The Clackamas print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1989-2019, April 25, 1990, Page 6, Image 6

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    FEATURE
April 25,1990
THE CLACKAMAS PRINT
Page 6
Members cast in London farce
Jim Spickelmier
Staff Writer
Rookery Nook, a farce by
British playwright Ben Travers
is the spring term play to be per­
formed in the Mcloughlin The­
atre.
First performed June 30,
1926 at the Aldwich theatre in
London, Rookery Nook, accord­
ing to Director Jack Shields, was
one of over 180 plays written by
Travers during the 1920s and
30s.
The original location of the
play, Chumpton by the sea near
Sumerset, has been changed by
Shields to Compton by the sea
near Carmelle, California and is
set during the post WWI era just
before the roaring 20s.
The cast consists of: Kenye
North as Gertrude Twine, Mich­
elle Hagen as Mrs. Leverett, Lorin
Arendt as Harold Twine, Dan Kerr
as Clive Popkiss, Travis Box as
Gerald Popkiss, Christina Bryant
as Rhoda Marley, David Burnett
as Putz and Admiral Juddy, Ch­
oy! Ellison as Poppy Dickey, Tonya
Cartmill as Clara Popkiss, and Greg
Hoffart as Mrs. Possett
The crew members are: As­
sistant Director/Stage Manager
William Anderson, Sound Design/
Engineer Jeff Cibula, Lighting
Design/Engineer Ron Theod,
Wardrobe Cheryl Ellison, Prop-
erties: David Burnett (Chair),
Kenye North, Jeff Cibula, and
Lorin Arendt
Rookery Nook opens Thurs­
day May 17 at 8 p.m. and runs
May 17,18,19 at 8 p.m.; June 1
and 2 at 8 p.m. and Sunday June
3 at 2:30 p.m.
There will also be four one
act plays showing this term: Jessy,
an award winning play from West­
ern Oregon State; The Princess
of Alden by CCC student George
Hurlburt; Seascape with Sharks
and Dancer directed by Adam
Jarvey; and Minisota Moon di­
rected by Jim Nicodemus. The
one act plays will be performed
Wednesday, May 30 at noon and
Thursday, May 31 at 7:30 p.m.
Mural tells college folk tales
‘Circling North," an exhibit of drawings and sculptures by
Linda Halfon is on display in the Pauling Gallery.
Photo by Jlim Spickelmier
Sculptures, drawings
influenced by neighbors
by Jim Spickelmier
Staff Writer
Artist sculptor Linda Hal­
fon’s exhibit “Circling North” is
currently on display, for ones
viewing pleasure, in the Pauling
Gallery.
California born Halfon re­
ceived her MSA from the Uni­
versity of Oregon. She currently
resides in Sitka Alaska, a com­
munity of 8,000 with only 14 miles
of streets, where she is a sculpt­
ing and drawing instructor for
the University of Alaska, Sitka.
Halfon has studied original
Michelangelo drawings in Lon­
don and through the Jan Zach
Sculptor Award, from Univer­
sity of Oregon, has had the
opportunity to study original
sculpting in Florence, Italy.
At home, in Sitka, Halfon’s
neighbors are the eagle, raven,
and great blue heron. They have
influenced her work and become
the models for her colored pen­
cil drawings and terra cotta, stea­
tite, and bronze sculpting cur­
rently on display.
Through the University of
Alaska, Halfon travels, via sea
plane and boat, to small Alas­
kan communities to bring art
instruction to the remote areas.
There are five art shows each
year in the Pauling Gallery. The
faculty art show starts the year;
then, three professional artists
are invited by the art instructors
to put on art shows, and the
student art show ends the year.
by Sue Ann Walker
Staff Writer
Through the doorway of that
room that we rush to between
classes, hang out to study in and
sit in to pour over current events
is a story of some common folk.
The room is our own library
and the stories are not sitting on a
shelf waiting to be read. They can
be found in a piece of folk art, a
mural, that hangs to tell tales of
some of our favorite teachers and
those who have played a part in
the history of Clackamas Com­
munity College.
The mural that graces the wall,
so that it can be seen upon enter­
ing the library, is a day relief sculp­
ture created by the hands of ce­
ramics instructor Nancy Travers
and the tales of Assistant Dean
John Hooley. It might be easy to
ignore this creation in the rush to
obtain information for assignments
between classes but it is worth
taking a moment to explore.
“Folk art” may sound as
though it describes something of
another time...another culture
alien to our own. Fortunately, that
definition can be disspelled as a
viewer identifies instructors Le­
land John, Craig Lesley and even
the face of John Hooley himself
among the richly textured wall
hanging. To define folk art prop­
erly would be to say that it tells a
story of common folk. Most likely
ON-CAMPUS CHILD CARE
Do it
out of respect
for the dead.
And the living.
Center Site on campus .
* Full and part-time care
THE AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIAL PROGRAM.
That’s not too much for your country to ask
A name and a few more facts. That’s
all we’re really asking qf the two million young
men who will turn 18 this year. After all,
there’s no draft. So if someone you know should
. be registering, remind them that it only takes
five minutes at the post o:
keep our country strong.
Camp Fire Community Child Care provides
a developmentally appropriate program for
children 6 months to 6 years old.
* Convenient Orchard
If you are curious to learn
more about the stories behind this
folk art creation stay tuned to the
Clackamas Print. A feature will
be done on selected portions of
the mural in the next issues.
a lively, interesting story that used
to be kept alive by the passing
down of generations, yet we have
the privilege to see the stories in
their infancy on the wall of our
very own library.
* Serving both the
college & the community
* A United Way agency
* Monday-Friday
7:00 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Esalassi
* Kids love it here!
American Heart
Association
Oregon Affiliate, Inc.
C amp F ire
M t . H ood C ouncil
1-800-452-9445
This space provided as a public service.
inches
Register with Selective Service
It’s qaick. It’s easy. And it’s the law
657-6683
Presented as a Public Service Announcement by the Selective Service System.
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15.07
65.43
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22.85
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55.56
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70.82
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63.51
34.26
59.60
8
39.92
11.81
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52.24
48.55
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-0.40
1.13
11(A)
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87.34
-0.75
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82.14
-1.06
0.43
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