pansion movement now in progress.
The answer Hi that all subscribers
will have a voice in »aylng how the
money will be spent. By thla and
other methods the fundamental demo­
cracy of the organization la assured.
Of course the Board of Director»,- to
which every member Is eligible.—will
actually expend the funds of the organ­
ization; but they will be guided In
their expenditures by the wishes of the
subscribers.
To determine what the subscribers
want the State Chamber to do, group
meetings will be held In every center
of population In the state, when all sub­
scribers will be called together and
asked to answer, In •'rltlng, the fol­
lowing questions:
1. What can the Oregon State Cham­
ber of Commerce do to Improve condi­
tions of opportunities In your own lins
of business or profession?
2. What do you believe the Oregon
State Chamber of Commerce should do
to advance the Interests of your own
community?
3. What In your opinion as x citizen.
Is th« thing of first importance for
the Oregon State Chamber of Com­
merce to do for the good of the state
as a whole?
After these group meetings have
been held under the direction of the
executive committee in charge of the
campaign, each district will select one
representative to attend a convention
with the officers and directors of the
State Chamber, and the answers to the
questions will be formulated Into a
program of activities designed to unite
the entire state on definite tasks.
The program of work will also con­
trol expenditures. When work Is start­
ed on this program the directors w ill
follow their present practice of submit­
ting questions of wide importance by
means of referendum.
The Directors represent every city
snd county in the state. Representa­
tion on the Board is arranged geo­
graphically and not based on popula­
tion. Eastern Oregon is represented by
five Directors, Western Oregon by five,
Multnomah County by two, and them
are three at targe; making a total of
fifteen, which avoids the possibility
of control by any one section.
To sum up: The State Chamber will
do what the subscriber* themselves say V
should be done.
It will function
through a Board of Directors elected
by delegates and officers, including an
executive secretary elected by the
Board. Voting will be done by consti­
tuent members. Individual subscribers
help make up the program of activities
and carry them to completion through
committee service.
WORLD’S POOREST CiTY
IS MADE RICH EST
BY TOURIST TRAVEL
9
THE VIRDICT IS RENDERED
FOR SEVEN M 0 R E*D AYS
j
The Evidence is Overwhelming: and Convincing Beyond (Jues- ? Vs Announced at the Beginning, this sale is for a Limited time,
tion of Doubt. Our protection sale is pronounced by all the £ Positively Closing Saturday Night, July 3rd. However, there
Greatest Saving Event of Years, Appealing to men who Appre­ is ample time for every one to take advantage of the Radical
Reductions Mado all Lines
ciate High Grade Merchandise for Less
« ..
.
. -
Men’s Trousers Less 20 Pr. Ct.
«
|
•
A
•
1
if . . .
e __
$12-15 Shoes for $7.95 | 20
AH
Men’s $4.00
Trousers now $ 3.20
f Men’s C Tan
and r Mahogany
brown
. . .
5. _ «
«
X Cl
l
1
1* L t k “ t
4.00 ? Shoes, Staple or English C 7 A O F * R
All Men's $5.00
4.80 i lasts. While they last
All Men's $6.00
All Men’ s $7.00
5 .6 0 1
Boys’ Hats and Caps
All Men’s $8.00
6'4° I All styles boys’ hats and c a p s-
All Men’s $9.00
All Men’s $10.00
10.00 t
/ z ' 50’ w and U 5 U
All Men's $12.50
12.00 |
Less 20 p r . c t,
All Men’s $15.00
44
44
Men s Hats
Boy’s Knicker Pants,
Woolen, ('ortlnroy and
Blue Series, Anoa 6 to
16 years
One lot Men’s $2.50 to
Less 2 0 pr. ct.
$ 1 .8 5
FOR SEVEN MORE
DAYS CLOSING SATUR
DAY, JlltY 3RD
A. 1
i
.A
e
11
rv
pr. ct. Off Men’s Dress Shoes
Ail Men’s $100 Shoes now $ 8.00
u
I Ail Men’s $12.00
9.30
44
| All
Men’s $13.50
10.80
44
12.00
I a ii Men;s $15.00
44
12.80
! {
44
5.20
44
v m
6.00
44
I All Boys $8.50
6.80
4 4
f All Boys $10.00
8.00
It IMI9 « « 1 1 t t 4 ‘t * a * A* * * a A ò ò t ò * ' :" * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ,>* ^ * * * * * * * ' >'*t > > > a t * a > a * a ,M* * * * A A A * AAAJ>A‘%A* aAri*“ ,Ml^ W
Boys’ Pants
•M"M' W "!' •> W -'.' v -X -!' •X“ !*
A.
S 1 price<1 / ; f ",a:3 a - .${35^ $2-00’ I Sii soys
44
OOOddOOOOOOOOOOO O tt
. . . . . . .
$5.00 Hats, Black and
Colors
Men’s $1.00
B. V. D. and Poros
Poros Knit two-piece
underwear, will n o t
last long at
4 5 C Each
Men’s Tan Sox
Men’s
50c
Lisle sox, our regular
Medium and lijrht wt.
Suspenders.
Ten doz.
65c seller
in the lot
, One lot men's seamless
.3 Prs. $ 1 .0 0
2 5 C Pair
Men’s Army Shoes
Regular $8. $8.50 $9.00
Black or Tan Munsing
last Army shoes
$ 5 -9 5
v -!-X -X -!MX ,v-î**>’X v ,X -X * v v ,X -> *X ,-K MX -X *
Salem Woolen Mills Store
HIGH GRADE CLOTHING
“JURT RIGHT” SHOES
Stetson, Mallory Hats
From th?l poorest republic in the
world to the richest is what tourists
travel did for Switzerland. Tnat little?
republic pOuctically unknown a century
ico is now recognized the world over
is a playground for tourists because
Tts scenic beauties were capitalized.
Data showing what the tourist busi­
ness has done for ¡i\v Itzerland has been
prepared by Alfred A. Aya representing
he Swift interests in Oregon and
«urned over to the Oregon State t’ ham-
ber of Commerce to be used in conneo
tonwith Its state-wide expansion cam­
paign now in progress.
It has a direct bearing on the cam­
paign by reason of the fact that one of
he chief arguments being used by the
State Chamber is that cities are spend­
ing huge sums to advertise their In­
terests along civic industrial lines.
In the article prepared by Mr. Aya
showing the economic value of touri3t
ravel he says:
“ It is estimated that tourists ac­
tually «w d more than $750,000,006 in
the t inted States. Of this sum It is
estimated Maine and Colorado receivo
•lose to $50.000.000; the New England
nates close to $100.000.000; Florida
close to $200.000.000 and southern Cali­
fornia close to $300,000,000— while in
"J18 it was estimated that Oregou with
scenery second to none in the world
received less than $5.040.000 from this
source.
• The best example in the world c f the
possibilities of the tourist business to
Switzerland, with an area of 1V"65
square miles, or about, one-third larger
than Harney county In eastern Oregon.
"The Swiss did not consciously begin
development of the tourist Jmsin* ss
until about 140 y a rn ago, starting
with the single guest lr. the «pare
room until today the little reiniblto
ha*, according to the latest hotel guide,
9r,9 hotels ard doubles Its population
annually through the tourists. It Is
said the little village of Si. Moritz has
few over fifty r.. live population, but
2700 beda for tout ists.”
Specific ckles cited by the ^tatn
to advertise their poasiblllties iuclude
, Chamber that are spending huge sum*
San Francisco which Is now raising •
fund of $550.000; Seattle now engar
[ in raising $260.000 and New Orle
which put $100,000 into an advert
campaign.
eye ¿ a
.