The Ontario Argus. (Ontario, Or.) 1???-1947, September 28, 1922, Image 6

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    THE ONTARIO AKGUS, ONTABIO, OBEGON, THURSDAY, SEPT. 28, 1922
LOCAL PERSONALS
Tho W. C. T. U. was entertained
this week by Mrs. Newton Woods at
her homo west of town. Tho Union
decided to make a quilt to bo sent
to the Children's Farm Home at
Corvallls. Tho officers for tho
coming years who wore present,
wore Installed In a very impresslvo
coremony conducted by Mrs. Lees,
assisted by Mrs. Morton. Mrs. Bos
woll and Mrs. Wlnslow, with the
hostess had prepared a delicious
lunch. Tho October meeting will bo
a Mother's meeting, and White- Illb
bon Recruit under tho direction of
tho Child Welfare department with
Mrs. Troxell as leader.
Earl Secoy who Is a student at tho
College of Idaho, camo homo for tho
week end.
C. E. Bingham loft Sunday night
for, a business trip through southern
Idaho.
Mr. and Mrs. II. D. Jenne of Cald
woll, and C. E, Bingham drovo to
Spokano to attend a meettlng of the
managers of tho "Permanent as tho
Pyramids" concrete plpo company.
On their way homo they visited a
fow days in Ynklma and took In the
Washington stato fair.
Harry Kennard, wntermaster for
tho county, was In Ontario on busi
ness yesterday.
James A. Kylo, of Stanfield, one
of the directors of the state dovolop
mont board, Is In tho county again
on a trip of Inspection looking ovor
tho Irrigated section.
Mrs. J. A. Brown of Baker,
formorly of this city, accompanied
Mr. and Mrs. II. L. Boss on n trip
down hero Wednesday. Thoy camo
ovor Dooloy mountain and roport
tho road badly cut up and In places
somowhat dangerous. Thoy are re
turning via tho Old Oregon Trail.
E. A. Frnsor was a Baker City
visitor on Tuesday and .Wednesday.
It would rcqulro a roll call of tho
business district to roport tho num
bor of OntarJans who went to Wclsor
on Wednesday to help start tho
Wolsor Round-up, and thoy roport
od a big ttmo, too, on their return.
Mrs. J. D. Bllllngsloy entortalncd
tho Monday Brldgo club this week.
Dr. George W. Van Waters will
hold Episcopal sorvlcos at tho Ma
sonic hall on Sunday ovunlng, Oc
tober 1 to which nn Invitation to all
Is oxtondod.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Coughanour of
(lardon Vnlloy, Idaho, camo down to
Ontario to spend Fair wcok with
Mrs. Couglmnoiir's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Jacob Stroup.
Mrs. Vincent Ilyrnm of Payette
wns brought to Ontario today for
nn oporatlon for nppoudlcltls which
was successfully performed.
Oils Johnson of Wnshoo under
went nn operation nt tho hopltal to
day. Mrs. Adollno Brown received word
last woek from hor daughter, Mrs.
J. Arthur Young, now n resident of
Potndnnin, California, whoro Mr.
Voting Is n nionibor of tho High
school faculty, that thoy had bought
it homo and oxpuct to mako tho
famous chicken city tholr homo.
Mr. and Mrs. Oron Boyer nro tho
paronts of a baby boy born to thorn
on Monday. Thoy havo named tho
young man, William Oron.
Theodore Wolkor of Welsor has
taken a position at tho Ontario Plmr
macy succeeding Jack Jliuniorsnn
who loft Sunday for Palo Alto, Cali
fornia to matrlctilata at Lcland
Stanford university to routlnuo his
medlcnl course
J. W. McCullougli returned Wed
nesday from Iowa whoro ho wont to
tako depositions In a case pending
In tho district court.
P. J. dallaghor loft Monday
morning for Burns to bo presont tn
tho term of tho district court thoro.
From Burns ho oxpocts to go to
Bend to nttond tho sessions of tho
Oregon Irrigation congress.
W. H. Doollttlo loft Tuesday
morning Jor Portland on business.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. F. Cotton
of Kronen, Idaho, on Soptombor 21.
n boy.
Mrs. Cnlllo Colo roturnod homo
this wook from an oxtomled visit In
Iowa.
IlKV. 1). !) RKKSK COMKS
TO TAKE CI I AltOU OK CHURCH
Rov. D. D. Rooso who with his
family spent last winter tn Ontario,
Una accopted tho call extended htm
by tho Congregational church nnd
will begin his ministry horo Sunday
morning. During tho summor Roy.
nnd Mrs. Rooso havo lived on their
liomostoail In Wyoming whoro ho
was in charge of tho mission field.
CARDS OK THANKS
Wo tako this moans of expressing
our sincere thanks nnd appreciation
to tho firemen nntl nil others who so
gouerously help u nfter tho loss of
our housoliold goods.
Mrs. M. J. Nooco ninl family.
KOR RENT Five room houso with
bath. T35 por month. Inquire
43 W,
M. K. CHUnCH NOTICE
10 a. m. Sunday school session.
11 a. m. morning worship. Ser
mon by pastor.
6:45 p. m. Epworth League. All
young peoplo cordially Invited.
7:30 p. m. ovcnlng service of Bong
led by tho choir. Sermon by tho
pastor.
Ladles Aid meets at home of Mrs.
Draper Thursday afternoon.
Official board meeting Tuesday
evening, Oct. 3, at 7:30.
A. A. James, pastor.
All Sections of County Interested
In Fair as Demonstrated by Winners
(Continued from page ono)
Cow, under 2 ovor 1 year Aloys
Schuler, first, no second.
Cow under 1 year Vest Bland,
Ontario, first, no second.
Champion Bull Aloys Schuler.
Champion cow Aloys Schuler.
Jersey Division
Bull 2 years and over W. P. Join
or of New Plymoutr 1st, F. W. Trlu
kol of Ontario 2nd.
Bull under 2 years over 1 C. II.
Sargent of Frultland, first; Dr. E,
S. Fortner of Ontario, second.
Bull under ono year C. H. Sar
gent, first and second.
Aged cow W. P. Joinor, first;
C. H. Sargent second.
Cow under two over one C. H.
Sargent first, Elmer Dorothy, Fruit
land, second.
Cow under ono year C. H. Sar
gont first and second.
Champion bull W. P. Joinor.
Champion cow C. II. Sargent.
Diiroc Swine
Duroc Jersey aged boar H. A.
Caporton, Payette, first, no second.
Sow ono year undor two H. A.
Caperton, Payette, first; no second.
Ollt undor eight months Turner
Bros, of Wolsor, first; no second.
Four pigs of one litter H. A.
Caporton first; no second.
Poland Clitiias
Aged- boar F. W. Trlnkol, On
tario, first; J. B. Qulzenborry, Vnle,
second.
Boar, ono year under two F. W,
Trlnkel, first; P. II. Ennls, Ontario,
second.
Boar, undor eight months Bon
Rose, Ontario, first; no second.
Agen Sow F. W. Trlnkol, first
and second.
Sow, one year undor two F. W.
Trlnkol, first and second.
Gilt, undor eight months Bon
Roso, first; Clifford Putnam, Pay
eteo second.
Hord ono boar and two sows F.
W. Trlnkol, first and second.
Four pigs of ono litter Bon Roso
first; David Chndwlck.Ontnrlo, 2nd.
Sweepstakes
Boar ono yoar or ovor F. W.
Trlnkol of Ontario.
Sow ono yoar of ovor F. W. Trln
kol of Ontario.
Hompshtrcs
E. Williams of Ontario was tho
only exhibitor of Hampshire swine.
Ho won tho following classes: First
on ngod boar; first nnd second on
boar ono year undor two; first on
ngod sow; first and second on gilt
under olght months; first on four
pigs of one litter.
liVult Awards Applt-s
uost live pinto display nny l va
riety Hans Oft Ontario, first; Otto
Miller, Payette, second.
Best vnrloty ono pinto display (3)
of moro varieties) Hans Oft, first;
Ottto Miller, socond.
Best throe box oxhlblt (nny ono
variety) I. I. Culberttson, Payette,
first; Otto Millar, second.
Host ono box exhibit 'of threo or
moro vnrlotios I. I. Culbcrtson, 1st
Otto Miller socond.
Best slnglo box oxhlblt Otto Mil
ler, first; I, I. Culbcrtson, second.
I Yum
Host flvo plato dlsplny of any one
variety J. E. DIckorson of Big Bend
district, first; Chns. Johnson, Ontar
io, second.
Best exhibit boxed pears A. A.
Reed" of Brognn first; no socond,
lYniiies
Bost ono pinto display, threo or
moro varieties W. P. Klost of Pay
oteo, first; C. E. Dlbblo, Payette, 2nd
Bost exhibit boxed poaches F.
Klines of Harper, Ore, first; W. W.
Howard of Payette, second.
Grapes
Bost 'pinto, of grapes H. K.
Thorpo of Ontario, first; Chas. John
sou, Ontario, second.
Plums
Rest plato display Otto Miller
First; I. I. Culbortson second.
Trillion
. . Best ono plato display Guy
Qrahnm of Krultlnnd, first; Mrs. P.
K. Countryman of Ontario, bocoiuI.
Host, threo plntto display George
Mordquwit of Payette, first; Mrs.
Poto Totisen of Nyssa, socond.
FOR SALE at Farmers' prices, 3
bonrs six months old, full brothers
to boar which won sweepstakes at
County Katr. See M. II, Oreon,
Rlvordalo, Oregon, opposite Welaer.
St
LOST Oold mounted Waterman
fountain pon, Initial L. A, W. en
graved on band, self filling. Finder I
jileano leave at this office-, lit
VEGETABLE GROWERS MEETING
DRAWS INTERESTED CROWD
Flclil Day Arranged by Iliucau
Helps Clear Up Possibilities
Kor Commercial Vegetable
Glowing From Both I'm-
(Iuctlon and Market
Standpoint
That vegetablo growing Is receiv
ing attention from many ranchers at
presont was evident from the atten
dance at tho field day held last Mon
day at the Lattig farm on Oregon
Slope. Fifty-four persons assem
bled from tho various sections of
tho country and spent tho afternoon
going over the numerous demonstra
tions of vegetablo crops and varie
ties being grown thoro as part of tho
farm bureau program of work, and
in listening to explanations of meth
ods of production and market de
mands and requirements.
Tho crops which attracted most
attention were head lettuce and fall
cauliflower. Of the eleven acres
of head lettuce, practically all of
which Is a splendid stand, that which
was planted on July 20 was largelj
going to seed. There may be somo
good plants, perhaps enough to part
ly pay production costs, but it is
certain that there will bo no profit
in this early seeding. Tho loss was
attributed to having tho crop too
far advanced before the cool weath
or begins, and the cause of it being
too far advanced was thought to bo
duo first to too early planting and
second to the extra fertile condition
of the soil which promoted a very
rapid growth as compared to land
last year which had grown a prev
ious crop, for Instance. The season
Is also commonly believed to bo hot
ter for the time of year than aver
ago. The later plantings, of which
thoro is by far tho greatest acreage,
appeared to bo coming on satisfac
torily and promise to return very
high yields of fine quality which
should return good profits. So far
as tho fall lettuce crop goes, It
seems well on tho way toward be
coming a part of the farm produc
tion of this section. The possibili
ties with spring lettuce are, however
rather doubtful and will not be de
finitely dotermluded without further
experiment, tho chances however be
ing against any considerable acre
ago ovor being devoted to the crop
owing to difficulty in getting It
headed up before tho hot weather
begins.
Speaking on tho commercial pos
sibilities of other vegotablo crops,
Mr. Whltacro who Is field man for
the California Vegetable Union, stat
od that fall cauliflower for shipment
during October may bo alright if
not grown on too large an ncreago.
Ho pronounced thnt grown on the
Lattig farm as excellent and gave a
demonstration of when to harvest It
and how to preparo tho heads for
shlpmont. Somo of this is now
ready for harvest and as far as tho
production end goes, showed that It
can bo grown without question. Tho
best results wero had by drilling the
seod In tho ground and thinning tho
plants to tho proper distance, this
being earlier and largor than the
transplanted pattchos. It appeared
that tho seed should bo drilled about
the first of July to bring tho har
vest commencing Octobor first.
Although thoro wore many fine
demonstrations showing that big
yields of othor vegetables can be
grown, such as cabbago, tomatoos,
boots, carrots, etc., owing to compe
tition from othor sections, many of
which are nearer tho largo markets
tho discussion brought out the fact
that difficulty would probably be en
countered in marketing If euch were
grown on a largo sculo for shipment
in car lots, and that thorcforo their
production should bo expanded be
yond local roqulromonts until It is
demonstrated that this section can
successfully compete tn the largo
markets. Onions, although exceed
ingly varied In price, might prove
profitable whoro largo yields can be
obtained nnd storage facilities aro
available whon flgurod on tho basis
of average prices or or a term of
years.
A small field of certlfiod seed po
tatoes nttraotod considerable atten
tion, A hill dug at random showed
an estimated yield of nine pounds of
extra good looking seod. Lattig &
Johnston will probably harvest two
carloads from their l!a acre patch.
This will furnish them with all they
nood for next year's planting at a
cost for production and storage of
about 25 pCr cent of tho ordinary
cost of seod potatoes, besides pos
sibly having a fow hundred dollars
worth for sale. This Is one of n
largo number of potato seed plots
being grown this year through the
farm bureau potato Improvement
project to demonstrate how to grow
seed potatoes at homo and thus cut
tho cost of potato seed down to
whoro It wilt bo possible to have
high yielding stuff at n cost which
will enable a grower to make a pro
uuder average market conditions
PRIZES BOTH GO TO BIB BEND
VEGETABLE GROWERS MEETING
(Continued from page one)
Ranoy, Rlverdale; fourth Marie
Tate, Big Bend; fifth Grace Cramer,
Rlverdale.
Sowing, DIv. 1. First Doris Lees
Bonlta; second Mabel Lees, Bonlta;
third Dorothy Laxon, Ontario; 4th
Cora Lowellyn, Bonlta; fifth Mary
Llewellyn, Bonlta. -
Dir. 2. Violet Lees, Bonlta first;
second Elva Pullen, Owyhee; third
Ora Watkins, Jefferson; fourth
Edith Joseph, Jefferson.
Dlv. 3 Catherine Boswell, Vale,
first; second Edith Rettig,Brogan.
Canning First Cora Elliott, of
Kingman Colony; second Evelyn Do
Bord, Kingman Colony; third Mil
dred DoBord, Kingman Colony.
Home making First, Catherine
Boswell, Vale; second Lucille Stone
man. Rlverdale club exhibited an unfin
ished house made of beaver board.
Dairy herd record First Lois
Wilson, lower Big Bend; second
Chester Wilson, lower Big Bend;
third Volney Hickox, Big Bend; 4th
Homer Hatch, Big Bend; fifth Den
ton Humphrey, Vale.
Best dressed doll First Barbara
Castleraan; second Beulah Rasmus
son; third Dorothy Laxon, all of
Ontario.
Special prize, $25, for girl scoring
highest in valous club projects
Doris Lees of Bonlta in sewing.
Boy scoring highest, prize ?25
Eckert Oft, alley View.
The Union Pacific offered $75 to
boy over 16 scoring highest in club
work, money to be used to defray
expenses at summor school Elmer
Parker of Big Bend was the winner.
Livestock Judging Team that
will compete at Taclflc International
at Portland in November consists of
Wilford Weber, Rex Guilford, Alvin
Van Buren of Rlverdale club. Mr.
Green is the local leader.
l.MPOUNDING NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that, In
pursuance of Ordinance No. 236, of
the City of Ontario, I havo taken up
and Impounded the following de
scribed animals found running at
largo within tho corporate limits of
tho City of Ontario, in Malheur
county, Stato of Oregon, to-wit:
Sorrel Mare, branded thus Q
on left shoulder, tail bobbed, white
spot in forhead, ago unknown, wgt.
about 700 pounds.
Bay horse, knot on right knee,
about 12 years old, branded thuB
gj on left stifle.
And that I will on the 7th day of
Oct., 1922, at the hour of Three
o'clock P. M. of said day offer for
salo and will sell above described
animals at public auction to tho
highest bidder, for cash in hand, at
the City Pound in said City of On
tario. Takon up this 25th day of Sept.,
1022. Posted this 27th day of Sept.,
1922. H. C. Farmer,
City Marshal.
STYLISH STOUT
STOUT WOMEN MAY NOW
SELECT SMART, BECOMING
GARMENTS THAT ARE DE
SIGNED ESPECIALLY FOR
THE FULL KIGURE.
STYLISH STOUT SUITS
STYLISH STOUT COATS
Stylish Stout Petticoats
AFTERNOON DRESSES
DRAPED IN THE MODE OK
THE MOMENT
$25 to $35
IN RICH TONES OK NAVY
AND IN BROWN, AND IN
THE EVER WANTED BLACK
STUNNING NEW FUR
TRIMMED COATS
BIUUTIKULLY SILK LINED,
NEWEST STYLES, WIDE
SLEEVES, FUR COLLARS.
$48.50 to $75
GARMENTS
GIRLS CLUD HAS LONG DDBATK
ON SUBJECT OF PROPER MOTTO
After a long debate wherein all
tho rules of polemics were stressed
and many telling arguments the
members of the Girls club last Mon
day night adopted a motto. Tills
serious question found the young
women divided into two camps; one
wanted this sentiment embodied in
the phrase; "Catch tho First One,"
while another group wanted Pla
tonic friendship to provail and
fought for this sentiment: "Be a
Friend to All," none of the girls
sprung that old timer, "I'll be a Sis
ter to You." As above recited the
debate was keen and the Platonists
won out, so this Is the official logan
of the girls: "Be a Friend to All."
Tho young women also devoted time
to seriously outllnnlng a program
of activity wherein they seek, to de
volope a full rounded sphere of ac
tivity; one evening being given to
serious study, one to amusement nnd
another to health giving walks. The
first of the last named events jwlll
be held next Tuesday when the girl3
meet at the home of Mrs. W. L.
Turner at 5:30 p. m. to start on
the first hike. Tho members are
asked to bring a cup and spoon
the kind you eat with.
NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
Department of tho Interior . ...
U. S. Land Office at Vale, Oregon.
September 20, 1922.
Notice is hereby given that
CharleB F. Hager, of Klamath Falls,
Oregon, who, on December 28, 1908,
made desert land entry No. 0240,
for SEVi, Section 13, Township 17
South, Range 46 East, Willamette
Meridian, has filed notice of Inten
tion to make final Proof, under the
third paragraph of tho act of March
4, 1915, to establish claim to the
land above described, before Regis
ter and Receiver, U. S. Land Office,
at Vale, Oregon, on the 23rd day of
November, 1922.
Claimant names as witnesses:
Rosa E. Hager, of Klamath Falls,
Oregon. J. H. McKlnnon, of Pay
eteo, Idaho. Oren Boyer, A. J.
Whiteside, both of Ontario, Oregon.
Thos. Jones, Registor.
PAID LOCAL ADS
MORE EGGS M Brown Leghorn that
won first prize at County Fair.
Eggs for hatching In season. Har
vey Bean, New Plymouth, Idaho. 1
Hemstitching and plaiting, Ander
son & Carlton, 4 blocks west of the
Mooro Hotel. Your patronage ap
preciated. Phone 42W 2
WANTED-Wild- Honey, either with
or without comb. Communicate
with Priscilla Dean, Dreamland
Theatre.
The Royal Neighbors and Modern
Woodmen will meet Sunday evening,
Octobor 2. All members are re
quested to be present.
Dn.,, d,
Company
ONTARIO, ORE.
Glove Silk Underwear
Vests, Camisoles and
Step-Ins
BANDED AND EMBROIDERED,
FLESH AND WHITE, PRICED
$2.75 to $4.50
PRINCES SLIPS. JERSEY
AND SATIN BLOOMERS
BEAUTIFULLY MADE. THESE
GARMENTS ARE GOOD KOR
FALL AND EARLY WINTER
WEAR.
BLACK SPANISH LACE
KLOUNCING AND ALLOVERS
SUITABLE KOR GOWNS AND
KROOK8.. .NEW VESTING8 in
EMBROIDERED SATIN LACE
AND LINENS DONE IN ALL
THE NEWEST COLORS.
ASK TO SEE OUR NEW
LINE Of EMBROIDERIES AND
EMBR0ID1RIED SILK.
FOR RENT Room in modern homo
with or without board. Phone
87R. l
FOR RENT Two light housekeep
ing rooms with bath; also garage.
Mrs. Geo. Gllham, phono 39W. 2t
Cole's Hot Blast Heaters make a
big roduction In your coal bill see
their advertisement and guarantee.
Mrs. M. L. Jones of Blackfoot,
Idaho is hero visiting at tho home
of Mrs. Geo. Fenton.
ENROLLMENT AT UNIVERSITY
SHOWS LARGE INCREASE
University of Oregon, September.
With t heopening of the fall term
of tho University of Oregon a week
away, executlvo officers and faculty
are completing preparations for re
gistration of new and old students.
Credentials of 940 students who
are entering tho University for the
first time have been receiveiWdjjl
approved. At this time a year ago,
870 students had presented their
credentials for approval.
To enter tho University of Oregon
a student must have ub a minimum,
flftteen acceptable High school units
ten of which must be in English,
mathematics, foreign languages,
science and history. Tho remain
ing five are elective. This entrance
requirement is strictly enforced.
Every Freshman is required to be
in Eugene next Saturday in order
that he or she may take the usual
examination in English. Tho result
of the examlnattlon does not affect
a student's admission to the Uni
versity, but will determine whether
the freshman Is to. take certain
work in English this fall. The ex
amination will be held In Vlllard
Hall on the campus.
Registration days aro next Mon
day and Tuesday. All University
work begins Wednesday, October 4.
Thursday, Octtober 5, Is the last day
In the term for filing undergrad
uate cards. Credentials of enter
ing studentB should already be in the
hands of tho registrar. Special ar
rangements have been made, how
ever, to receive credentials this
week, but the student may have to
suffer some penalty In the way of
delay because of filing entrance re
quirements later than two weeks in
advance of registration.
Oregon students with advanced
standing who will enter the Univer
sity for the first time next week
number nine-three, according to Re
gistrar Carlton E. Spencer.
In the 1921-1922 college year,
2,241 students were enrolled during
the year at Eugene. Ono hundred
and fifty-four wero students in the
School of Medicine at Portland;
1,284 took extension courses in
Portland; 1,320 availed themselves
of work In the correspondence study
departments; 110 were specials In
the School of Music, and 860 en
rolled in the Summer schools at
Eugene and Portland. The total
enrollment was 5.9G9 In nil depart
ments of tho University.
SHOES! SHOES!
A WONDERFUL NEW LINE
OK SHOES AND OXKORDS.
MEN'S WOMEN'S BOYS' AND
GntLS'.
BOYS' SUITS
HAVE YOU SEEN OUR NEW
CORDUROY AND SERGE
SUITS AND OUR NEW
GOLF HOSE?
SWEATERS
WOOL VESTS WITH TWO
AND KOUR POCKETS, GOOD,
WARM. HEAVY SWEATERS
IN BROWN AND HEATHER.
JERSEYS KOR THE BOYS,
AND FANCY SWEATERS TOO
KOR BOVS and GIRLS. DON'T
OVERLOOK OUR NEW LINE
OK COATS. THEY ARE
PRIZE WINNERS.
P:
. 4
Sf
M
i