Independence monitor. (Independence, Or.) 1912-19??, November 02, 1917, Image 3

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    VPSRSPQNDENC
BUENA VISTA
Cleve Prather went to Port
land the first of the week and
purchased a new Ford ear. So
he is sailing around now. Good
for him.
The Ladies club mt at the
home of Mrs. M. N. Prather on
Thursday, Oct. 25, it being the
anniversary of "the birthday of
both Mrs. Prather and Mrs. J.
R. Loy. A good time was en
joyed by all present.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hall are
enjoying a visit from their son,
Dr. Hall, of Portland.
The next meeting of the Ladies
club will be with Grandma Mc
Clain on November 15. A good
attendance is required.
Mrs. M. N. Prather and Mrs.
F. L. Chown visited the club in
Independence on Oct. 23 and en
joyed the meeting very much.
Hope that some of the members
there will visit our club soon.
Misses Ella and Nettie Smith
and Miss Bailey, the school
teachers here, were week end
visitors with the formers' par
ents near Dallas.
Mr. and Mrs. Grant McLaugh
lin spent Sunday with the for-
CARD OF THANKS
Oct. 30, 1917.
To the Public:
The Polk County Executive
Committee for the Conservation
of Food wishes to thank the
teachers, school officers, school
children and public-spirited citi
zens who assisted in the food
drive in Polk county through
their splendid co-cperation and
enthusiastic assistance. Prac
tically every family in thecounty
has agreed to assist in the sub
etitution of food, so that wheat.
fat, and sugar may be conserved
for our own army and for our
allies.
The generous impulse which
prompted families to sign th
pledge cards was all that could
be expected. The committea
wishes to remind every one that
the real work is not don ? a i 1 the
food is not saved when the
pledge has been signed. It will
take great care, patience, per
sistence and soiTie extra expense
for every fa'nily to keep this
pledge, but let us not be we try in
well doing; let us not forget
that we are in war, and that
every true American citizen will
contribute his share every day.
Sometimes he will have to con
tribute money, but every day he
should contribute service, self
denial, co-operative effort. Let
us keep our kitchen card con
sistently before us. our member
ship card in our tront windw.
our pledge of allegiance to our
government aways in our hearts.
Your Committee,
Mrs. Conrad Stafrin,
Fred S. Crowley,
M. S. Pittman.
MONKEYS LOVE
THEIR YOUNG
Monkey iirv horn !h almost us hclj
less a conrliiloii as arc human IipIoks.
For the first fnrtntplit lifter birth they
puss their time In being nursed. In
sleeping nnd In looking nboi.it thetn.
During the whole of this time the cure
and attention of the inotle r are most
exemplary. The slight, st sound or
movement excite her Immediate no
Hoe, nnd. with her baby In her nniis,
she skillfully evades any approaching
danger by the most adroit maneuver.
At the end of tfie first fortnight the
little one begins to get about by Itself,
but always under Its mother's watch
ful enre. She frequently attempts to
teach It to do for Itself, hut never for
gets her sn!'.iii"!p for Its safety, and
t the eiir!ie.-1 Intimation of danger
seizes If In her arms nnd seeks a place
of refuge. When nlmut six weeki old
the bnliy In .mis to need more substan
tial nourM. nctit than milk and Is
tancht to p
er's fondn'-
t!:,-cs ; lie I
d.i.f..rJ ::!
nittt with :.
S SO Intel .(
oivd d' jith.
;! for in--If. The moth
for her elTspring con
vet. s !:er time to Its
i';'---::eri. nnd. should It
vr-icly end her grief
s f: : ': :i! v t cnuse her
mer's parents, Mr. and Mrs
Allie McLaughlin.
Mr. ana Mrs. J. K. Loy and
Rev, and Mrs
Armstrong wf re
bunday guests at the E. M.
Lichty home.
Ernest Chown, who is work
ing at Grant McLaughlin's and
going to school in Independence,
spent Sunday with hU parents,
Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Chown.
Mrs. Vida Johnson of Pasco,
Wash., is here visiting her neice,
Mrs. G. VV. McLaughlin and
cousins, Mrs
F. P. Ground and
G. A. and C. P. Wells.
Mrs. Sarah Collins of Dallas is
here visiting her sister. Mrs. F
P. Ground, and brothers, G. A
and C. P. Wells.
Mr. and Mrs. M N. Prather
and Cleve Prather spent Sunday
in Salem. Mrs Cleve Prather
returned home with them, after
a visit of several days with her
parents.
Guy Prather spent Sunday &(
ternoon at the Chown home.
Grandma Harmon and her son
Ed Harmon, went to Portland
Sunday to be at the bedside of
Grandma's brother who had a
stroke of paralysis.
WHY FEAR DEATH'S CALL?
Philosopher Regards Passing Away
Only Natural and Good Fears
the Unnatural.
They were discussing death, a little
group of men, nil of them In the best
of health and the glory of living. Men
of the world. In a isense, and enjoying
life to Its utmost, the subject of death
was Introduced by the announcement
that a widely-known man with whom
all of them had been acquainted had
passed away.
One of the party, according to the
Columbus (O.) Dispatch, said he hated
to think of death, that he was actually
afraid to think of It. He so loved life
that death seemed a terrible enemy
and he would like to escape It. But
the philosopher of the party only he
was not known as a philosopher until
he delivered his little preachment
said he could not understand such an
attitude toward death.
"I am not afraid of anything that Is
natural," he said. "It Is the unnatural
that alarms me. It would be unnatural
to live forever, ami I would hate to be
sentenced to such u punishment. But
death Is mcunil ; I nm not afraid of it
Billions of people have died; they are
dying i very day. Little children have
died and old men and women, ortd the
birds and beasts all puss away, und the
ttslies In tli,. sin s, and every living
thing upon the earth Is to die. Why,
then, should a great hulk of a chup
like myself, one who has hud and Is
having his time, why should I fear
dentil?"
Not afraid of that which is natural?
If only all of us could understand that
the natural is good and the unnatural
bad, what n splendid world It would
be for everything und everybody.
Curious Timekeepers.
To ascertain the time nt nlt'lit. the
Apache Indians employed a :."nnl fin
which 'be stars of tbe lienvciix wire
marked. As the constellations ro c la
the sky. the Indian referred to his
gourd and found out the limir. I'.y
turning the gourd around lie could tell
the order in which the constellation
might be expected to appear.
The hll! people of Assam reckon
time and distance by the number of
quids of betel nuts chewed. It will he
remembered how, according to Wash
ington Irving, the Dutch colonial as
sembly was Invariably dismissed at
the last puff of the third pipe of to
bacco of Gov. Wouter Van Twiller.
A Montncnis Indian of Canada will
set up a tall stick in the snow when
trave'ing nh-.-id of friends who are to
follow. He iruirks with his foot the
line of shndow cat. and by the change
In the angle of the shadow the on-coming
party can tell, on arriving at the
spot, about how far ahead the leader
It.
Flcwers of the States.
Twenty-six "tutes f the t'nlon have
adopted stole Mowero -official or for
mally agreeo lip' n emblems. Massa
chusetts Is not Mi" f l hem. although
there is a t: "f :
ing Idea, amount
'ii consent, that
our state flower,
-eript. If it Is,
in common with
S -o' a. f 4.nnectl-
lug ii'i'ic..'
ihe tr: . -uys
!"" '.'
ne have !.
the piovi-ic
cut has ;
it Is in I
!.;
I
!"'.i'cr, and-
tiliesf poS-
I'nb-n. It
Tls ere are
:. laurel
is -.. .-asily
. !:t:. d fur
Is I
I...
.r-l.
.1 !.;
I.f lb.
Live Stock Increase a
Sound National Policy
By Herbert Hoover, I). S. Food Idministritor
If we take the long vie of.
the world's agriculture after
peace we must assume that
EuroDe.with her herds and flocks
greatly diminished and the ne
cessity to allow the herd to re-
cuperate, will demand during
this period of recuperation the
importation of animal products
upon an even larger seal than
during the period of the war
During tne war period some
measure of supply will be ob
tained by slaughtering the herds
but this is burning the candle at
both ends.
It must be obvious that after
peace, with diminished anima
herds, Europe will have less use
for fodder grains; that she will
have a larger acreage available
for planting bread grains, and
that instead of so largely im
porting bread grains, as has
been her habit prior to the war,
she will import less. Our Ameri
can iarmers would De wise,
therefore, to realize that for a
considerable period after the
w&r there will be a very poor
export market for American
bread grains, whereas there will
be a wide demand for animal
products. Consequently, if the
animals be increased, there will
be a large demand for fodder
grains within our own country.
In other words, the outlook of
our farmers needs to be turned
toward animals and their feed
grains, not only now but for
many years after the war.
In the Food Administration we
have discussed these problems at
great length with many repre
sentative animal producers and
agriculturists of the United
States. We have often met the
statement that in order to induce
our tarmers to undertake this
changed strategy in production,
we must 6ecure lor him some
positive definite guaranty of a
profit. But if I were a farmer it
seems tsFme with the above facts
so well founded so evidently in
the farmers best interest -before
me, I should, of my own volition,
undertake such a policy even
were there no patriotic call. Be
yona tnis, nowever, it is now
vital for every farmer in the
United States who can to take
unto himself an additional 5 or
10 hogs, a few sheep, or a few
calves, in the national interest.
It is a necessity for winning the
war. And I cannot but believe
that every farmer in the United
States has the patriotism to
answer this call of his r ation in
the hour of our allies' need.
I realize that under certain
conditions a lack of confidence in
the stability of market prices
may act as a deterrent. And
further that this may sometimes
come from a failure to glimpse
an opportunity before cr.e. I
therefore wish to make this posi
tive statement; that, so far as
the United States Food Adminis
tration is able, through its in
fluence on the purchase of pork
and its products for exportation,
it will do all within its power to
see that the prices of pork are
maintained in a ratio to feed
prices that will cover not only
costs of production, but proper
remuneration to the producer.
By a system of license control
of manufacturers and distribu
tors the Food Administration will
further help the producers. This
system will tend toward the
abolition of speculation, the
punishment of profiteering, and
the assurance that the consum
er receives the product at a fair
ratio of the producer's price, and
vice versa, the producer receives
fair interpretation of the con
sumer s payment. Alt oi inese
measures, I believe, offer a new
hope for agriculture. v
While we give these important
assurances, I do not believe that
they are, in fact, necessary in
the stimulation of our produc
tion to the point which ia now i
national preservation. The
American farmer has too often
demonstrated his courage and
resolution in national service to
admit any charge that democracy
breeds a materialism that re
quires money guarantees to se
cure his patriotism. He wants a
square deal in giving his services,
and, with every power we have,
we intend to see that he gets it.
INSTANT ACTION SUR.
PRISES MANY HERE
This grocer's atory surprises local
people: "I had bad stomach trouble.
AH food seemed to sour and form gas.
Was always constipated. Nothing helped
until I tried buckthorn bark, glycerine,
etc., as mixed in Adler i-ka. ONE
SPOONFUL astonished m with its
INSTANT action." Because Adler-i-ka
flushes the ENTIRE alimentary tract
it relieves ANY CASE constipation.
sour stomach or pas and prevents
appendicitis. Ithas QUICKEST action
of anything we avr sold. Williams
Drug Co.
ENGINE CAN HAUL
TRAIN 2 MILES LONG
"A new.type of freight loco
motive has been built for the
Union Pacific System by the
Baldwin Locomotive Works,"
said Mr. J. P. O'Brien, vice presi
dent and general manager of
the O-W. R. R. & N. Co. "It is
of massive construction, and in
its operation will take the place
of two locomotives of different
types at present in use on
freight trains.
"The total weight of the en
gine and tender is 552000 pounds.
The driving wheels are ten in
number and have a diameter of
G3 inches. The engine is a coal
burner, witk a fuel capacity of
seventeen torn and a tank capa
city of 10,000 gallons.
"The new locomotive is capable
of hauling, on a level track, 22,-
930 tons, or a train of 305 modern
50-ton freight cars loaded to
capacity. In other words, it is
capable of hauling a train more
than two miles in length. The
capacity of the Mikado, one of
the locomotives to be replaced, is
15,553 tons, or 207 cars."
Catarrhal Deafness Cannot Be Cured
by local applications, ae they cannot reach
me aiaeaat-d portiun or tha ear. Tht-ra
la only ono way (o cure catarrhal uafmae.
and that la by a constitutional remedy.
Catarrhal Itrafm-ss la cauatd by an In -
named condition of the muuoue lining of
the Kustai'hian Tube. When this tulie le
Inflamed you have a rumbling sound or
Imperfect hearlna. and when It la entirely
cloeed, Deafness la the reiult. Unli-aa the
Inflammation can be reduced and thli tube
reatored to Ita normal condition, hearing;
will he destroyed forever. Many ciina of
deafneaa are earned by catarrh, which la
an Inflamed condition of the mucoua sur
faces Hall's Catarrh Cure acta thru the
hiooa on the mucoua surfaces of the iye-
tem.
We will give One Hundred Dollars for
any case, of catarrhal Deafneaa that cannot
be cured by Hall'a Catarrh Cure. Circulars
(res. All DruKKlm. 76c
F. J. CHENEY CO. Toledo O.
OATMEAL BREAD
1 cup boilii.tr water, 1 teaspoort
salt, J yeast cake, i cup luke
warm water, 2J cups white flour,
cup rolled oats.
Four the boiling water over the
rolled oats and salt. Cool Blow-
letting it stand hour. Add
yeast and sifted flour. Knead,
and let rise until double in bulk.
Mould into loaf anu place in bak
ing pan. Let ri.se until light.
Bake in a moderate oven from
0 to 63 minutes. The addition
of a spoonful of brown suarand
some chopped nuts will make a
bread that the children will enjoy
for school lunch.
BUTTER WRAPS
$1 per 100
MONITOR OFFICE
War Can't Stop Us
It makes no difference in our
appetites for good eats. But the
question of the hour is, "where to
get good, satisfying eats at
medium prices.' '
WE HAVE THE ANSWER
It is plainly in evidence in every
part of our store. It consists of
Fresh, Pure, Clean Groceries
And the smiles of many satisfied customers Is the
best of proof that we make good on every claim.
Calbreath S Jones
Views of Various People
There Must Still Be In
Germany Men Who
Prefer Justice to
Violence
By Presid.nl J. 11. FINLEY, Univcrilty oi
Sidle of New York
IT i boroininsr visible to Ameri
cans now ami w ill lie even clear
er when our losses come, too,
that the line held by Friinee, Eng
land nnd l?el;ium is our line. It is
urtually civilization's line, on which
nur men are bejrinnmp to take their
laees. K AUK NOT I'KSIIT
S(i l'OK KRANCK. VK ARE
1'IGUTINU WITH 1IKIJ.
One- who knows ninny (iennans
in tins country wonders what devil
?nn have possessed their brothers to
lead tbeiri to wantonness of which a
world hero who took )mrt in the
Trojan war would have been asham
ed. When I think of a (lernuin born
man in this country, the man who
enmcH first to my mind is the gen
tlest, kindliest, noblest teacher I
have ever known.
Now much be owes to Germany,
which he left in youth, and how
much to his Jewish ancestors I do
not know, but I wonder if there are
other such bou1 still in Frahkfort-on-tho-Main
and if they, too, have
been seized with this frenzy of hate
nnd passion for destruction.
THERE MU8T 8TILL BE IN GER
MANY 80ME PEOPLE LIKE ONE OF
THE ANCIENT TRIBES IN GERMA
NIA OF WHICH TACITUS WRITES.
WHO PREFER TO "MAINTAIN
THEIR GREAT MC&S BY JUSTICE
RATHER THAN VIOLENCE."
a
Refusa
to Sena1
Soldiers
to Euiopf Won
1.1 De
D s -rtion of Those
There
By T. P. O'QPNNOR, M. P., Iri.h
Nationalist Lender
Y
OU cannot hurt America with
out hurting England. You
cannot hurt England without
at the same time hurting America.
IN OTHER WORDS, EVERYBODY
WHO ATTACK8 ENGLAND, OR
FRANCE, OR RUSSIA, OR ITALY, OR
ANY OTHER OF THE ALLIE8 OF
AMERICA HURT8 NOT ONLY
AMERICA'S HONOR AND SECURI
TY, BUT DOES HI8 BEST TO PRE
VENT THE LIBERATION OF BEL
GIUM
if
Even n t tlioujriit it possible I
know it to be impossible to pur
chase Irish liberty by selling the
hopts of Hclgiuin, Alsace-Lorraine,
or tbe Armenians 1 would KK
FUSK TO ACCEPT A El ItKR
TY HOUCIIT AT SO 1GNOBLK
A sacrifice; OK THE LIBER
TIES OF OTHERS.
You ennnot with honor and de
cency argue that American soldiers
should not be sent out of AnierioH.
They ha1 been sent out of Ameri-i
ea, thousands of them, already, and,
apart from the fact that the con
duct of the war on a system of lim
ited liability is impossible, tbe de
mand that no more soldiers should
bo sent from America is eouivalent
to a demand that the gallant f el-!
lows sent there should be deserted,'
betrayed and left to the mercy of i
their (ierman enemies.
Allies Cannot Treat
With Germany Un
repentant By Lord ROBERT CECIL. British MinUter
f Blockade I
i
PREMATURE attempts at media
tion uro not usually BiicceHsf ul,
and 1 fear this is preiuuturu.,
I think we. all recognize that the
pope's motives are the best in the
world and that be desires peace ar
dently, as indeed we all do. But
the time is not yet ripe. THE AL
LIES CANNOT THINK OF COX
DUN ATION UNTIL THE CUIM
INALS ARE REALLY REPENT
ANT AND HAVE SHOWN IT BY
WORD AND DEED.
In writing this nolo the pope ob
viously felt the importance of not
taking sides and of maintaining an
absolutely impartial a-ttitudu. Yet
I cannot help feeling surprise and
sorrow that the note says nothing
of certain outstanding outragei
committed iti this war which have
done more than all else to make it
impossible for Germany's enemies
to trust hr or to treat with her.
IN ARBITRATION BETWEEN A
WOLF AND A LAMB THE JUDGES
ARE NOT FRECLUDED FRCM DE
NOUNCING THE DEVILISH TAC
TICS OF MR. WOLF.
BUTTER WRAPS !
At the MONITOR OFFICE
N. L. BUTLER
ATTORNEY-AT - LAW
Practice in all Couin
ECONOMIC and MILITARY
PREPAREDNESS
THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
la 44M t template caureee la ral am4
MlMUfto tfucatlM. affar fuH aaaartiMiittaa la
MILITARY DRILL, DOMESTIC SCIENCE
ARTS AND COMMERCE
Maw far affective, future eervlce. Yew eewntry
aaec It. m4 far free Illustrate baafc lets, "TralN
the Brala far Peace or War" aad "Tee Weeua aae)
the UaWaretty." A4eaee Regletrar,
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. Eugene. QrcoM
fundamentally necessary for our'