The Baker County press. volume (Baker City, Ore.) 2014-current, January 16, 2015, Image 1

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    Daughters of the
American Revolution
—5
The
Sumpter’s new mayor
takes the helm
—8
HOMEMADE
GOODNESS COLUMN
—9
Baker County Press
Friday, January 16, 2015 • Volume 2, Issue 3
Th eBakerCountyPress.com
•
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LOCAL NEWS: HEADLINE STORIES • LOCAL ARTICLES • OUTDOORS • AGRICULTURE • CLASSIFIEDS
Woman
New City Council sworn in indicted on
four counts
MOSIER ELECTED MAYOR, DOWNING VICE MAYOR
By Kerry McQuisten
News@TheBakerCountyPress.com
Gina K. Swartz / The Baker County Press
Kimberly Mosier and Mike Downing were appointed Baker City’s new mayor and vice mayor Tuesday.
By Gina K. Swartz
Gina@TheBakerCountyPress.com
The fi rst order of busi-
ness conducted at Tues-
day night’s City Council
meeting was administering
the Oath of Offi ce to new
councilors Ben Merrill,
Mack Augenfeld, James
Thomas and Rosemary
Abell.
Once sworn in, the
Council attended to the
business of appointing one
of its own as mayor.
Both Kim Moiser and
Mike Downing were nomi-
nated. With a vote of 5:2,
Moiser won the nomina-
tion.
Downing and Ben Mer-
rill were nominated for the
position of Vice Mayor,
which Downing won with
a 5:2 vote.
See CITY COUNCIL/ Page 5
Gina K. Swartz / The Baker County Press
L-R: Rosemary Abell, Ben Merrill, James Thomas
and Mack Augenfeld take their Oaths of Offi ce.
B2H meetings come to county
Todd@TheBakerCountyPress.com
Todd Arriola / The Baker County Press
Tamara Gertsch, National Project Manager with the
BLM, talked about the time frame from the project’s
2007 application date until now.
Friday
40% chance of snow during the day before
turning over to rain. Little to no accumulation
expected. High of 37. Low of 25.
Saturday
Possibility of a rain and snow mixture falling;
chance of precipitation is 40%. Little to no
accumulation expected. High of 38. Low of 29.
Sunday
50% chance of rain during the day. Mostly
cloudy with decreased chance of rain at night.
High of 40. Low of 29.
On Thursday, January
8, 2014, around 50 people
attended an open house for
the Bureau of Land Man-
agement’s (BLM) Draft
Environmental Impact
Statement (DEIS) for the
Boardman to Hemingway
Transmission Line Project,
at the Best Western Sun-
ridge Inn, from 5 to 8 p.m.
On hand were project
staff to discuss concerns,
answer questions, and
receive comments from
those present. This open
house was one of seven
held in the project area,
including one in Boardman
on January 5, in Pendleton
on January 6, in La Grande
on January 7, in Durkee on
January 9, in Ontario on
January 12, and in Mars-
ing, Idaho on January 13.
Brian@TheBakerCountyPress.com
Idaho Power proposed this
project, the result of which
would be the addition of
about 300 miles of new,
500 kV (kilovolt) transmis-
sion line from a proposed
substation near Boardman,
Oregon to the Hemingway
Substation near Melba,
Idaho, and the rebuilding
of fi ve miles of existing
138 kV and 69 kV lines.
The purpose of the proj-
ect is to alleviate existing
transmission constraints
between the Pacifi c
Northwest region and the
Intermountain region of
southern Idaho, by provid-
ing additional capacity to
connect the two regions,
and to meet current and fu-
ture increases in customer
demand.
See BOARDMAN TO
HEMINGWAY / Page 10
Your weekend weather forecast for Baker County.
Our forecast made possible by
this generous sponsor:
Offi cial weather provider for
The Baker County Press.
Locals attend
Blue Mountain
Forest Plan
Revision meeting
in Pendleton
By Brian Addison
BOARDMAN TO HEMINGWAY TRANSMISSION LINE PROJECT
By Todd Arriola
On Tuesday, Emily Mun-
sell, age 24 of Baker City,
was arraigned in Baker
County Circuit Court on an
indictment handed down by
a Grand Jury.
According to the District
Attorney’s offi ce, Munsell
was indicted on two counts
of solicitation to commit
murder, one count of con-
Submitted Photo.
spiracy to commit murder,
Emily
Munsell.
and one count of attempted
aggravated murder.
Munsell, a resident at 1356 Dewey Avenue in Baker
City, was arrested December 26, 2014, was initially
charged with one count of solicitation to commit murder.
According to a press release from the District Attor-
ney’s offi ce and other reports at the time, the Baker City
Police Department received a tip from one of Munsell’s
male relatives that Munsell was interested in hiring a hit-
man to murder her ex-boyfriend—who is also her son’s
father. The relative refused to commit the crime, and
instead tipped off police.
The local police initiated an undercover sting operation,
which resulted in Munsell’s arrest after she tried to hire
the offi cer for the murder.
Munsell was allegedly willing to pay up to $1,000 for
the murder, which included a down payment with the rest
to follow after she received an anticipated tax refund in
the spring.
Judge Gregory Baxter set bail at $500,000 with full
bail required.
The case was set for pre-trial on January 22, 2015.
Thirty-fi ve people representing a broad range of forest
interests, including some from Baker County, attended a
meeting January 8 in Pendleton, facilitated by the United
States Forest Service to discuss the Blue Mountain Forest
Plan Revision.
The Blue Mountain Forest Plan guides usage of the
federally managed lands on the Wallowa-Whitman,
Umatilla, and Malheur National Forests. The revision,
when fi nalized, replaces the 1990 forest plan. Attending
the meeting were members representing the federal land
management agencies, Oregon state forestry and fi sh and
wildlife personnel, timber and mining industries, forest
collaborative groups, conservation organizations, Native
American tribes, county commissioners, and local forest
access advocates.
The Forest Service released the draft of the forest
plan revision last March followed by a public comment
period. The public comment period has ended and For-
est Service personnel now have the monumental task of
combing through all the comments that were submitted.
“We’ve reviewed some of the comments. There were
about 1,100 comments received,” said Sabrina Stadler,
Blue Mountain Forest Plan Revision team leader.
Stadler explained that the January 8 meeting was
organized to get a diverse group together to develop
further engagement from the public and to work through
concerns brought forth in the comments.
See BLUE MOUNTAIN FOREST PLAN / Page 3
ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Funding cut may impact schools
Huntington man gets 30 months
3 fi nalists in 5J superindent search
PEO offers scholarships
4-Hers/OHA to raffl e pistol
DEQ fi nes Unity man
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