The Clackamas print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1989-2019, May 24, 1989, Page 4, Image 4

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    News/
THE CLACKAMAS PRINT
Page 4
May 24,1989
Keyser receives national honor Engineer Benton
remembered by
friends, associates
by Christopher L. Curran *
Editor-In-Chief
Clackamas Community col­
lege President John S. Keyser
received another honor in his
career recently when he was named
vice chair in the American Asso­
ciation of Community and Junior
Colleges (AACJC).
A vice chair in the AACJCis
a chair-elect, spending a year train­
ing to chair one of five commit­
tees in that association. A vice
chair is also an ex-officio (non­
voting) member of some commit­
tees.
“It’s a great opportunity for
me to grow,” said Keyser. “The
national agenda, in contrast with
the local agenda is much more
complicated. It’s a new dimension
for me.”
The AACJC is an organiza­
tion which aims to represent the
interests of community and jun­
ior colleges throughout the na­
tion.
“It is the most aggressive and
largest post-secondary organiza­
tion in the country,” said Keyser.
The organization has grown
from 22 members in 1920 to 1,087
members this year.
Among other things, the
AACJC works with funding or-
by Jillian Potter
JOHN KEYSER - Named vice-chair of the American Association
of Community Colleges and Junior Colleges.
ganizations to ensure that colleges
receive “a substantial portion of
financial support from the agen­
cies,” according to their 1989
report
According to the report, dur­
ing this school year, grant money
was directed to more than 130
colleges, which are members of
the organization.
The AACJC also collects data
ON-CAMPUS DAY CARE
Camp Fire Community Day Care provides a
developmentally apprppriate program for
children 6 weeks to 6 years old.
* Convenient Orchard
Center site
* Monday-Friday,
7 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
from community, junior and tech­
nical colleges, such as enrollment
(both part-time and full-time.
Using these figures, they advise
the United States Department of
Education, and other national
research agencies who are charged
with analyzing higher education.
The AACJC is working to
make the transfer from a two-year
college to a foiir-year college eas­
ier on students.
They are attempting to re­
duce barriers which impede stu­
dent transfers to afour-year school.
They are combining all the
resources of the community, jun­
ior and technical colleges to im­
prove the student development.
* Non-profit, United Way
agency
Express
* Financial assistance
available
The Clackamas Print is
* Full-time and part-
time care
Yourself!
ooking for a few good
stories... for our Final
Edition, May 31. Have
something to say? Type
it and turn it in by this
Friday, 5 p.m., at Trailer
3. It's your chance to
get published!
* Servicing the non­
college and college
community
Camp Fire
Mt. Hood Council
C57-CCS3
by Mark A. Borrelli
Sports Editor
Clackamas lost a long-time
employee and a good friend Sun­
day ,May 14 when engineer Dale
F. Benton died from complica­
tions of cancer.
Bentonserved in theNavy for
21 years as a chief petty officer
before retiring in 1971 and com-
. ing to Clackamas in 1973. His
Clackamas career started as a
custodian, but made the jump to
stationary engineer in 1975 and
stayed there until his death.
“He was a loyal employee. He
was loyal to the college; loyalty
was worth a lot,” said Paul Roe­
der.
Roeder was Benton’s super­
visor,but was also his close friend.
The two spent a lot of time to­
gether outside of work, including
holidays.
“IVe had (Benton) at my house
for Christmas, Thanksgiving-all of
the holidays. He was like part of
the family, my kids all liked him.
He appeared to be a tight person,
but he had a good heart He helped
a lot of people on campus,” said
Roeder.
Benton was divorced and the
father of two. He spent most of
his time at Clackamas, whether
working or socializing. He was
eligible to retire last year, but wasn’t
scheduled to retire until this July.
“He was losing money work­
ing, but he loved this school. This
was his social life. Dale was a strong
supporter of women’s basketball.
It was like he adopted the women’s
team,” said Roeder.
“Dale has always helped out
withathletics all the time that I’ve
been here, since 1980. He was
always supportive of athletics and
willing to help in anyway he could,"
said Phil Garver, long- time friend
and head women’s basketball
coach.
The women’s team is plan­
ning on honoring Benton by dedi­
cating their season to him next-
year.
“We’re going to dedicate our
season to him. We’re going'to |
wear black arm bands in respect
for him and were going to have a I
page for him in our program next
year,” said Garver.
For those who didn’t know
Benton, he was a humorous man
who could often be found hanging
around Randall Hall, his second
home, smoking a cigarette and
telling jokes.
“He loved to: tell jokes. He
will be missed;, he was definitely a
character of this school,” said
Director of Personnel Jini Painter.
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inches
I
1
39.12
13.24
15.07
2
65.43
18.11
18.72
3
49.87
-4.34
-22.29
4
44.26
-13.80
22.85
5
55.56
9.82
-24.49
D50 Illuminant, 2 degree observer
6
70.82
-33.43
-0.35
7
63.51
34.26
59.60
8
39.92
11.81
-46.07
Density
9
52.24
48.55
18.51
10
97.06
-0.40
1.13
11(A)
92.02
-0.60
0.23
12
87.34
-0.75
0.21
13
82.14
-1.06
0.43
14
72.06
-1.19
0.28
15
62.15
-1.07
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0.04
0.09
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0.22
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0.51
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