The print. (Oregon City, Oregon) 1977-1989, January 24, 1979, Page 6, Image 6

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    For science facility
Building plans in state’s
“Many of the classrooms are
By Scott Starnes
overcrowded resulting in ex­
Of The Print
pensive programs not being
A legislative decision regar­
utilized to their full potential.
ding the appropriation of state
Secondly, the trailers cost the
funds towards the College’s
College twice that of the per­
new science facility could
manent buildings in utilities and
possibly make the new com­
maintenance,” Scott said.
plex a reality as early as next
Scott added that the trailers
fall, said Charles Scott, College
currently in use were only in­
chairperson of math, science
tended to be used for at most
and engineering.
10 years before they became
Scott, on the College faculty
worn out and this is the eleven­
since 1969, said that he has
th year of their use. “Many
been in contact with various ar­
students have been turned
chitects who specialize in solar-
away from the Orchard Center
adapted design and construc­
due to its leakage problems and
tion. “Although the proposed
awkward location.”
construction of a new science
If the state legislature ap­
wing is first on the College’s list
of building priorities, it’s placed
proves of the College’s science
proposal, bids concerning con­
sixth on the governor’s. The
struction will begin in March or
governor’s budget has allotted
enough funds for up to four
April. Reportedly, the state
needed building proposals
pays up to 65 percent of
building costs if approved and
through out the state’s school
districts,” Scott said. “We are
the College must come up with
the difference, Scott said. “The
presently issuing brochures and
loss of funds in the College’s
arguments in favor of the con­
struction of the science facility
serial levy budget should not
to the legislators whose ap­
hurt the prospects of the new
proval we need.”
building. It’s just that were not
Scott said that many
going to have that little extra
gravy or funds to work with,”
arguments in favor of the new
Scott said.
construction of the science
facility are reasonable and
If all goes as planned, con­
should prove the necessity of
struction should begin this fall.
its
construction
to
the
The science facility will be
legislators. Scott believes the 1 situated on the south end of the
modular buildings where scien­ campus where the present
ce classes are currently taught temporary parking lot exists
are inferior when compared today, Scott said. The science
with the College’s ever in­ building will create a wind block
creasing student enrollment.
which should make the com-
«
Proposed science facility will be three buildings located in current
parking lot next to Barlow Hall.
muting between buildings a lit­
tle warmer. But this isn’t its
location’s true purpose, Scott
said.
The building has been
carefully designed so that its
heating and ventilation will be
controlled by the elements and
not solely by the boiler room.
“Lobbies designed with a
greenhouse effect will concen;
trate heat to this area and be
Nowm
Oregon!
College,” Scott said.
Right now, student
desperately needed to
the need of the new
building to the legislati
been proven in years]
constant voiced con
way of telephone, bi
and self-interest helpi
the legislators’ decision
Students interestec
fering ideas into this a
are unaware of the fa
cerning the science
may obtain them by cc
the science departmr
will be more than glai
plain them in full det?
said.
pumped
to
classrooms
throughout the complex.
Massive solar panels and
skylights have been incor­
porated into the three-building
complex which can ultimately
be used for heat’ and power in
the near future if necessary,”
Scott said. Rooms have been
designed so that they will
receive optimum sunlight ex­
posure in the winter and op­
timum shade in the summer,
he added.
“The new complex should
encourage more science par­
ticipation which would create
more Full Time Equivalency
(FTE)
students
at
the
‘What to do until
topic to be discu
By Leanne Lally
New easy-to-hold Keg Bottle.
New easy-to-remove Twist-off Cap.
New easy-to-carry 12 Pack.
Our three improvements make it
easier for you to ei\joy the great
natural taste of Heidelberg!
Heidelberg
__ D»™innd C.n Thrnma
Heidelberg
Brewing Co., Thcoma
it .:
Page 6
Of The Print
“What To Do Until The
Psychiatrist Comes” will be the
subject discussed by speaker
Dr. Murray Banks, Jan. 31 .
Banks has served as a
professor of psychology at
Fairleith Dickinson University,
and has been a visiting
professor at San Diego State
College,
Memphis
State
University and others. He is a
graduate of New York and
Columbia universities, and did
hi? postgraduate study in
psychology at Rutgers Univer­
sity and Harvard University.
His clinical psychopathology
study was done at Bellevue
Hospital in New York.
His discussions are described
as “two hours of deadly serious
fun . . . he will do anybody
good.”
Banks has toured the United
States and the world speaking
on subjects such as “How to
live with yourself,” to “How to
overcome an inferiority com­
plex.” He has also written
many books, some titled,
• • •
“Things My Mother Ne
Me,” “Stop the Work
Want to Get Off,” a
recorded seven album
have become internal«
■ sellers. “Just in Ca'
Think You’re Normal!
Drama of Sex,” “A li
Love,”z and “Howl
Smoking in Six Days!
Dead in Seven!” are art
collection.
“Dr. Murray Banks
man monopoly’,” si
critic.
Get we
in clas
The College Fa
Women program
presenting
a
Workshop” Friday, 1
and Saturday, 9 a.m.
in the Community Cd
The workshop «I
participants on such
nutritional patterns,I
handle stress, and hoi
your own strings.’] .
Wednesday, January^