The print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1977-1989, May 26, 1982, Page 4, Image 4

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    Crowds throng to College Hoe Down, Timber Fest
QUEEN OF THE hill. Three youngsters battle it out to be the “King of the hill,** but neither of the boys won, instead the girl did.
Staff Photos by Duane Hiersche
By Darla J. Weinberger
Of the Print
Timber
Fest
and
Hoedown, 1982 was held on
May 22, at the Clackamas
county Fairgrounds in Canby.
There were 17 logging events
and the band, Wheatfield
played at the hoedown.
“The Timber Fest was a
real success,” said Student Pro­
gram Specialist, Dave Buckley.
“Last year we held it at the Col­
lege and there wasn’t as large
of a turnout.”
Dignitaries gather for by-pass ceremonies
The College last Thursday
was the site for the Highway
212 Funding Ceremony which
marks the beginning of actual
construction of the by-pass
scheduled for this summer.
Ralph
Groener,
Clackamas County Board of
Commissioners chair and Col­
lege Board of Education
member, served as master of
ceremonies.
Fred Miller, director of the
Oregon Department of
Transportation announced bids
will be open for construction of
the by-pass on June 24, and
construction should begin
about one month later.
Joan Cartales, mayor of
Oregon City joked about how
long the by-pass has been in
the planning stages. “Wasn’t
the by-pass originally planned
for horse and buggies
Car­
tales said.
Senator Mark Hatfield and
Gov. Victor Atiyeh were both
scheduled to speak, but neither
of them were able to attend the
ceremony. Jerry Frank, ad­
ministrative assistant to Hatfield
was on hand to accept the key
to the City of Oregon City. It is
the first time that Oregon City,
the oldest city in the Pacific
Northwest, has ever offered
anyone a key to the city.
Frank was also presented
with a gold-spaded shovel to
Others on hand for the
ceremony included State
Representative Ed Lindquist,
and college President Dr. John
Hakanson.
A workshop entitled: “Stepparents Survival Kit” will be of­
fered at the College June 3, from 7-10 p.m. Participants will ex­
amine differences between traditional parenting and stepparen­
ting through lecture and small group exercises. Taught by step­
parent and counselor Tom Hibbert, the workshop will be held in
CC 101. There is a $3 fee.
Logging events included
the “Horizontal chop.” Ray
Shummay won the event with
a time of 1:12 minutes. The
“Ax throw” was won by Doug
Shannon. Dave Veelle threw a
keg 26’3” to win the “Beer Keg
Throw.”
Also Keith Hayes won the
Stock Saw in 45 seconds. Win­
ing the Double Buck was Keith
Felix and Dale Veelle in 19.4
seconds. Duane Felix won the
Hard Hit in 13 chops. In the
Single Buck Keith Felix won in
42 seconds and Duane Flix
won the Standing Block in
46.45 seconds. All first place
winners received trophies and
other prizes that were donated
by Clackamas County
businesses.
The Video Technology
Department and Storer Cable
TV filmed the Timber Fest
events. After the College
receives a copy of the film, they
will show it. Store Cable TV
will also show the film on their
cable systems.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
HAVE YOU CONSIDERED A CAREER
TEACHING INDUSTRIAL ARTS OR
VOCATIONAL TRADE AND IN­
DUSTRIAL EDUCTION?
Fetal Facts
pass along to Hatfield. “There
‘Stepparents survival’
workshop scheduled
page 4
will be a much bigger gift for
him (Hatfield) when the by-
pass is completed,” Groener
said.
Profits from the Timber
Fest and Hoedown were ex­
pected to reach $3,000, but
with fewer people attending the
dance them expected only
$1,000 was made. “The band
was great and we were hoping
to do better in money intake,”
Buckley commented.
At the top of the greased
pole was a $20 bill and Lynn
Pruit was the one to reach it. In
“Cigarette Rolling,” Steve
Vohs had the winning smoke.
Albert Schroeder won the
Chocker Set in 18 seconds.
Joe Go.nzalas and Randy
Minyard won the “Peavy Log
Roll” in 42.1 seconds.
The unborn
| child does hot
f live in a dark,
I
I
1
[
soundless en- I
vironment but is I
i
responsive to
pain, touch,
\
\
i cold, sound and
I light.
I
OREGON
1
j
I RIGHT TO LIFE /
V
7
7
EDUCATION
FOUNDATION
Transfer up to 108 credits toward a teaching
degree in industrial education at Oregon
State University. Contact your advisor or in­
dustrial education, Oregon State University,
phone 754-2733.
Clackamas Community College