The Clackamas print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1989-2019, February 28, 1996, Page 4, Image 4

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    4
The Clackamas Print
Wednesday, February 28,1996
Rogue Beaver in
Paul Ulmen
Staff Writer
Despite efforts of a trapper
from city animal control, a good
sized hungry beaver was at large
damaging trees at the Environ­
mental Learning Center.
According to Nursery Su­
pervisor and Grounds Keeper
John Swigert, both the beaver
and an otter have been driven
from their home, the head-wa­
ters on New Oak Creek, because
of construction.
“They’re nice animals in
their own environment,” said
Swigert, who referred to the bea­
ver as ‘our destructive little
friend.’
“He’s burrowed into the
bank of the pond and is causing
parts of the footpaths to collapse.
You can see where he’s been; he
leaves a mud trail. He only
comes out at night when nobody
is around,” said Swigert, ex­
plaining why they are so hard
to catch.
Beavers like to chew young
saplings for food, but this one
seems to be especially hungry.
Recycling Manager Batch
Downing related how the bea­
ver destroyed a stand of young
willow freest
“They were like finger
candy to him . Completely wiped
it out. He’s got big teeth—good
size chompers. Got to be a big
one. Has to be at least three to
four feet long, not counting his
tail. He’s cutting three or four
feet up from the base of the tree,”
he said. Other trees, including
a cork-screw willow, were so
badly damaged they had to be
cut down.
It’s not just saplings that he
Feature
ELC Student defeats adversity
is ruining, it’s also larger expen­
sive donated trees, two feet or
more in diameter. “You donate
a tree in the memory of some­
one and he cuts it down,” said
Swigert.
“He is already starting to hit
on larger poplar trees and a
weeping birch. I put wire
around the base of the tree and
he climbed above it and chewed
on it. He ruined a flowering
dogwood, cut it clear down.”
The trapper from animal
control uses a clamshell type
trap, that live-traps the animal
and then they are released into
the wild.
Swigert mentioned a noose
and rope type trap at one time
were used. They were discon­
tinued after a beaver somehow
wrapped himself around a tree
and accidently hung himself and
is now stuffed in the convention
hall at ELC.
Bucky Beaver remained at
large for quite sometime and
dined on the smorgasbord of
yummy saplings.
“Guess he’s more intelli­
gent than we are; we haven’t
been able to catch him,” said
Downing. “If he has been
trappèd before, he’s probably
trap-wise,” stated Swigert.
The trapper put a male bea­
ver scent in the trap to lure what
he thought was a female. “It at­
tracted the ducks instead. We
got some weird ducks here. The
beaver is so smart, he probably
led the ducks into the trap.”
Bucky was finally appre­
hended last Friday ; measured at
4 to 4 1/2 feet long and about
40 to 45 lbs. She will be released
into a more suitable habitat.
Damon Fouts
Staff Writer
Laney Fouse has been both
imbued with the spirit and
wounded by the cruelty of her
birthplace.
Now a Clackamas Commu­
nity College (CCC) student and
Canby resident, the 43 year-old
Native American was born to the
land of her father’s fathers, by a
lake in a valley enveloped by the
towering Redwood forests of
Northern California. Her ances­
tors fished the lake, hunted the
forests and tilled the valley soil
for a century before her birth.
Laney remembers her grand­
father tilling the same soil, grow­
ing apples, almonds, walnuts,
prunes and pears.
“He never took from the land
more than he needed,” she said.
But a lot has changed since
the time of her descendants. The
land has become the Pinoleville
Indian Reservation. The land she
loved on the one hand, was like a
prison on the other.
“People don’t know what it’s
like to grow up on a reservation
where you’re fenced in like an
animal,” she said. “The snicker­
ing in the school hallways, being
called an ‘injun’ by the other kids.
Even as a little kid, you always
knew what you were.”
That’s why at age seven,
Laney turned her brown skin
rash-red, trying to scour the
“injun” off with Chlorox. And
that’s why Laney thought she
didn’t have a mom, because
Laney was an Indian, and it was
bad to be an Indian. Her mom
died when she was three months
old.
Things are better now, maybe
the best they’ve ever been. She is
in her second year at CCC carry­
ing a 3.8 grade point average, and
she’s a member of a half-dozen
contributed photo
Laney Fouse has strived through the problems of
discrimination and homelessness.
campus organizations. She is
president of CCC’s Native Ameri­
can Club; she is the secretary of
Phi Theta Kappa, a campus hon­
ors organization; she is a mem­
ber of the campus Honors Soci­
ety; she is a CCC finalist for the
All USA academic team; and she
is a Staff Writer on the school
newspaper, the Clackamas Print.
Laney’s also a prolific poet,
a singer, a photographer and she
has finished 120 pages of a book
she hopes to publish. She’s a wife
for the third time, married to a
man who, for the first time, rec­
ognizes her gifts. According to
her, her two greatest gifts are her
daughters: 17 year-old Kacey, and
16 year-old Kelly.
Laney credits her talents to
her family. There was always
music, laughter and love in her
home. Her grandfather was a
fiddle player and her father played
the harmonica and the guitar, and
had a great singing voice, she
says.
“When you live on the reser­
vation, you’re related to everyone.
My grandpa threw a Christmas
party one year that lasted all
night. Everyone came. Every­
one was singing. It didn’t matter
if you could sing or not... I can
still see my grandpa playing the
fiddle, and my dad playing the
guitar. I was 13. It was wonder­
ful,” she recalled.
Laney was eager to taste life
beyond the reservation at an early
age. When she was 15, she moved
to Ukiah, California, a mile from
the reservation. She immediately
got a job at a local radio station,
and within a year at age 16, she
was one of the first women disc
See Laney on page 5
tv MvH Jilts awl Jin Marts
A to Z
Move your way though the letter maze from A in the top left to Z in the
bottom right according to these rules:
Drive This Vehicle To College.
This is an Ml Tank, 50 tons of armor, guns and
advanced electronics. You just might need this vehicle to
get to college. That’s where we come in.
The Oregon Army National Guard is looking
for motivated individuals to accept the challenge of their
life. Earn up to $6,000 in college assistance with the
Montgomery GI Bill, plus a salary for part-time
employment
All it takes is about two days a month and two weeks
a year and the desire for adventure. Call your local
recruiter today.
the Clackamas Recruiting Office 557-5320
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