The Redmond spokesman. (Redmond, Crook County, Or.) 1910-current, December 15, 1910, Image 1

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    BEEN BROUGHT
-J
ainst the Late
Editors of Cit­
izens Call
HAD
A
HEARING
AT
PRINEVILLE
Bound Over to Grand Jury
^ In the Sum of $250
Individually
Th c following in taken from the
Prin. ville Journal of the 8th:
J . A.
HolTman, G.
I’
More
ip id . L. I). Wieat, R. V. Con-
•Ubl'-. Ren Cotter, E. A. Hunt
|Eurl Renton, committee on
lication of the Citizens’ Go k 1
G ive nment League ami editors
-O f th- ('itizens* Call, are made
'defer ulants in a sensational ac­
tion for criminal libel I* gun in
the Justice court at I’ rineville on
Monday. The defendants were
iervr I with warrants and are
now nominally under arrest.
Th- casus belli is a statement
alleged to have heen printed in
tli*> Citizens’ Call in its issue of
Novendier ¡fit, which stat<*ment,
the complaint avers, constitutes
criminal liliel under the Oregon
statutes. The alleged libelous
matter is directed against Sher­
iff Frank Klkius and William
Comba, and read as follows:
“ After an effective demonstra­
tion by the Law and Order pr o-
pie, comprised of I’ rineville's
best citizens, indictments were
returned against the two lending
politicians. One was Sheriff El-
kins, who, it seems, when occa­
sion demands it, makes it his
business to vote at both Madras
anti I’ rineville. The other was
Rill Combs, who cun, w hen occa­
sion requires, aquire a legal resi­
dence within sixty days. Yet,
shie d ti by the protecting arm of
Rrother John, lie manages al-
wuys to keep out of trouble.”
The paper containing the ar­
ticle is dated November 21) on
tho first page and October 21).
which is the true dat«*, on page
2. At that time the ( all was not
a newspaper, being merely cam-
tiaign literature.
Since then,
however, Hoffman, th«* man in
ehurge. has applied for its admis­
sion to the mails as second class
mutter, it thereby becoming u
real newspaper.' The Call has no
property of its own, the mechan­
ical work being done at the office
of the Oregon Hub, at Redmond.
The defendants are widely
scattered. I- I). Wiest lives at
Bei d, Hoffman, Goiter» Hunt
and Renton live at or near Red­
mond. K. V’. Constable isa I’ rine­
ville resident, while (I. T. More-
head, who is a minister o f the
(ios pel, until recently resided at
Madras.
He is now residing
somewhere in Sherman county
Moro, it is thought.
Service on each o f the defend­
ants was made by wire, and ail
hut Wiest offered to come when­
ever the day set for the hearing
is made known. Wiest objected
strenuously to the whole business,
until Deputy Sheriff Van devert
found it necessary to take him
into custody.
The date for the hearing has
not at this writing Tuesday
been set. but it will probaly not
Is* earlier than Saturday, so as
to allow time for all the defend­
ants to reach I’ rineville. They
are at liberty on their recogni­
zance at present.
The penalty for libel is any
where from one month’s impris­
onment in the county jail up­
ward, and finable also.
The defendants waived exami­
nation yesterday afternoon ls*fore
Justice Uernier who placed them
under bonds o f $2">0 eacli to ap­
pear before the grand jury at the
May term o f the circuit court.
- < ■»
-
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Davies
have taken charge o f the Home
R-staurant and Rakery o f this
city, and after making a number
of improvements in the place
will open this popular eating
house alsuit the 2t)th o f the
month. They will sell all kinds
o f hake goods, and patrons of
the house may be assured of
getting the best the market
a fiords.
Sjmkesman for job printing.
EHRET
COUNCIL CONSIDERS
LIQUOR QUESTION
At the regular council meeting
Tuesday night the time was »co­
pied in considering the model li­
cense liquor law, as recommed-
ed by the Greater Oregon Home
Rule Association.
The council
committee made a number o f
recommendations and suggest­
ions, to la; incorporated into a
new liquor license ordinance to
take the place o f Ordinance No.
3 now in effect.
Some o f the recommendations
were that the number o f saloons
in Redmond lie limited at the
present time to three, with a li­
cense of $800 and a bond of $l(kX).
Increase number o f saloons for
each additional 350 imputation
after January 1911. Closing of
saloons on Sunday.
Prohibiting
all kinds of gambling in saloons,
except shaking dice or playing
cards for drinks or cigars.
Under head of G > > 1 and Wel­
fare o f the city several suggest­
ions were made. J. A. Wilcox
asked that an ordinance la? drawn
prohibiting stock from running
at large, the matter o f cleaning
up the alleys was mentioned, and
a complaint for excessive charge
of digging ditches for laying of
water pijie were made.
*
-
—
A new booth has been put in
at the local telephone exchange
for the convenience o f patrons of
the line who want to use the
long distance service.
B R O S ’.
Department Store
WHEN YOU SEE IT IN OUR AD IT’S SO
The mission of our advertisements is to tell you our store news.
It is an
economical method by which we can talk to ALL the people at once.
How­
ever, our advertising will not be effective, will not bring visitors and cus­
tomers to the store, unless it is believed.
Therefore, as a sensible business proposition, it behooves us to state only
the truth about our store and merchandise.
In adhering to this principle, we have n right to expect that our printed
announcements w ill be believed— believed implicitly— and we promise you
here never to publish an untruth, no matter how great the temptation may
be for us to meet the advertisements of other stores.
LARGEST STOCK OF THESE GOODS
EVER SHOWN IN THIS SECTION
W e have now on exhibition a complete stock of the above
goods from the cheap toys to the costly presents.
Some­
thing for young and old, and we have priced them so that
they are within the reach of all.
COME AND M AKE YOUR SELECTION EAR LY W H ILE
THE STOCK IS COMPLETE*
W E W IL L STORE THEM
FREE OF CHARGE FOR YOU.
RATING APPLES
The nicest stock of Choice Eating Apples in the city.
they are gone.
e*.
Come before
Prices are moderate
FINE LINE OF GROCERIES FOR THE HOLIDAY TRADE
PASSES AWAY
John Sisemore of
Bend, Goes to
Great Beyond
O N E OF THE EARLY
SETTLERS OF COUNTY
His Life Story Reads Like
Special Offer
Until Christmas
Men’s Suits, regular price $12.50 reduced to $11.25
17.50
“
15.50
18.00
1“
16.00
20.00
“
17.50
22.50
20.00
25.00
“
22.50
27.50
“
25.00
30.00
“
27.00
44
44
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44
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44
44
44
44
44
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These are all new goods and not
shop worn
a Romance— Was
Well Known
Nic 2 Lins of Overcoats, up io date, $12.50 to $25.00
6 lb. All Wool Fresno Blankets, 02x80, $5.50
A dispatch from Grants Pass
dated Dec, 1, says:
John Sisemore o f Bend died at
the hospital here last Saturday.
Redmond, Or.
Burial was at Myrtle Creek, in a
grave beside that o f his late wife,
on Monday. His daughter. Mrs. dust. On French Prarie, in best the Sisemore ranch afforded
W. B. Johnson o f Roseburg, and Marion county, Oregon, he gath­ and urged to tarry there. But
son, L. C. Sisemore o f Port Kla­ ered a bunch of 400 steers before he would not. He resumed the
math, were with him at the end. the end o f the month and drove trail and. for all that ¡3 known
He was conscious to the last and them south to the mines, where here, reached the Black Hills and
hours before he died he asked if he sold them at a profit o f $16000. got rich again. But the chances
all hospital expenses were paid From this start he went more ex­ were vastly against it
and nurses settled with.
He tensively into the livestock busi­
Mr. Sisemore married a Mrs.
had all the care that doctors and ness, which he continued the re­ Pelto, which union resulted in in­
trained nurses could give.
mainder o f his life, though for harmony after two children had
The following history o f the the pa3t few years his holdings been born November 27, 1908, he
life of Mr. Sisemore is taken have deen confined to a few married Mr3. Susan Brewer,
from the Bend Bulletin of Dec. horses on the range in Crook whose health was frail and she
7 th:
county.
He grazed his bands died a few months later.
John Sisemore was one o f the through the Klamath country.
For a long time Mr. Sisemore
best known citizens o f Central Or­ Goose Lake Valley and Stein's had serious organic heart trouble,
egon. He came to the Deschutes mountain, making his general which it is presumed, finally pro­
in 1881 and from that time occu­ headquarters in Jackson county. duced death. He left Bend in
pied the ranch on the river a mile In the fertile Sam’ s valley there August with the expectation o f
south of Bend until 1905, when he at one time owned several ex­ going to Mexico for the winter.
he sold it to Dr. Nichol. Since tensive farms that are now worth Aftervisiting some weeks with
that time he has lived in Bend, over $2.000,000. according to an his daughter in Roseburg he pro­
where he owned considerable estimate made by Mr. Sisemore ceeded to Grants Pass to receive
property.
treatment from an eye specialist
last summer.
Mr. Sisemore was bom in Ken­ * But there came a hard winter and there became so feeble that
tucky in 1835. In 1853 he con­ in the Klamath country and he could not continue and death
cluded to move west. He spent Sisemore lost 600 head o f cattle overtook him after confinement
that winter in Utah and then and 300 head o f horses.
Then in the hospital for six weeks'
moved on to California, where he he came to the Deschutes, bought
located at Placerville.
He al­ the relinquishment o f John Todd, Hit in the Eye
ways had a keen interest in the who had settled on a homestead W ith Cable
sporting end o f the horse busi­ at Farewell Bend, entered the
E. Wagoner of this city, one
ness and in Utah he supported claim himself in 1881 and lived
o f the firm o f the Central Oregon
horseracing so enthusiastically most o f the remainder o f his life
Well Co., suffered an accident
(losing $3,700 in gold on one there. In 1906 he sold the ranch
last week that has been bothering
race) that he "went broke," to for $6.500. Since then he bought
him and causing much trouble.
use his own expression. After considerable property in Bend
He was pulling a casing in the
some time spent in Placerville. and vicinity, materially increas­
well at Culver with a cable last
Sisemore came north to Yreka. ing the value o f his possessions.
Tuesday, when the cable which
where lived a man named Felix
In 1884 Felix Roadin, the bene­ was sprung, flew up and hit him
Roadin, who owed him for hand­ factor o f Sisemore on South
in the eye. The part of the
ling a bunch o f stock in Utah. Humbug back in 1854. struk the
cable that struck him was frayed
Roadin paid the debt and Sise­ Sisemore ranch at Farewell Bend
and some of the strands struck
more gave the money to his bro­ and asked for a nights lodging.
the left eye, making a puncture.
ther and himself went to work He was then 78 years old, broken
He came to Redmond and con­
for Roadin. A short time after in health and fortune, with all
sulted Dr. Hosch. and there are
this Sisemore had an opportunity his earthly possessions on a pack
hopes of saving the eye, though
to purchase for $100 a half int­ mule, on his way to seek fortune
the eyesight may be somewhat
erest in a placer claim on South anew in the Black Hills of Da­
dim for a time.
Humbug creek. Roadin advised kota. which were occupying much
him to buy and supplied part attention. Roadin was given the
Subscribe for The Spokesman.
o f the neccessary money. Sise­
more bought and began washing
for gold. The first day he clean­
ed up $375 in dust, besides four
large nuggets. Before this be­
came known Sisemore bought
the other half o f the mine for
another $100. Then he settled
down to mining.
For two years Sisemore stuck
to his placer. It was a marve­
Postoffice Building,
lous producer.
Never did he
take out less than $50 and fre­
for nice Holiday Presents
quently as high as $1000 a day,
clear. But the cost o f living in
the mines was very high in those
in the line of
days, and Sisemore never was
content with much less than the
BOX W R ITIN G PAPERS
best. Where the gold came so
easily it went freely. Many a
time did he throw out to a
CANDIES, ETC.
French restauranteur an ounce
o f gold ($16) for each person in
a congenial supper party. And
$10 for a breakfast o f brains and
eggs at Yreka was quite the
usual thing.
On the first day o f July, 1857,
Sisemore, who was then thought
to be dying o f consumption, left
the mines with $32,000 in gold
E. L . R A P P
“ The Head to Foot Clothier.”
See Norwood
Everyth Snug1 New