The print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1977-1989, February 27, 1980, Page 6, Image 6

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    As athletic career attests
Anderson takes
beating in stride
By Kelly Laughlin
Of The Print
As a postman-guard-forward
for the Clackamas cagers this
season, Rob Anderson likes to
“mix things up,” he said.
So after Anderson pumped
in 50 late-season points to bag
a new National Junior College
Athletic Association scoring
record, he wasn’t surprised, or
even upset, when other teams
started “beating the daylights
out of him,” said Cougar
Coach Royce Kiser. “If Rob
wasn’t so durable, he probably
would have been injured.”
Anderson’s durability goes
beyond the four cold walls of
the basketball court. A sports
enthusiast since his childhood,
the Lake Oswegan .“can’t
remember when I wasn’t
playing one sport or another,”
he said.
o
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For one, he’s surrounded by
a family prone to athletics. His
younger brother, Todd, is a
guard for the Lakeridge High
School roundball team, and his
sister plays for the University of
Oregon women’s team.
Anderson hasn’t done so
badly in his own right, either.
As an all-state quarterback for
his home-town high school in
Annandale, Va., he delivered
his team to a four-season, six-
loss slate. He played second-
string
punter
for
the
Washington State Huskies in
the ’77-’78 season, and did
a little scrimmage quarter-
Lucky for Coach Kiser. Fif­
teen pounds lighter, Anderson
is averaging 23 points per con­
test, firing nearly .500 from the
field, canning 81-92 free
throws in league play, 106
rebounds in 23 games, 299
total points in 13 games, and
his 50-point performance ver­
sus Southwestern Oregon
Community College earlier in
the season.
It was not Anderson’s first
50-point game, he said. “In
high school I did it, and I
played much the same way I
do now, every position on the
court I’m comfortable with.”
Some call it finesse, others
claim it’s just plain muscle
which allows Anderson to
challenge an opposing forward
from 15 feet out, or, with equal
agility, burn a player inside.
“He’s pretty uncanny,” said
Kiser. “It’s very rare that you
find that kind of versatility in a
IT’S ALL IN THE WRIST—Anderson shows the form n
made him one of the biggest threats in the league. Phi
by Duffy Coffman.
ball player. He senses where
the ball is to get his own
rebound, and is surprisingly
quick underneath the basket.”
With the season almost over
for the Cougars, Anderson said
his future with the Cougars is
uncertain. “I might be herd
somewhere else. I’ll just ha
to wait and see.”
Where ever Anderson gdl
though, you can bet he'll
mixing it up, one wayl
another.
Cagers make OCCAA playoffs; barelu
By Brian Rood
Of The Print
What appeared to be the end
of the season for the men’s
basketball team apparently will
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backing.
Anderson could have played
out his option at Washington,
or played for the U of O or
Oregon State, but instead
chose to move to Lake Oswego
with his family,' and live in the
local area.
Between jobs, Anderson had
a chance to dabble in his ac­
customed pastimes. When
Kiser spotted him, Anderson
was playing a little sandlot sof­
tball. He was a little over­
weight, but willing to play for
Clackamas.
AFTER MARCH 20,1980
WE U Fin
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I
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I
not be the end as the Cougs,
touched by good fortune, have
been hoisted a notch in the
standings and have qualified
for the final OCCAA playoff
spot.
The
situation
reads
something like this: The Cougs
had two games left in the 1979-
80 campaign. Those games
were held last Wednesday
against Chemeketa and Lane
Community Colleges, the
Cougar team lost. But, ap­
parently one of the Lane
players had falsified some
preliminary academic records
in order to be eligible for Lane’s
basketball season. When the
official transcripts arrived the
discrepancy was noted and of­
ficials of the college im-
mediately notified the OCCAA
athletic board.
College sports information
officer Doug Roberts had not
received all the details of the
situation at press time last night
but did say that, “We are in the
playoffs, taking the fourth spot
vacated by Lane.” Roberts also
<
said,
“Lane will not have to for­
j
feit
all of their games because
j the player was not a starter, but
,
will
have to forfeit at least the
,
games
against us, due to him
playing in those games.”
The forfeiture by the Lane
Titans will mean the Cougs will
] play the third place finisher,
SWOCC, in Coos Bay on
.
I
|
I
Thursday night in a si
elimination contest. The |
ner of that game will play I
loser of the first place til
breaker game tonight betwel
Chemeketa and Mt. Hoodj
Randall Gym at 7:30 p.m T1
two surviving teams w
represent the OCCAA in I
regional tournament.
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,
I
LARGE
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Room I
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Studying
Happy Hour
4-6 I
Every Day
j
Clackamas Community oiled