The Clackamas print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1989-2019, November 18, 1992, Image 1

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    Wednesday, November 16, 1992
The Clackamas Print
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Vol. XXVI No. 5
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Oregon City, Oregon
Clackamas Community College
Entertainment Coordinator position opens
INSIDE
Clackamas parking situation
creates controversy
Dean of College Services Gary
Dirrim comes up with solutions
to CCC'spaiking problem. One
suggestion from Dirrim is to
utilize the Barlow-Randall lot.
See page 3
ASG leaders experience major
changes in their lives
ASG Vice-President Shauna
Barnett expands on her life as a
"single mom." ASG President
Amy Gaskell shares what her
presidency has been like during
her pregnancy.
See page 6
Rhapsody literary feature
displays CCC student poetry
A collection of poetic works,
done entirely by students of
Clackamas, is included in The
Clackamas Print Enter "A
Box-Shaped Room," experience
"An Unaccepted Joy," and
behold
"Gideon
Candle
Abraham."
See pages 8 and 9
¡Jennifer 8 takes audience to
¡edge... of their seat
The psychological suspense
thriller, Jennifer 8, starring
¡Andy Garcia and Uma Thurman,
! recently opened in thePortland-
Metroarea. Feature Editor Heidi
Branstator gives an in-depth
¡review of the intense flick.
See page 4
Clackamas Cross Country
takes championship
The Cougar team won the
NWAACC championship with
! 61 points combined on Nov. 7.
Placing first for each team was
¡Mike Hickey and Lynda
Cornwall.
See page 12
News......_________
23
Letters to Editor.....___ ........3
Entertainment.........................4,5
Features------------------- .6,7,8,9,10
Sports.----------------------------- 11,12
Classified Ads...................... ....12
9-4 vote removes Isaakson from ASG
by Frank Jordan
Staff Writer
ASGEntertainmentCoordina-
tor Harold Isaakson was removed
from his position by a 9-4 vote in
the ASG meeting held on Monday.
“Right now, I’m pretty miser­
able,” commented Isaakson. “I really
did not know that they (ASG) were
going to do this. I thought that I
was doing my job.”
ASG President Amy Gaskell
had met with her other officers over
the course of the past month trying
to resolve this issue, but with not
much success.
“We had continually tried to
correct the problem areas, but we
got to a point where we were con­
cerned about the overall health of
ASG,” Gaskell said after the vote.
“I had hoped that he would resign
his position, and I had given him
the opportunity to do so. But he
didn’t, and we had to take this course
of action.”
Prior to the vote, ASG gaye
Isaakson the opportunity topres­
ent his side of the story.
“I won’t claim to be per­
fect,” Isaakson began, and “I’ve
made my share of mistakes,
but I am only human, like the
rest of us. The entertainment
has happened, and although not
altogether smooth, it has come
off.
My leadership style is dif­
ferent than Amy’s (Gaskell).
But this doesn’t necessarily
mean that I’m not doing my
job.”
’ »
On the point about Gas­
kell asking him to resign,
Isaakson told the group, “I just
am not convinced that there is
real justification for me to re­
sign.”
Gaskell clearly was dis­
tressed before bringing up the
subject in the meeting to the
rest of ASG, but she commented
“This was difficult for me, but
I feel that this is the best thing
to do for the rest of the group.”
After the discussion in the
meeting, a vote by secret ballot
was conducted and by a vote of 9-
4, Isaakson was ousted.
After the meeting, Gaskell
was relieved that the issue had
Isaakson looked a 'little
peaked afterwards but was gen­
erally upbeat. “Since I came in
with noexperience, I thought that
I did a decent job. I thought that
we had all of the problems
smoothed out I guess that we
didn’t”
Isaakson, however, was en­
couraged by the feedback that he
had received from students on
entertainment. “From all of the
feedback from students, they
thought we had better entertain­
ment this quarter that in the past.
It’s something to be encouraged
about.”
Harold Isaakson
Vivian Johnson
been dealt with. “Harold was
very qualified, just not in enter­
tainment. I just believe that Harold
was a little over-committed and
that it hurt him and the rest of us
as a whole.”
Gaskell announced that ap­
plications for the position of
Entertainment Coordinator would
be accepted immediately and it
would be hoped that the position
would be filled in about two weeks.
Applications can be picked up at
ASG, located in the Student
Activities Office.
Committee's plan will be effective Dec. 1
Clackamas sets official harassment report procedure
by Paul Valencia
Staff Writer
A harassment report procedure
for students claiming offenses
against them from staff members
has been passed by the President’s
Council and the Faculty Senate and
will go into effect Dec. 1.
The plan allows a student to
bring up the alleged incident with­
out signing a written complaint form.
The instructor will be told of the
complaint against him or her;
however, disciplinarian action will
not be pursued, according to Kim
Faddis, chair of the Gender and
Ethnic Equity Committee.
If a student wishes to pursue
the issue with a written complaint,
then he or she must go through the
student complaint process al­
ready in use. From there, an
investigation into the alleged
incident begins.
“Often times, when a stu­
dent came forward with a
complaint, they would feel
intimidated about signing a
formal written complaint, but
they wanted some avenue to
have the problem resolved,”
Faddis explained.
That’s why the committee
came up with the idea that if
the student didn’t want to pur­
sue through the student com­
plaint process, the problem
could still be handled infor­
mally, as the instructor is told
about the complaint If re­
quested, the student’s name will
not be mentioned to the instruc­
tor, Faddis stressed.
“Many just want the prob­
lem to stop,” Faddis explained.
“Hopefully, this process, being
informal, will help this to hap­
pen.”
That’s what the handout
which describes the new proce­
dure says. “The intent of the in­
formal complaint notification is
not to determine guilt or inno­
cence, but to inform,” it reads.
Also with the new process,
students can ask that the instruc­
tor not be told of the complaint
until after grades are filed if they
are concerned about retaliation
or fear being singled out, Faddis
said.
Some have questioned the
procedure’s intent, Faddis said.
But it is clearly explained in the
handout. “This procedure is in­
tended to promote the right of
staff and students to work and
learn in an environment where
the dignity of each individual is
respected,” it reads.
“This procedure wasn’t ap­
proved in time for the Student
Handbook, but will be included
in the next printing,” Faddis said.
Until then, students can get infor­
mation on the process from any
staff member. Students will be
referred to one of four student
equity advocates who will assist
them with the report procedure
process.
The Faculty Senate approved
the process Oct 29, while the
President’s Council did the same
Nov. 3. It has been almost two
years since the Gender and Eth­
nic Equity Committee was formed.
Faddis said it took a while for the
procedure to be developed due to
its sensitive nature.
“I never expected it to take
so long,” she said, explaining that
several groups on campus gave
input on the procedure and it went
through several revisions.
Now, it’s finally done. “It’s
a big accomplishment I appreci­
ate the committee’s work and
patience in getting this put to­
gether,” Faddis said.
With the procedure in place,
“hopefully students will feel like
using this avenue first before going
... to an attorney,” Faddis said.
“Then we resolve the issue inter­
nally.”