The Stayton mail. (Stayton, Marion County, Or.) 1895-current, July 24, 1919, Image 4

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FEW
Happiness Never a Thing One
Lightly Caste Away.
NEW PHRASES COINED
a t w a ."— —
“ Why?" I questioned at laet— "why
And ao this la the answer to my
are you afraid to take your chance— friend and to other friends o f tulpe:
to be happy?"
Never he afraid to grasp at happi­
Tee Beautiful, Even Though Ivanee
“ Because," answered my friend, and ness because It may uot last. For hap­
oent, to Be Paeeed By When On«
her eye« looked far away— past the car piness Is as beautiful as the flowers of
May Held I t If Only
and the rain, even—“ because Put spring and the sky of i-umtner and
for the Moment
the vivid leave« of autumn And even
afraid that It won't last 1"
When It la autumn and the leave« though It might not lust, happiness la
We were coming home from a din­ are crimson aud gold-colored and very too beautiful to pass by with never a
ner party together, my frleud and I. j beautiful, we kuow, even as we admire glance.
It was late at night and rather rainy,! them, that they will be brown and
And then, as the philosopher said,
and as we sat together In the damp, withered some day. Hut that does not and ns we know, dou't be sure, as you
almost empty trolley car, my friend keep us from loving their glorious col­ take your ohanco at happlneaa, that It
will not stay. Look around your dr-
spoke very suddenly and seriously, ors.
writes Margaret E. Sangster In the j
It'» like that, too, with flowers, and d e o f frteuds, look at your business
Christian Herald.
springtime, and the blue sky of sum­ associates, look at the casual crowds
“ Just now," she said, “ Pve a chance mer. We know that the flowers will aud uote the average o f happy faces Isj
to b« very happy. But I'm almost fade away and that sprlugtluie will go rather high. You'll see more niii II os , 1
and that there will he winter storm think, than frowns; more merry faces]
afraid to take It I"
The,rain hoat-ln a f utile manner 1 cloud* where there were once sparkles than sad ones 1
In That Respect the Recent Appalling
Conflict May Be Considered to
Have Been Tame.
K
\
In one particular It was not the
(r e a teat war In history.
Wo know that more men loot their
lives, more soldier* were In battle aud
more money w aa spout than In any pre­
vious war.
Hut colo>.vil a* wa* the conflict In
other resp«*ots. It was quite tame 111
Its supply of new words and new
phrases. “Girard" write« In the 1'htla-
delphla Press.
Hardly a word came Into the Lin­
gua;;'' ns the result of four years of
appalling disaster.
Only a few new expressions were
born.
Even In the matter o f war song*
tlds Herman war was different.
It was more sentimental and less
militant than some great wars of the
past.
Of all new English phrases coined
Since that memorable August, 1014.
“ Over the top.” is by far the nio*t
frequently quoted and the most slg-
nlAeant.
It Is now In general use to expresa
an emphatic finish. Hut what other
did we get?
Of course, we had the “ Hun.” hut
that was old. and it lacked the punch
®f originality.
It didn't carry the hatred and sting
that went with what onr ancestors
called the Hessian, nor the father*
baptised the Copperhead.
“ Pacifist” was entirely new. hut that
lacks the venom that signified “ Tory”
o f the Revolution and even yet carries
©n with that phrase In this country.
Tlie South got many a wild curtain
call with Its telling phrase, “ Northern
Mudsills.”
“ Doughface” was a highly expressive
title that still reeks with the campaign
against slavery and was first used by
John Randolph of Virginia.
Oliver P. Morton's graphic phrase,
“ waving the bloody shirt,” had a whole
bootful of meanlngTiehind it and real­
ly summed up a great national tssue.
Since the Mexican war “ Greaser”
has been a fighting word from the
month of the Kto Grande to the Guif
o f California.
Gen. Ben Hntler's Interpretation of
the status of a negro during the Civil
war gave an entirely new meaning to
the word “contraband.”
No unit of this new and greater
American army had a title that will
•tick longer than did that of the
“ Bucktalls.”
No general In any of the allied arm­
ies won a sobriquet to match that of
“ Stonewall" Jackson of the Confed­
erate hosts.
A presidential cnmpalgn In 1840
was keyed upon the slogan, “T ipp er*
poe and Tyler, too." the "Tippecanoe”
being old General Harrison, who won
the name and his fame in Indian for­
ays.
ee
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Just One LINIMENT
And that Is
All others are "just as tfood” but
J
Watkins
M. W. ItOWLEY.
Will cull on you soon.
•
331 North Liberty Street, Salem, Ore.
2
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• • • •• a »»««»««»«***************
••••••••••••••••••••••
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SALEM’S
TIRE MAN
Q uack
United States anti Pennsylvania Tirea
Solid Truck t iros
Retreading and Repair W ork
NOTE:
The best equipped repuir »hop this »¡tie of Portland.
Full Line of Accessories und Oils
2 1 9 N. C O M 'L. S T ,
SALEM . ORE
“ S o m e S a v in g !” says the
G ood Judge
J ' Tr/OMA ( -
The Mail is $1.50 a Year
“ THE CLADEK GARAGE”
Why Didn’t Th»y Think of That?
Officer — The ground was simply
shocking after the ruin; we thought
the battle would have to be post­
poned.
Lady — Well, do you know, we
were In the same predicament the day
of our Bed Cross festival, but we had
the foresight to cover the ground with
atraw.—London Opinion.
Two Way«.
“Wasn’t »he opposed wh«n she start­
ed out as a professional whlatler?"
“ Tea, but now she can crow over
U."
AND MACHINE SHOP
ACETYLENE WELDING
You men are saving
every cent you can. You
oughl to know that this
quality tobacco costs less
to chew—not more!
You take a sm aller
chew. It gives you the
good tobacco taste. It
lasts and lasts. You
don’t need a fresh chew
so often.
THE REAL TOBACCO CHEW
Put up in two ftylrs
R I G H T C U T i» a short-cut tobacco
W -B C U T is a long fine-cut tobacco
AND BRAZING
OVERHALL CARS
California Writer Arises In Wrath to
Deny That Seventy-Two 8hould
Be Considered a “ Ripe
Old Age.”
A newspaper Item, a few days agot
Stated that a certain man named So-
and-So died "at the ripe old age of
■eventy-two.”
Commenting on this the Los Angeles
Times says that seventy-two la not a
ripe old age and adds:
A ripe old age la an age when the
person who has attained It la ready for
•Id Father Time to come along and
pluck him from the tree of life. If you
will take a bird's-eye view of the ac­
tivities of the world at the present
hour, or even If you will look about
yon in your own community, you wtU
■ee that men and women of aeventy-
two are among the foremost bustlers
everywhere.
AcUve heads of great nations, big
business men In the biggest businesses,
leaders and go-getters of all descrip­
tions In every direction you look have
passed the seventy-two mark and are
•till going strong.
Why, a man should be about at his
best at the age of seventy-two. And
It Is at that age that woman should
really begin to enjoy life In hlgh-
beeled shoes, short skirts and a hat
With rose* all over It.
Cato did not begin the study of
Greek until he was eighty years of age,
and It was at the same age that Plu­
tarch began the study of Latin.
Hobbes, the English philosopher, pufr
llshed his best book when he was eigh­
ty-seven, and Chevreul, forever Immor­
tal In scientific research, was busy as
a bee at his work In his one hundred
and second year.
One o f the most active lawyers of
the Los Angeles county bar is past his
ninetieth year, and we know of anoth­
er Los Angeles man who has Just been
appointed cashier of a new bank at the
age of seventy-fonr.
In short, the cold fact Is that seven­
ty-two is very fttr Indeed from being
“ a ripe o’-d age."
agalnat the car window«. TTTateEid to
It for a moment before 1 »poke.
This is Your
Chance
FIX FORDS
All Kinds of Repairing done at
Reasonable Rates
Battery Charging. A ll kinds o f assessories.
Gas and Oils for sale
The Peoples Cash Store. Salem, is now
inaugurating a Saturday Sale o f Groceries,
Dry Goods, Clothing, Men's Furnishing, etc.
Hundreds o f every-day needs are included
to make it a sale for every member o f the
family. Here are some o f the items-
All my work is Guaranteed First Class
CHAS. CLAD EK,
STAYTO N , ORE.
G ro c e rie s
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Dayton Bicycles
Easy Riding
Built for Service
]
B e st in th e L o n g R u n
-FOR SALE BY
I’eanut butter, lb ..................
Soda, oyster and graham crackers
Mixed cookies lh ........
No. 10 blue K aro.................
10 lbs corn meal
Corn flake», pkg
Lima beans, 2 lha ..............
White beans, lb
10 lbs rolled oat» ..........
.
14c
17c
18c
65c
9c
25c
Salem, Oregon 5
I Lloyd E. Ramsden
£
100 lbs good cane sugar, with other
Groceries................................... .$ 9 40
2 80
Hard wheat flour, per sack.........
Soft wheat flour, per sack............. . 2 65
Head rice ..................................... ... 11c
8c
Broken rice ................... ............
2 25
Cooking oil per gal ......................
40c
Coffee, a very good quality............
Tomatoes, standard pack.............
387 COURT STREET
T
Liberty^ Bonds Taken at Full Face Value
L a a M M M M M k M I lM ilW ir M M k M llM - « M É M N M N M M m J Ì
New Splint Works Well.
Tbe treatment of broken and other­
wise Injnred arms hns been somewhat
facilitated by the Invention of a new
splint, which Is s ....... nlcnl device
ready for Instant use in any case with­
out regard to Its character. It Is In
war, where n great number of cases
are to he treated as quickly ns possible, |
that this new device will be of the
greatest value. It is adjusted to the
body of the patient. It can he n«ed
on either arm and may be adjusted to
any position In which It may he de
sired to hold the Injured arm. It is
n combination of metal rod«, with suit­
able Joints and hinges, so that the arm
Is properly supported and protected at
all times.
.*
BE A LEADER
A
u n it a n d great
leader It/li
h n whole
community
and
h j l an entire n a tio n —E l »
An immense problem in reconstruction confronts the present generation.
Are you doing your utmost to prepare to lead in its solution?
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Oregon Agricultural College
Tr.in* for ItadfMhip in the indu«trie. .nd profm iens a. follow. .
HOME ECO NO M ICS. A G R IC U L T U R E . C O M M E R C E . F O R E S T R Y . P H A R M A C Y M U SIC .
V O C A T IO N A L F.D U C ATIO N . C IV IL E N G IN E E R IN G . E L E C T R IC A L E N G IN E E R IN G .
M E C H A N IC A L E N G IN E E R IN G . C H E M IC A L E N G IN E E R IN G - I N D U S T R I A L A R T S .
M IN IN G E N G IN E E R IN G . L O G G IN G E N G IN E E R IN G . M I L I T A R Y S C IE N C E
Th'- Collet- tr.im r.f n-t id-« rourtr* in Enfli.h, Econonucs, A ft, M ath-m alici, Modern Languag-e,
Phy.icat Education, Industrial Journalism. Natural Sciences, and all esaential. of an education.
Three regular terms—Fall term begins September 22, 1919
■ / .'• u ■♦y Æ
./ieutJU'x
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»TT-
$35 Men’s Suits
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$15.98
$8 woolen serge pants
-
5.49
Khaki pants
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$1.19
M en’s blue shirts
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98c
Sport shirts
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69c
Special Discounts to campers
cTWanagement
The Peoples Cash Store
For College C »**lo f. Illustrated Booklet and other information addrr»«
T H E R E G IS T R A R . Oregon Agricultural College. Cor valli»
S it»'
Clothing Values
'« ' Y
186-194 North Commercial St.
Salem, Oregon
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