La Grande evening observer. (La Grande, Or.) 1904-1959, May 27, 1911, Image 1

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LA GRANDE, UNION COUNTY. OREGON. - SATURDAY, MAY 27, 1911.
ER WORItiMGS OF 5TE
NUMEZ" 13-1
f
15T LIE
, STEEL TRUST IS
THE SENATE
, GATES, PRINCIPAL WITNESS, MILL
AFFECT MARKET IF IT IS
POSSIBLE.
HUFCIF IS Tfl TFSTIFY
IM W . h.W III
Hearing Commenced In Senate Today
to Ascertain If Steel Trust Has Vio.
A lated Laws Gate, First WJtness,
4 Tells Inside Workings of the Big
Corporation Deals with Carnegie
Are Pointed Out.
. Washington. May 27. With John
Gates, the first wltnee3, eight con
gressmen as a committee today began
the investigation of the United States
steel corporation to ascertain whether
It is a trust or not.
I Is expected Gates, who, as'presL
dent of the Republic Iron Steel com-
- . pany, is fighting the corporation, will
' give testimony that will affect the mar-
kit. .
j Inner Working's to Light.
It is expected that Gates will try to
i" 'force a decline in the market. Follow
ing Gates, Judge Gray, head of the
steel trust, pustave Schwab, J. P. Mor
gan and Carnegie are also expected to
reveal the Inner workings of the steel
" trade. '
Gates' testimony was principally re-
- - garding the absorptiou of the Tennes.
se; Coal and Iron company by the
trust. In 1907, he said, men in tha
syndicate which included himself and
headed by L. C. I-fimna. sold out to
the trust on the basis of ten shares of
Tennessee for one steel trust bond.
They thereupon resigned as officers.
j Gates then said the steel bonds rep-
resented only preferred stock of the
steel corporation while the Tennessee
stock represented th real values. He
said the street trust manipulators bun
coed Roosevelt with a fake statement
that the absorption of the Tennessee
company was necessary to avoid a
panic. , - .
Gates then describes how Carnegie
finally was bought out for $323,000,000
for his share, while the Carnegie Steel
company, by Morgan, Frick and W. H.
Moore and other interested, after
Moore and Frick were sore: over the
loss of f 1.000.000 they put up for the
option for the Carneeie plant at the
sale price of $160,000,000.
1 Birth of Trust Explained.
Gates said: "In 1897 the price of
steel was demoralized and Carnegie
was held responsible. Moore and Frick
conceived the idea of buying out Car
negie. They put up a million dollar
option on Carnegie's plant at the sale
price of $160,000,000. Later they were
Andrew carnegie.
Portrait ! of Philanthropist
Mad Recently In Now York.
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Xy Wl Jw. X OusJ
1911, by American Press Association.
The man whose act-hfties originated
:. the sitaid trust, now under senatorial
probe and who will be a witness In
the trial commenced todav.
CONEY ISLAND IS
RAZED BY BIG
$"$3$t.$$$$. q $ $$$$
f CORN BOUND OYER.
" .:.' - . 4 S
Parch (Parks) Corn, the North
v Powder man accused ,or kill ng
, fellow townsman. Ed Lula. -ith
a beer bottle this week, waived
v examination this morning before
Justice Williams and wag bound
over to the grand Jury on $2,000
bonds. He will likely produce the
3 bond money. ' ; , ,
S A. P. Lyman, the restaurant man
iwhois accused of attemp'ing to
S kill Chief of Police Waiden by
making efforts to shoot him dur
. ing a conversation a .few days
since, was held to the grand Jury
by Justice Williams, also, this
morning and ve $500 bonds.
IE TODAY
LUNA PARK ftM.Y IXSTITI'TMX
STANDING. J
Maddened Horses Create TerrlWe'
Fright Loss $3,000,000.
(Continuea on Page Elgnui
New York,' May 27. Roaring and
screaming while they charged madly
through' the street, a horde of wild
animals gave Coney Island such a sen
sation as never before has been seen
this morning while flames licked up
$3,000,000 worth of fllmsey buildings
of Dreamland. Nearly 150 animals
freed from Rotock's show were cre
mated. The fire started in the Hell Gate
scenic railway. Six babtes in the In
cubator building were rescued. i
Fifteen acres were burned over and
Dreamland 20 other shows destroyed.
though Lena park was not damaged.
The Contest ends May 27. Subscriptions may be mailed In on that date In
favor of any contestant. Every payment on subscription, whether from a
new or old subscriber, counts In rotes. This is the last chance to make mon.
y count for two purposes at one and the same time, both for subscription
and votes. Pay your subscription and name yonr favorite. DO 17 NOW I
i
VALUE OF SUBSCRIPTIONS
Toting Power of Subscriptions for the Evening Observer.
JTIME By Carrier in By Mail in VOTES
m La Grande United States ALLOWED
, Three Month 1.75 1.00 900
Ono Wock ! al5 10
iOne Month .65... .65 150
ISix months 3.50.... 2.00 2500
One year 7.00. 4.00...... ...........6000
J, , Two years ......14.00.. . 8.00.... 15,000
V, Three yeara ....21.00 ...12.00 .... 24,000
' Four years 28.00. 16.00 33,000
( jrlve years 35.00..... -...... 20.00 .. ..42,000
Toting Power of Subscriptions for the Weekly Observer.
&i Months .75 400
One Year ..t ; 1.60 1500
Two years ,. 3.00 4,000
Jhree yeara 4.50 ; 6,600
our years 6.00..... .9,000
Five yeara , 7.50.. ......11,500
Votes at the above proportionate increase will be allowed on any additional
payments made by any subscriber who has already paid one year during the
present contest. This fact should be mentioned when extensions of subscrip
tion are sent to the Observer.
. HEAT STILL TERRIFIC, V
Fifteen Deaths in SI Honrs Show II u-
mldity hi Chicago,
Chicago, May 27. With ' 15 d aths
from heat within 24 hours, six of which
occurred between midnight and 10
o'clock thi morning, Chicago Is swel.
tering today as never before with no
relief in sight. The humidity Is most
oppressive.' It is reported that the in
fant mortality is the 'highest in the
city's hIstor Thousands slept in the
parks laat night. . r
PROilJJEXT PREACHER ON TRIAL
Charges of Committing Fraud Through
( mans Being Aired., ,
Boston, May 27 -Arrangementa have
been practically completed for the
trial next week before Judge Dode In
th United States district court in this
city of the Rev. Norman Plass former
President Charles H. Brooks, treasur
er and John L, Traphagen, assistant
treasurer ofthe Redeemable Invest
ment company, upon the charge of
using the mails In a scheme to de,
fraud. United States District Attor
ney Asa P. French will have charge of
the prosecution in person, and the de
fendants will be represented by the
Hon. Samuel J. Eldir as senior coun
sel, John P. Feeney and Francis M.
Carroll. : . : ;
The Redeemable Investment com.
pany, which to said to have been a
"get-rich-quick" concern with many
victims prlncippally In the east, was
organzed about four years ago by the
Rev. Mr. Plass and several Boston
promoters and business men. , In the
literature which the company sent out
liberally thrduirhout , the country it
was stated that it controlled, as a
holding company mining, farm and
timber properties in the northwest of
the United States and in British Col
umbia. 1 ' .
... After the federal authorities had re.
ceived several complaints from alleg
ed victims of the company, an Investi
gation was made and on October 13th,
1910, federal officials made a raid up
on the elegantly furnished offices of
the concern, confiscated the books and
papers of the company and arrested
Charles H. Brooks, treasurer and
manager. At that time the Rev. Mr.
Plass was on his way to British Col.
umb!a, and it was not until three
weeks later that he returned volun
tarily and surrendered to "the United
State3 marshal. Upon his arrival in
Boston he stated that he had resigned
as president of the comnany about
two months befor? and the prelimi
nary hearlne he nleaded nnt -niltv tn
the charge of fraudulently using the
utaus.
The unusual Interest In this case,
not Olllv in this citv but thrmiehmif
the country, is due tp the fact that the
principal defendant, the Rev. NoiV
man Plaes. Is well known in widest
circles as a clergyman and educator.
He was born at Claverach, New York,
May 4. 1860. and came from. Dutch
stock. He studied at the Hudson, N.
Y., academy; graduated from Williams
conege witn tne degree or A. B. in
1882 and with the degree of A. M. In
1885. In the following year he grad.
uated from Yale Divinity school as a
B. D. and obtained his degree of D. D.
from Williams ("ViIIpca in 1Q(U Tn
June, 1884, he married Jessie Char
lotte wneeier andi two years later he
was ordained to the Congregational
ministry. He held important pastor
ates at Detroit, Mich., Lincoln, Neb.
Medina and Cincinnati. O. Ha wan
state superintendent of the antl-Sa..
loon league of Rhode Island and Nw
York from 1897 to 1899, and agent of
the Congregational National Home
Missionary society in 1900. Than he
became professor of theism and chris
tian evidence at Washburn college,
Topeka, Kas. and in 1902 ha was elect
ed president of that college, a position
which he held until 1908, when he re.
signed and embarked In business, or
ganizing the Redeemable Investment
company. Rev. Plass enjoyed quite a
reputation as a preacher and educa
tor, was for many years a member of
numerous scientific, rel'ilous, educa
tional and economic societies and won
some distinction as the author of sev.
eral books and a number of sermons
and addresses.
12 O'CLOCK TO-NIGHT
Will End the Race For The
Observer Prizes ' :
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Subscription Mo Pur
poses Just Now-Pays for Your News
paper and Helps a Worthy Girl .to
an Educational Trip' or Scholaiihii
Act Before it is Too Late, t !
Mass for Veterans,
Washington, May 27. Cnrdlnal Gib
bons will conduct the miliary mars
for the civil and Spanish war veter
ans on the White House ellipse tomor.
row. President Taft and members of
the cabinet will be in attendance nnd
will review the parade of veterans.
RULES FOR THE FIJflSH.
The race for the Observer prizes will end at midnight, Saturday, May 27.
The Observer office will remain open until that time to receive subscriptions
from the hands of candidates and their friends. ' '
. - - v..rM ut strut, lit u yuiiui hqu will apply
Jn the contest so long as envelopes conllng; such subscriptions bear post
mark of May 27. In addition the following; statement signed by two witnes
ses way be written on the back of theenvelopet "Sbk envelope was mailed
In onr presence May 27; This plan is Intended to give to out of town candl.
dates and their friends the same chance , to gather subscriptions right up to
the last minute as to the La Grande city contestants. All such subscrlp.
tlons, to apply fa this contest, must reach the Observer by 6 p. m. May 29.
As a precaution,. La Grande candidates may call np the Obserwr at 4 p, m.
May 29, and ask whether their Saturday remittances have been received. '
The prizes will be announced In the Observer as soon as the subscriptions
are checked over and the votes counted out
THE EJiD IS NEAR. VIGILANCE AD HUSTLE ARE THE PRICE OF
VICTORY. ' " " v'
LINE-UP OF CAWDlbATES
CONTEST DISTRICT 50. 1 .- .
This district comprises the city of La Grande. The two ladles residing
in La Grande who at the end of the contest have received the most votes
will be the guests of the Observer at the Portland Rose Festival. ' :
HLrF, RUBY, Seventh and L streets.........
COTNER, EVA, 2.008 Oak street
STEPHENSON, MILDRED1, Care Star Theatre ....... .
mAnii.M, injiA, izui rourtn street
C0M3S, FRANKIE, 1201 D avenue.
NUTTER, MRS. B. B., 1708 1-2 Sixth St
DAVIS, ADA, 1313 X avenue
SNOW, ALICE. 1410 Z avenue . .
WILL RE'rtR SHORTLY BEF02U
-LEAVING FINALLY FOR FU.
Tl'RE HOME. h
43,281
3,257
32,886
24,015
16,323
10178
1.174
1,001
1.001
Madero Expets No One to Run Against
Him In the Fall Elections Will At
tempt to Pacify the Disgruntled See.
tlons Before Going to Mexico City -Diaz
Not Making Plans Public at
This Time. ,; : . ,
Vita. Cruz, May 27. Forsaking for.
ever the country which he absolutely
dictated for 40 years, former President
Diaz today sailed from here for Coatz
acoalcoa aboard the Hamburg . liner
VmlvsMov ft will a. . - m
nesday'and then sail for SpainVhls fu
ture home. It is expected Dias will1
stop at Havana to confer with Reyes.
His attendants refused to discuss his
plans but it Is generally believed Mad.
rid will be his home. - -: r ' .
Madero Discourages Others.
' Juarez, May 27. Madero said today:
"I shall tart for Mexico City next
week and no doubt will make several
stops to pacify dissatisfied people. The
insurrection against the present gov
ernment must be put down'. In Novem. t
ber the national convention will nomi
nate me for the presidencv. I hope
there will be no other candidates and
a square contest I will abide by tho
people's decision." :'.-.. .;
Madn-o gained his flrst victory la
politics today , when the Coahulla leg-
islature, acting under De La Barra's
orders, elected Carrauza governor. De
La Barra Instructed the officials to
recognized Jose Marie, Conora; Abram
Gonzales, of Maytorena and Chlhua.
hua. They will be Installed this even- .
ing or Monday succeeding Diaz's gov
ernors. . . v.-:- "1
, CONTEST DISTRICT NO 2.
This dlk.rlct comprises all of Union county except L aGrande. Tha four
ladles of this district who, at the end of the contest;, have received the
most votes will be the guests of the Observer at the Portland Rose Festi
val. : i" .. ;'
ROBERTSON, ZELLA, R. F. D. No. 2. .. 9-E90
WILSON, EVA. Union .................... ...... l'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' '' ' 91843
HANSEN, AGNES, Perry .
VAN Hni'SPN M47IPT. A1Ur,l ' V ' V
' "i"-"-, "Avv. ln.
62,801
39,364
t, a !
BAND LEADER IS
KILLED BY AM :
ACCIDENT
CHATTIN, VIOLET, Summerville
FEEBLER, FRANKIE, R. F. D. No. 2,..!.'!!.'!
CONRAD, NELLIE, R. F. D. No. 1 La Grande 13.301
RUSSELL, BETHEL, Elgin 14,441
ARNOLD, MABEL, Elgin I. 7,035
WEEKS, BIRNIE, North Powder v 7.000 1
KEEFER, STELLA, Imbler 1,151
WOODELL, ETTA, R. F. D., No. 1, Summerville 1,001
CONTEST DISTRICT . NO. 8.
This district comprises all of Wallowa county and Pine and Eagle valleys.
The three ladles of this district who, at the end of the contest, have received
the most votes will be the guests of the Observer at the Portland Rose Fes
tival. '
EAMES, EDNA, Joseph .............I..... ; . . i$9 565
ROUP, MARGARET, Joseph 173 513
BOSWELL, CECIL, Mlnam ' ' 31030
EVANS, MINNIE L., Wallowa . . . ; ; i7'183
LYRENMANN, ANNA, Enterprise 16 022
WISDOM, BESSIE, Lostlne . 7518
if limn .Tvin. t .
MAvvm, AuijBi, enterprise ' 8 000
WILEY. GLApYS, Wallowa 5571
BROCK, NETTIE, Flora .......'. Z,00l
PRIZES REGARB-LESS OF DLSTRICTS.
The three candidate who, at the end of the contest have more votes than
any of their rivals, may, at the expense of the Observer, extend their trips
on to San Francisco.
The four candidates who range next in standing, regardless of districts,
will be entertained at the Hotel Oearhart, Oearhart Park, By-the-Sea.
All winning candidates will be given side trips to all points of interest In
and about Portland; and will be taken to the leading places of amusement
and recreation.
Instead of taking a trip, any winning candidate may have music lessons
to the valua of $50 or a scholarship lB Whitman college; In the Baker City
business college or choice of several other colleges. In lieu of the San
Francisco trips scholarships valued at $100 will be arranged for, in case
sxchange is desired. , .
At any time on Saturday, the last another.
day, subscriptions many be turned In
privately. On Saturday no candidate
will be permitted to know how many
votts rivals are receiving. The voting
will be entirely secret. This Is In
tended to prevent the bidding off of
the prizes by candidates watching one
All candidates who wish may turn
In their reports on the last day In seal
ed envelopes so that their contents
will not be known even to the contest
manager himself except when all re
ports are finally in and opened in the
presence of several disinterested per
UNION'S BUGLER FALLS FROM A
HORSE LAST NIGHT.
Knocked Unconscious and Died Soon
. Afterwards Funeral Tomorrow. '
Union May 27. (Special) Herman
E. Perregaux, leader of the Union
band and the bugler in' the recent
horseback campaign of Unton county
was thrown from a horse last evening
and died at 4:30 o'clock this morning
as a result of the Injuries received In
the fall. The youn" man, about 28
years of age, had gone riding with
some friends at the race track and '
when his horse stumbled, he fell,
striking his head on a rock. He was
knocked unconscious and did not re-'
cover his mentalities before death or.
ertook him. The band Is - to have
charge of the funeral which takes
place tomorrow some .time and there
is grief throughout the city.
The unfortunate affair brings to an
end a pleasant connection between the
citizens of Union and the Swiss band
leader. Aside from his capabilities as
a musician he bad a winning disposi
tion and made himself popular over
the entire county by his incessant and
untiring bugling during tho reoent
ride over the county;
His relatives reside in Switzerland .
and arrangements for notifying them
have been taken.
Accident Peculiar.
It annears that his horse had all but
stopped running when he stumbled,
some believing that the horse did not
stumlbe at all but that Mr. Perregaux
dismounted In an awkward way and
the fall resulted. ..
Foneral at 1 O'clock.
The funeral will be held at 1 o'clock;
tomorrow. The deceased was a num
ber of the K. of P. lodge, of the Pyth
ian Sisters and these two orders will
assist the Union Concert band In the
funeral services. '
Opens a New Grocery Store.
George E. Stanafleld today opened a
inew grocery store at the corner of
Fourth and Y, north of the railroad
tracks. He believes the location Is a
good one for It Is convenient to a.
large and he Intends to carry a gener-i
al grocery line.
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