The print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1977-1989, May 20, 1987, Page 5, Image 5

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    Feature
_______ ___
Library staff members dedicated to education
by Mary Prath
Staff Writer
Clackamas Community Col­
lege has an excellent library
staff. The team consists of eight
members, all of which are vital
to the functioning of the
library.
Valerie McQuaid, head of the
department was featured in an
article April 29, so she will not
be included in this article.
Don Vorderstrasse, reference
periodical librarian, began his
college days intending to be a
pharmacist. “College tends to
send you where you need to
go,” explained Vorderstrasse,
on his career change. “If you do
well in a class, you go that
way,” continued Vorderstrasse.
“College tends to send
you where you need to
eo.”
■Being a reference periodical
librarian “is a learning ex­
perience everyday,” said
Vorderstrasse about his job.
“I know a lot about a variety
Df subjects because of the
classes I took,” said
Vorderstrasse when asked how
he felt about the three years he
studied pharmaceuticals. When
a student comes up and asks
him a question about zoology or
sociology he is familiar with
those subjects and more.
Vorderstrasse gives tours of the
|i•y to students. “I tailor tours
the
classes,”
said
erstrasse. He also is teaching
ss this term to help students
rstand how to use the library
effectively. “It is a unique
se; it is a team teaching
, two people teach how to
with college, and I teach
iry skills,” explained
erstrasse.
I
I
I
i
is
obvious
that
erstrasse, who has been at
CCC for 16 years enjoys his job.
r When people start asking me
questions I get involved and
before ya know it it’s a quarter to
three, and it’s almost time to go
home,” said Vorderstrasse.
I Vorderstrasse is married with
two children. His son graduated
from Lewis and Clark, and his
daughter from Willamette*
University.
Phyllis Potts, the assistant to
the librarian began her library
career because she wanted to help
people who wanted it. “I giiess
I’m a frustrated teacher. Theres
little confrontation in the library.
I was a teacher for junior high
and there are so many kids who
don’t want to be there. I’d rather
help someone who wants help,”
stated Potts. Potts’ job duties are
to assist Valerie, the Librarian;
work at the desk, checking books
in or out; public relations, if CCC
has an art show, like this week,
write something up for the “To­
day” bulletin; and to decorate the
bulletin boards and cubes.
Potts went to college for five
years for a teaching certificate.
She worked as a high school
teacher in California, then as a
junior high teacher in Oregon;
she then worked for a year giving
tours at the McLoughlin House.
Potts found out about the job as
assistant to the library through an
ad in the paper. She has worked
at CCC for a year and a half.
“I like working in the library,
working with people. I get a kick
out of helping people find what
they need,” said Potts.
“I
get a kick out of help­
ing people find what they
need99
Potts is married with three
children. Her oldest will be
graduating from Pacific
Lutheran this year, the middle
child is in his first year of college
and the youngest will be starting
college in the fall.
Joanne Scott, cataloging
assistant, needed to go back to
work, so she took a class on
library aide here at CCC. The
class was an 80 hour class that
was very intense. Scott then
moved to Grants Pass where she
worked for the county school
system, came back here to work
for West Linn school district,
and then a friend told her of the
job here at the college. “I’ve
worked here 13 years,” said
Scott.
Scott’s job duties are to work
on the search computer for
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Library staff left to right- Jim Edgington, Claudia O’Driscoll, Phyllis Potts, Don
Vorderstrasse, JoAnne Scott, Mary Pat Moty, and not pictured Elizabeth Elligboe.
bibliographic description cards a good daddy,” said Potts,
for the card catalog. Scott edits when describing him in his
the data to produce the cards absence. “A day like today is
that go in the card catalog. “It’s difficult, because he isn’t here,”
a lot of detail work.
added Potts.
“The computer can borrow
Claudia O’Driscoll, in charge
from at least seven other coun­ of the inter-library loans com­
tries,” said Scott with excite­ puter in the library, got into this
ment in her eyes. The ICC is the career because “I like the
computer that is used to order academic atmosphere,” ex­
books from other libraries.
plained O’Driscoll.
Her job duties are to inter­
“I’ve been going to school
since I started here, 13 years change books and magazines
ago. I’m going to get a BA in from other libraries. When a stu­
history of arts and crafts,” ex­ dent wants a book, but the
plained Scott, when asked library doesn’t have it she gets it
from another library for them.
about goals.
Scott is married with two “It’s easy, all they have to do is
grown girls. Her husband works fill out a form,” continued
at Tech., her oldest daughter O’Driscoll. She is also responsi­
works at Good Samaritan ble for keeping track of the
Hospital, and has a degree in magazine subscriptions. The
art; and the other girl is a pro­ library ihas “290 (subscriptions);
fessional musician who teaches it was 500, but budget cuts have
music. She also tutors reading brought it down,” said
O’Driscoll.
here on campus.
Jim Edgington, circulation
O’Driscoll has a BA in English
supervisor, has a degree in literature and is taking classes in
music. He has been at CCC for pottery. She has some of her
eight years. Edgington is in work in galleries around
charge of circulation, checking
books in and out, taking care of
been going to school
reference books, cleaning
since
I started here, 13
records off after students bring
them back, shelving books cor­ years ago.99
rectly, keeping the copy
machine going, and watering Portland. The Real Mother
the plants. Edgington is also .Goose, Greystone, and O’Con­
responsible for training students nell are where you can see them.
for work-study positions in the
O’Driscoll has worked at CCC
library.
for five years, “I enjoy working
Edgington is married, with here, it’s a pretty campus,”
two children, a boy six months stated O’Driscoll.
and a girl five years old. “He is
O’Driscoll is married with two
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grown children, and two grand­
children who live in Oregon. Her
husband works at The Health
Sciences University in Portland.
Mary Pat Moty, acquisitions
coordinator, began her career in
library science because “I’ve
always liked books, and working
with people,” explained Moty.
Moty has a BA of Art and a
masters in Library Science.
Moty’s job duties are to buy all
the books, and supplies for the
library, and bookkeeping. “If it
has anything to do withmoney, I
do it,” explained Moty. She also
taught the Effective Learning
class.
Moty had a picture of the
President and his wife on neiNof-
fice wall. When asked if she was a
fan she replied, “oh yeah,” she
went on to add, “there are eight
staff members here (in the
library), one republican and
seven others,” she said with a
laugh.
Moty, who has three children,
has worked in the library for
three years; she will be moving up
to Cataloger in July.
Elizabeth
Elligboe,
bibliographic searcher and even­
ing circulation coordinator,
began her career in library science
because “I like the book world, it
keeps me up on what’s going
on.”
Elligboe has many job duties,
working in the library from 4:30
to 9, which includes checking out
books and answering questions.
She also gathers information
necessary to order a requested
book. “I use several tools, in-
■cluding books in print, catalogs
and I find other sneaky ways,”
said Elligboe with a grin.
Elligboe lives in Portland, but
was born in Africa; her parents
were missionaries. Elligboe
came to the United States when
she was eight years old. “I have
lived in 30 different places,”
said Elligboe. She has been in
Oregon for 15 years. She likes
to travel, enjoys music and dan­
cing. Elligboe has been at CCC
for three years.
Clackamas Community Col­
lege is fortunate to have such
educated, helpful, and
dedicated staff members work­
ing in the library.
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