The Clackamas print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1989-2019, November 10, 1993, Page 2, Image 2

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    News
Pg. 2 The Clackamas Print
News Briefs
Compiled by Vicki Welch
The Art Department is starting a goodwill project for the campus
which will provide a “framing service” for art in offices or public
spaces. The department can offer suggestions of where to purchase
prints. Artwork for public spaces must go through the Campus Art
Committee. For more information, call the Art Department at ext.
2386.
The first College Conversation will be Nov. 16 at noon in CC-
127. Students and staff are invited to attend an informal brown-bag
lunch. They will be held once or twice a month. Dessert and drinks
will be provided. College President John Keyser will be talking about
“the State of the College.” Those in attendance may ask questions.
For more information, call Becky Carnahan at ext. 2205.
Clackamas is hosting an evening of instrumental jazz Nov.
17 from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in the Gregory Forum. The concert features
the Willamette University Jazz Ensemble, the Clackamas Commu­
nity Jazz Ensemble and Portland saxophone artist Jeff Homan. Tom
Wakeling will direct both ensembles. Admission is $3 for adults and
$2 for students, senior citizens are free. For more information, call
Jean Marshall at ext. 2434.
The Fellowship of Christian Athleteswill be meeting Nov. 16
in Room R-012 from 12:30 to 1:30p.m. Refreshments will be served.
For more information, call Kathie Woods at ext. 2418.
The College is hosting an art opening today to show the
paintings of Jack Fellman from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Pauling Gallery. The
opening is open to the public and will be on display through Dec. 3.
For more information, call ext. 2386.
The American Student Association of Community Colleges
Regional Conference is scheduled for Friday and Saturday at
Clackamas. Registration is on Friday at 11 a.irt. Some of the topics
are “Student Voice: Political Potential,” “Leadership Skills: Better
Student Government” and “Federal Overview: Funding Priorities
for Education.”
r
The College is offering a Men, Women & Relationships
Seminar Nov. 19 and 20 in Barlow Hall, Room 114. Counselor
David Campbell will present ways to identify factors within that
foster healthy or unhealthy relationships and examine common roads
leading to better communication between the sexes. The cost is $15
The Clackamas Print
Editors-in-Chief:
Jeff Kemp, Heidi
Branstator (Ext. 2576)
Feature Editor:
Tina McFarland (Ext. 2577)
Sports Editor:
Justin Fields (Ext. 2577)
Frank Jordan, Cori Kargel, Zach
Kreinheder, Scott Morris, Chad
Patteson, Michelle Shipman, Andrea
Smith, Staci Smith, Nicole Turley,
Maury Webber, Vicki Welch
Secretary:
Cheryl Willemse
Advisor:
Copy Editor:
Linda Vogt (Ext. 2310)
The Clackamas Print aims to report
Paul Valencia (Ext. 2578)
the news in an honest, unbiased,
professional manner. The opinions
Photo Editor:
Anjanette Booth (Ext. 2578) expressed in The Clackamas Print do
<
not necessarily reflect those of the
Co-Buisness Managers: student body, college administration, its
Michele Myers, Tyson Morrow (Ext. faculty or The Print’s advertisers. The
2578)
Clackamas Print is a weekly
publication distributed eveiy Wednesday
Columnist:
except for finals week. The open
Eric “St.Anthony’s” Eatherton
advertising rate is $4.50 per column
inch. Clackamas Community College,
19600 S. Molalla Avenue, Oregon City,
Staff Writers: Cathryn Bellcau,
Michael Bradley, Nathan Clark, Jason Oregon; 97045, Barlow 104. All letters
to the editor should be submitted by 2
Eck, Steve Fulton, Kathryn Gibbons,
pm the Friday prior to the next issue
Jason Gibson, Jennifer Gunst,
Christopher Haberman, Jason Hunter, date.
Seco
!
:
Wednesday. November 10.1993
Book exchange offers more money
than bookstore's buy-back policy
by Maury Webber
Staff Writer
The Associated Student Gov­
ernment will be sponsoring a book
exchange for all students who are
interested in selling their textbooks
for more money than the
bookstore’s buy-back policy can
offer.
By signing areleaseform
and paying a small service fee,
which hasn’t been determined yet,
student's can list and possibly dis­
play a book they wish to sell. The
ASG will then take the responsi­
bility to contact the students and
give them their money when the
book is sold.
“The fee won ’ t be much,
it’s really only to cover our costs,”
said Shannon Chinn, ASG Sena­
tor. In return, she said, students
can get a better deal than selling
their books back to the bookstore.
ASG Vice-President Joel
Thomas agrees. “Depending on
the shape of the book, students can
ask for up to. 80 percent of the
retail,” he said.
“We also hope to get a
room where we can display the
books for sale so that other stu­
dents can inspect them,” Chinn
said:
Although there are a few
details that need to be worked out,
they both expec t the book exchange
to be in place by the end of the
quarter.
“We’ll start collecting
books about two weeks before the
end of the term,” Thomas said.
Both Chinn and Thomas
would like to see this service con­
tinue every quarter as a way to
make getting an education at
Clackamas even more cost effec­
tive.
Any students interested
in getting more information should
contact Thomas or Chinn at the
ASG office or call ext 2247.
“We’re sure it’s going to
be a great success because stu­
dents benefit both ways,” Chinn
said.
PSU spring transfer deadline approaches
by Jennifer Gunst
Staff Writer
For students who plan to
transfer to Portland State Univer­
sity sometime in the near future,
there are first a few procedures to
follow and requirements to meet
PSU requires students to
have already obtained a minimum
of 30 credits and will not accept
transfer credits that exceed 108.
Students must at least have a cu­
mulative 2.25 GPA. Official tran-
scripts along with the PSU appli­
cation are to be sent with a $50
application fee post-dated by the
deadline indicated Tor the term.
Transfer degrees are not required
for admission. Block transfers con­
vey that general requirements have
been met and will automatically
elevate students to junior status.
The deadline for Winter
Term was Oct 1 and all Spring
Term information must be received
by Feb. 1. However, students who
miss the deadline are allowed to
take up to seven credits and do not
need to be admitted.
Applications can be
picked up at the Portland State
admissions office and Clackamas
transcripts must be officially sent
through the school by mail or fax
for a fee of $4. This procedure
usually takes 24 hours and can be
taken care of at the admissions
office in the community center.
Co-op babysitting exchange to begin
■ ASG hopes that
program will be up
and running by
Winter Term
by Andrea Smith
Staff Writer
Going to school can be
difficult for anyone. Making time
to attend classes, study, keep a job
and still have a social life can seem
impossible. It’s even more diffi­
cult when adding the responsibil­
ity of caring for a baby, toddler
and/or pre-schooler.
Although the majority of
students at Clackamas don’t have
children, a growing number of one-
and two-parent families are at­
tempting to juggle school, family
and work in order to better their
lives through education. These stu­
dents must find suitable and af­
fordable day care, which is rarely
easy.
There is a new program
that may solve some of the prob­
lems for the students who need
help. According to Associated Stu­
dent Government Secretary/Trea-
surer Cindy Barnes, ASG is orga­
nizing a cooperative babysitting
exchange. A data base is being
formed listing student-parents who
would like to exchange hour-for-
hour babysitting with other par­
ents. For example, if one student
attends school five days a week,
while another attends night classes,
ASG could match these student­
parents so they could coordinate
their schedules with each other.
“By Winter Term, we
hope to have this program up and
running for use by students,”
Barnes said.
ASG plans to include the
Harmony Center and Wilsonville
campuses in this exchange. Once
the data base has enough names,
the matching process can begin.
The only way this service will work
is if parents in need take advantage
of it
An informational pam­
phlet containing phone numbers
and procedures for emergency situ­
ations is being provided, free of
charge, from ASG.
For more
information, contact Barnes in the
ASG office, Room 140, in the Com­
munity Center. A weekly support
meeting to allow parents using the
service to get acquainted will be
held at 3:30 p.m. on Thursdays in
the Fireside Lounge, also located
in the Community Center.
Put your music on CD!
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