The Redmond spokesman. (Redmond, Crook County, Or.) 1910-current, May 28, 1914, Image 1

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    Redmond Spokesman
Published at the “ Hub City” o f Central Oregon
m i * 4.
No. 17
REDMOND, CROOK C O U N T Y . O REGON, T H U R S D A Y . M AY 28. 1014
'PEALS TO HIM
f. Grnhiim of the* li. \. Ko,id
fell» About'the Kctlmnntl
<«>mmci<i,il Huit
IDS O U T
NICK
L IN E
C O M P L IM E N T S FOR I S
l» r »
Farmer* In Ih it Sec-
Util of the Stale to Save Sam
i of Their Produrlo for Ex
Helium and Land Shows
W Graham. Mi-stern Industrial
[Immigration A |n l of <lt« Oroot
h- rn Hulls ay. « « ■ in iaortlaii(t
s..-k on hi* return from ('m ira i
(on Speaking of the mtlvltv of
h meritai liuti* of l'entrai tin
he salti
t* Jmulid has one of the ntoat tip.
e minute commercial or rain «a
I of any I have seen In the
li.seat. for a loan of Its alu-
r have a membership of about
Includine many farinera, to
m a special rate la made They
a larjte ground floor rtMitu. S ti
f< et. on the main street, which la
y open during the day and even­
ti la being made a social t en-
meeting place and rest room for
ryone. and visitors are welcomed
wives and families of farmers
I 1
who tome In to do their trading flnd
H a convenient resting plate and a
plate to meet and become better ar
■lualnti'd with each other
Newcom­
ers are especially welcomed and art*
mude to feel lit home
| consider
It one of the most practical and far-
reaching, In Its beneficial results, of
any commercial club proposition In
t'entrai Oregon
Kvery Monday the
club has a noon luncheon at which
an average of 5o business men and
farmers attend anil business |a*rtl-
tient unit to the betterment of Ited-
mond ami the surrounding country
Is discussed The luncheons ure ro­
tated between the two hotels and the
leading restaurant
The walls of
the club room are being utilised for
an exhibit of agricultural products.
It Is the Intention to awaken a spir­
ited Interest on the part of the farm­
ers to bring In samples of their best
grains, grasses, potatoes, etc , and
by the end of the season a large rep­
resentative collection will have been
assembled A permanent exhibit will
be maintained, and the surplus ex­
hibit material will he available for
further use at the Panam-Parlflr Ex-
poaltlon at Kan Franclacu and for
exhibit at the dllTerent eastern land
shows and exhibition cars In the
Hast This fall and next winter and
all of next year there will be greater
opportunities for the display of Cen­
tral Oregon agricultural products
than ever before, and this will be the
means of showing to the outside
world what the possibilities of the
Central Oregon country are
"The Hedmond people are deter­
mined that this section of the state
shall be well represented at Kan
Francisco and other places where
people are Interested In seeing what
the roast section of the I'nltcd
Ktates can produce
"The Fast Is full of people who
are dissatisfied with their present
• ondulons and are looking for new
locations
Thousands of them will
take advantage of the Han Franrlsco
fair to visit that exposition and see
Continued on Page 3
HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
GAVE A BANQUET
Complaints
S E T T L E R S M A Y C U T $50
W ORTH O F W OOD FOR USE
About 65 person» were present at
the banquet given last Thursday eve­
ning by the lllgh School pupils of
tills city
Those present were the
pupils, their parents, the teachers,
the ssbool board and Invited guests
Owing to sickness of various kinds
In the city a number were prevented
from attending the ceremonies
At about V o'clock the guests as­
sembled at daintily prepared tables,
decorated In the high school colors
yellow and green ut which Klchard
With ox presided aa toastmaster
Toasts were responded to by mem­
bers of the various classes, the fac-
ul'y and school board. Glrla from
the fourth room waited on the tablea
Miss (Sladys Jackson gave a read­
ing. Miss Frames Thompson a vocal
selection, and Miss Kvelyn Smith an
Instrumental solo. Following the
toasts Miss l.tirllle Hedmond. on be­
half of the pupils of the school, pre­
sented Professor J A. Thompson,
the retiring principal, and Miss Iiunn
with a slight token of their thanks
lor all they had done for them In the
way of educational advancement dur­
ing the past year.
It Is the Intention of the pupils to
accept this event as a precedent and
give an annual banquet each year at
the close of the school term.
the
Oregon and Western
Colonization Company
A N D G R A IN L A N D S
VI HIGH W IL L RE SO LD AT L O W PRICES. ON E A S Y TERMS.
S E N D FOR IL L U S T R A T E D L IT E R A T U R E .
I D ESIR E TO G E T IN TO C O M M U N IC A T IO N W IT H PERSO N S
W H O DESIR E TO B E T T E R T H E IR C O N D IT IO N , A N D A S SU R E
TH E M T H A T I C A N S E L L T H E M L A N D T H A T W I L L M E E T
T H E IR A P P R O V A L .
I. W. G R A Y
R ED M O N D ,
O R EG O N
........................................................................ $ 2,1,000.00
Surplus .................................................................
1/»d iv id e d P r u f f t s .................................................
Steak h olders' I.la b ility .......................................
T o ta l
by Tlielr 1‘uplls
I. W . G R A Y
800,000 AC R ES O F FRUIT, A L F A L F A
By Wood Cutters
C a p ita l
Affair— Teacher» Itemeinla-red
.
f«r
Being Received By
Authorities of Trespass
.........." L
Atcrnt
In cold, uriaasumlng figures, here is our guarantee to every de­
positor, regardless of the amount he may have In the bank:
i m i M H M i: AT EVENT
............
------- ^ r =
PROTECTION
M MIU.lt OF ÜI FKTH WERK IN
Will Make the Banquet no Annual
$1.50 PER Y E A R
.............................................................
I ,250.00
I ,.100.00
2.1.000.00
.$.12.750.00
353,750.00— That amount atands between your deposits and any
posaible loss.
This bank wants your business. We offer the greatest protection
in this community, by far the strongest factor of safety.
Law Is Very Stringent on This
DIKKC'TORS:
Subject and Penalty Is Severe
— Department
Will
Furnish
J. BARR
L. E. SMITH
GUY K. DOBSON
B A. KENDALL
J. W BREWER
Necessary Data
Redmond Bank of Commerce
“ I have received numerous com­
plaints of a great deal of petty tim­
ber trespass by various parties in
( ’ rook county, who have been taking
wood from Carey Act lands for their
.iw n use, and also from other govern­
ment! inds for oale. It appears that
most of these parties are Ignorant of
the law, and that It is a custom that
has gradually grown up from the
ciavs when there were but few set­
tlers and they took what wood they
wanted from where they could get
It. New, however, conditions have
changed and the custom has grown
to such proportions that It must be
stop; "d. because it Is III violation of
law and also not for the best Inter­
est of the community. I do not wish
to see anyone prosecuted simply on
ucroun? of his Ignorance. I wish to
give a warning to all before any fur­
ther rteps are taken.
Several times recently I have re­
ceived complaints that different par­
ties have been cutting wood from va­
cant lands and Carey Act segregated
lands for sale In the Deschutes val­
ley and near there. The ownership
of -jurh lands rests In the govern­
ment until patent Is Issued, and the
General I-and Office has supervision
of them until that time, ’ and Is
charged with the duty of protecting
the timber on these lands and of
prosecuting any persons taking the
timber unlawfully.
"The only person who is allowed
to sell wood or timber from unpat­
ented lands la a homestead entry-
man, and he Is allowed to cut and
sell only for the purpose of clearing
the timber from the lands for culti­
vation. He cannot cut and sell from
lands which he does not expect to
cultivate, and If he does not follow
the cutting by actual cultivation
within a reasonable time he Is liable
for tresspass, and may be compelled
to pay the government the full mar­
ket value of the wood sold. In ad­
dition to paying for the wood or
timber, he is liable to criminal prose­
cution for cutting for sale, and If
convicted Is subject to fine and Im­
prisonment.
As stated above, the
timber belongs to the government
and when unlawfully cut may be
setxed wherever found. In the wood-
house of the purchaser, or on a rail­
road car, or If sawed into lumber
the last purchaser may be called on
to pay for It even after built Into a
house. The government is not barred
from recovering Its property by the
lapse of time nor by sale, even to an
Innocent purchaser.
"Any person who has no wood of
his own may cut for his own use
only, front vacant public land, pro­
vided he takea not over $50 worth In
any one year, and that he first notify
the Chief of Field Division of the
General Ijtnd Office, giving a descrip­
tion of the lands where he wishes
to get his wood, and shows that he
has no wood of his own and needs It
for his own use, And not for sale or
export. Several persona may join to­
gether In having one agent to get
their wood for them and Jointly may
get over the $50 limit, by first get­
ting a permit from the Chief of Field
Division.
"AM lands segregated under the
Carey Act are not public lands In
that they have been withdrawn from
entry for the use of the state, which
has agreed to reclaim them, and to
have them settled upon. The only
person who can cut and sell wood
from these lands Is the Carey Act
settler who Is clearing the land, who
Continued on Page 2
R ED M O N D ,
OREGON
I
TELLS ABOUT US A BIG
J. T. Hardy Says That Crops in Large
Force of Men Now Em-
Central Oregon Are Much
ployed on the Initial
Earlier This Season
State Project
ALFALFA
T R IA L
HAS
$260.000 O F TH E F U N D
PR O V E N BIG SU C CE SS
H A S SO F A R B E E N U S E D
Good Soaking Rains at Intervals Seven and a Half Miles of the
Have Occurred and Farmers
Feed
Especially
Creek
Newcomers
Are
Jubilant Over Crop Outlook
Canal
From
Tumalo
to the Reservoir Has
Been Completed to Date
Project Engineer O, Lauregaard,
J. T. Hardy, Traveling Freight
and Passenger Agent of the Oregon in charge of the Tumalo Project, the
Trunk Railway, while In Redmond initial irrigation project that the
last week had the following to say state has taken hold of to put for­
to a representative of The Spokes­ ward to completion. In a recent inter­
man In regard to crop conditions for view in a Portland paper, says:
"Practically all the supplies hav®
the present year:
“ Never before have I seen such been bought from Portland houses,"
crops in Central Oregon at this time he said. "From 300 to 400 men will
of year. The season is earlier than have been employed on the project
usual, on account of warmer weather for a year and a half when it is com­
and frequent rains, and the crops pleted. It will support about 3,000
look fine everywhere. Good, soaking persons living ou ranches when the
rains at intervals have occurred, and job Is done, and will be a perpetual
the farmers, especially the new asset to Portland. Settlers will have
homesteaders, are jubilant over the to pay from $38 to $40 an acre for
the land, one-tenth cash and the bal­
prospects of good yields.
"In the dry land district the crops ance In ten years, and if they culti­
lok equally aa well as in the Irrigated vate one-third of their land each
districts, due to haring received an year for the first three years, the
unusual quantity of natural mois­ payments for those years may be de-
fered to allow them to put their
ture.
"The farmers In this region are money into stock and Implement*
pursuing better farming methods when they need them most.
"An appropriation of $4 50,000 was
each year, and the general belief is
that to this Is due the present excep­ made by the last legislature to irri­
tionally good crop showings. An In­ gate land in Central Oregon about
creased amount of new ground is be­ seven and a half miles from Bend.
ing broken up and put into crops. It was to straighten up the old Co­
The acreage this year in cultivation lumbia Southern Project.
"Since last July there has been
will exceed that of any previous year.
"During the spring the Oregon new hope and prosperity In that part
The water rights
Trunk Railroad gave out to dry land of the country.
farmers enough alfalfa seed to plant have been straightened up and the
By
an acre as an experiment. Every people feel vastly encouraged.
farmer who would agree to plant It the way, it is the only project of Its
was given enough seed to plant an kind In the Cnlted States that is be­
acre. Those who did so are well ing built with state money.
"T o date we have spent about
pleased with the experiment and the
$360,000 of the appropriation and
r.lfajfa Is showing up finely.
"In the Irrigated districts, where we have completed seven and a half
alfalfa Is being raised more exten­ miles of the feed canal from Tumalo
sively, the farmers are raising hogs.: creek to the reservoir. The feed
and averaging a car per week to the canal is of permanent construction,
Portland market. During the fall concrete lined, and with concrete
months this district will raise and structures, that Is, drops, turnouts,
ship as many hogs as any other dis­ weirs and diversion gates, besides
6,500 lineal feet of metal flume
trict of similar size in the state.
"Quite a number of farmers have manufactured by a Portland concern.
turned their attention to dairying, t The cement used is furnished by a
with the result that creameries have Portland concern which was awarded
been established at Redmond, Prlne- the contract after four companies
vllle and Bend, which are already on j which had made the same price had
aubmltted their cement for a test.
a satisfactory paying basis.
“ We are working on the two dams
"More genuine settlers are coming
Into Central Oregon than usual, and which will form the Tumalo reser-
Conttnued on Page 3
Continued on page 4