The print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1977-1989, May 20, 1981, Page 5, Image 5

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    ■Focus ’ seminar to deal with
elf esteem, proper outlook
By Tina Riggs
Of The Print
I Changing your language can
Khange your life. Such is the
■philosophy of 'College
Humanities Instructor Phyllis
■Thompson. Thompson will be
directing a Focus on " Women
Seminar entitled, “Change
■four Language. Change Your
life,” on May 21, at 7 p.m., ini
■DC 117. The seminar, will
■ollow the usual three-hour for-
■nat and a fee of two dollars is
■required.
I The main topic of the lecture
■s convincing people that what
■hey say about themselves and
■what others say about them has
la definite effect ort their lives.
College arts
I The College art faculty will
I exhibit their latest artworks in a
■special showing May .27
■through June 3 in the Pauling
■Center lobby. A reception for
■the artists will be held'May 27
■at 7 ptm, in the Pauling
I Center.
I Norm Bursheim, department
chairperson, will display a
series of black and white prints
including depictions of man-
palas (wheels of life).
Leland. John and Erik San-
I dgren will display paintings of
I [varied subject matter in- both
I [watercolor and oil.
I Nancy Travers and Les Tip-,
[ton will exhibit ceramic work,
[watercolors and sculpture.
| Commented Norman Bur-
I sheim, art department chair-
I Iman, “I think it’s going to be
| [pretty good. Everybody in the
I ¡Art Department is really up for
I it.”
The power of language is
very pervasive in life,” stated
Thompson, "It affects every
culture, age group and sex.”
Although, at this time only
women are enrolled for the
seminar, Thompson feels that
the topic involves not only
women but any person wishing
to improve their personal
outlook and the way others
perceive them. Thompson
feels that thinking before
speaking is very impqrtant.
Saying something regrettable
and then in hopes of erasing
the comment, saying “I take
that back,” or “I was just kid­
ding” is unacceptable to the
recipient of the comment,
I n the art s
because the damage is already
done.
Explained Thompson, “If
people can be convinced that it
matters what they say, they’ll
think twice before they speak.”.
Also discussed will be sexism in
language and fulfilling self
goals. While focusing primarily
on women, Thompson feels
both .of these topics concern
men and women alike. A good
self image is important in deal­
ing with other people, no mat­
ter who you are. Summarized
Thompson/ “Anyone that usds
these methods will find them
helpful. They will be much
more successful, not necessari­
ly jn terms of money, but in
every day life.”
~
The ’50s hit musical “Bye Bye, Birdie,” is running every Thurs­
day through Saturday until June 13, on the Civic Theater
Mainstage. Curtain rises at 8:30 p.m. Stephen Sondheim’s
“Company” opened May 7, at the Lake Oswego Community
Theater and will run each week through June 13. For tickets and
additional information, call 635-3901.
The llth season of Chamber Music Northwest begins June 22
at Reed College as a roster of acclaimed musicians will open the
season with chamber works from Beethoven, Brahms and Elliot
Carter. Music Director David Shifrin will also present works from
such composers as Mozart, Shubert, Rossini, Chópin, Tchaikov­
sky, Ravel, -Bartók, Liszt and Richard Strauss. For subscription
tickets, phone 229-4079.
' “Don Pasquale,” the final production of this season’s Portland
Opéra Association schedule, goes into production May 23, 27, 30
at the Civic Auditorium. It is the story of an elderly 'bachelor in the
early 19th century Rome and his trials when he decides to marry.
The best seating is available the first two nights, as much of the
third performance is sold to season ticket holders. Tickets are
available at the Opera Association box office (248-5322), the
Civic Auditorium, and Stevens and Sons Jewelers in the Lloyd
Center,
• * * • •
THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE MAN BEHIND
THE MASK AND THE LEGEND BEHIND THE MAN.
Mp
TM
Jazz night
I The cool contemporary jazz
I [sounds oh LeRoy Anderson’s
I award-winning Stage Band will
I be featured in the Spring Jazz
Night Concert tonight at 7:30
Ip.m. in the Community Center
[Mall.
I The CCC Swing Choir,
I under the direction of Jean
[Elliot, will also' perform ,at this
I [popular musical evening.
| Sound recording students
[ Don Megrath of Gladstone and
[Grant Cunningham of Molalla
[will be . honored- with
| “Downbeat Magazine’s” award
[for producing the “Best
[ Engineered Studio Recording.”
■The students entered the na-
I tional high school and college
■ competition with their album
■ recording, “Award Winners,”
I featuring the College 1980 Jazz
■ Ensemble.
[ Phil Fmezrud of Apple Music
I of Portland, “Downbeat
■ Magazine’s” local represen-
I tative, will present the award at
I 8 p.m.
| Admission is $1. For addi-
| tional information, contact the
■ music department at ext 434.
■ Wednesday, May 20, 1981
The loyal friend he trusted. The woman fate denied him.
The great silver stallion he rode. And his consuming love of justice.
"THE LEGEND OF THE LONE RANGER”
LORD GRADE and JACK WRATHER Present A MARTIN STARGER Production
Starring KLINT0N SPILSBURY MICHAEL HORSE CHRISTOPHER LLOYD and JASON ROBARDS as PRESIDENT ULYSSES S. GRANT
Executive Producer MARTIN STARGER Screenplay by IVAN GOFF & BEN ROBERTS and MICHAEL KANE and WILLIAM ROBERTS
Adaptation by JERRY DERLOSHON Original Music by JOHN BARRY Director of Photography LASZLO KOVACS, A.S.C.
Produced by WALTER COBLENZ Directed by WILLIAM A., FR AKE R distributed by universal pictures and associated film distribution corporation
"The Man in the Mask” Sung by MERLE HAGGARD
Original Soundtrack Available on MCA Records
PANAVBION*
©ITC/Wrather Productions 1981
©1981 UNIVERSAL CITY STUDIOS, INC.
PG| parental guidance suggested
SOME MATERIAL MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN
STARTS FRIDAY MAY 22ND AT SPECIALLY SELECTED THEATRES
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