La Grande evening observer. (La Grande, Or.) 1904-1959, May 25, 1911, Image 1

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VOL X
DIAZ RES!GE3SP0S
LA GRANDE, UNION COUNTY. OREGON, THURSDAY, "MAY 25, 1911.
IB
zRO F
:S1
I
MAST KILLED IX RIOTS THAT PEE
SAGE ANARCHY.
President Forced to Hurry Action by
AH-Nlght Rioting In CapttoL . '
Mexico City, May 25 Minister De
La Barra Issued an official statement
ignation and Corrall's as well, will be
' sent to the chamber of deputies this
afternoon and that he would immedi
ately assume the oath as provisional
president d Interim. ' J; ' ;
...Mexico City, May 25. President
, Diaz will resign this afternoon.The
serious condition of his health and the
danger of anarchy, presaged by last
night's rioting, caused him to decide
to delay no longer.
After a sleepless night, Diaz found
big groups of person ' parading the
strefita this morning despite the rain.
Crowds carried banners inscribed
"Viva Madero," and other revolution
ary mottoes. Four were killed during
the riots last night , Members of the
diplomatic corps began to pay -their
.' last respects to the president this
. forenoon. ' . ' ; ' : ' . - .
It is reported that Diaz will first re
tire to. Hacienda for recuperation be-
'Jore", sailing for Europe, ; , ., ,
. , No Reparation for Madero. '
Both the Chinese and Japanese le
gations have protested to the Mexican
government against the slaying of
their countrymen at Torreon. How
ever, with Dial, on the eve of resign
ing, the whole governmental machin
ery is disjointed, and there is little
, probability of any official satisfaction
for the affair beng gven ether country.
This may be attended to when Madera
takes hold of the government's reinB.
DAREOW AT LOS ANGELES.
Proceeds Immediately to the Arrange
ment of Preliminary Trials.
Los Angeles, May 25. Giving the
newspaper men the slip today by leav
ing tlie train three miles from Los An
geles and taking an automobile, Attor
ney Clarence Dan dw, who will defend
the accused dynamiters, went directly
. to the office of Attorney Harriman, and
immediately started arranging plans
for the preliminary hearing of the
McNamaras, scheduled for June 1st
Darrow declared, "I am too busy to
talk." .
An electric searchlight to be at
tached to the barrel of a gun to aid
a hunter to see game at night ia a
' German invention.
IE Ul BARRA IS HERO'S
TO TAKE THE
OATH TODAY
1
I
ORDERED INTO
FIELD fli
BLOODSHED CA SCARCELY BE
AVERTED, SAT REPORTS.
Madero Fears lie Is Being Double,
v Crossed by Provisional Bead. '
El Paso, May ' 25. Claiming the
agreement broken due to the fact that
the Coapulla legislature ; refused to
elect Carcanda a Maderlst as gov
ernor, Madero today ordered war , be
resumed, and immediately ordered Col.
Castro with 1,200 men to take Saltlllo
where 1,000 federals are' garrisoned.
The Juarez army is also being prepar
ed for a march to Chihuahua. It is
believed Madero - feared he ia being
"double crossed" by De La Barra, and
apparently abandoned hope affecting
Diaz's withdrawal without further
bloodshed. The situation is grave and
unless the Diaz faction acts quickly
blood with flow within 24 hours. ; '',
' " ".Madero Refuses a Bribe.
Juarez, May 25. Balked In their
plans , for American lr lerventton due
to Taffs. "hands off" attitude. Wall
street Interests, according to Madero
today, are now seeking to buy their
way into favor with the revolutionists.
Madero said today a mail representing
millions in - American capital , ap
proached him and offered to finance
Madero's presidential campaign and
also to pay a part of tha cost of tbe
revolution, provided v Madero would
promise to grant certain concessions
when he came Into power. Madero
said he refused. ;? . - j
7
HARLAN STILL INYECTIYE.
Supreme Court Justice Flays Other
Members of the Court Again. ; ',.'
Washington, May 25.--United States
Supreme Court Justice Harlan's Stan
ard oil opinion expressing in stronger
language his dissenting views than
those he delivered from the bench, was
filed today in the supreme, court He
scores other Justices for "interfering
with the people, the source of all leg
islative power."
Ha believe the majority opinion, In
stead of benefitting business,, will re
sult in much litigation and that its In
jurious effect will be felt for years.
He agrees with the decision ordering
the dissolution of the trust but ar
gues lengthily on the word "unrea
sonable" in the decision.
Harlan also condemns strongly what
he terms the "court's judicial usurpa
tion of legislative functions." .
VALUE OF SUBSCRIPTIONS
Yetlng Power ef Subscription for the Evening Observer.
TIME
Three Months
One Week
One.Month ..............
Six months .............
On year
Two years
Three years
Four years .............
Five years
By Carrier la
La Grande
ee-'ee lTSeeee
65
, 3.50
700
14.00
21.00 t
24.00.. ....
......86.00.:....
By Mail In
United States
,1.00. ... . .
......
.....41 .65.....
...... 2.oo ......
...... 4.00......
...... s.oo......
......13.00
. . . ..18.00. .
......20.00......
VOTES
ALLOWED
000
4 A
........... XV
150.
...2500
6000
.........15,000
.24,000
.........23,000
......... 42.000
Yttitf Power of Sub-erlptlens for the Weekly Observer.
Six Months ......
One Year
Two years
.............. .... ........ .75 400
r - ...
i.ov...... low
................ 8.00. ............ ....4.000
Three years 4.50 ...1,500
11 AA A AAA
I ............ . W.UW. ....... i I,VW
i rA . . ...
I.uu..... ll.DUU
Four years
Five years
Votes at the above proportionate increase will be allowed on any additional
paments made by any subscriber who has already paid one year, during the
present contest This fact should be mentioned when extensions of subscrip
tion are sent to the Observer. ,. .
14
21
1
8
15
9
16
10
17
T F
1011
s
4
11
18
2223124
29M031
5
12
6
13
1920
2520271
Two Days Only
To Assisf a Favorite to Win a
" Trip or Scholarship
C3 CONTEST J ENDS
Saturday, May 27
Subscription Money i Serves Two Pur
poses Just Now--Pays for Your News
paper and'Helps a Worthy Girl to
an Educational Trip or Scholarship--Act
Before it is Too Late;
" VP
RULES FOIi THE FLMSH.
The race for the Observer prises will end at midnight, Saturday, May 27.
The Observer office will remain open until that time to receive subscriptions
from the hands of candidates and their friends.
From eitside points subscriptions may be sent In b ymoH and will apply
ia the contest so long as envelopes coating such subscriptions bear post,
mark of May 27. In addition the following statement signed by tws witnes.
ses may be written On the back of th envelope i "This envelope was mailed
" 1 Mf kmwim Wv 09; ThU nlaa l UttuU,l m
dates and their friends the same chance to gaUter subscriptions right np to
the last minute as to the La Grande city contestant AU such subscrlp.
tlons, to apply fn this contest, must reaci thejpbserver by I p. m, 3Iay 29.
As a precaution, La Grande candidates may t-H'op thi i Observer at 4 p. m.
Kay 29, and ask whether their Saturday remittances have been received.
The prises will be announced In the .Observer as soon as the subscriptions
are cheeked over and the votes counted out ; "
V THE ESB IS HEAR. YIGILANCE ANB HUSTLE ABE THE PRICE OF
VICTORY. : .r-: : .... .
LIWE-UP I W GAWDIDATES
CONTEST DlSTBICfjiO. 1 r.-,' '"v- .
This district comprises the city of La Grande. The two ladies 'residing
In La Grande who at the end of tbe contest have, received the most votes
will be the guests of the Observer at the Portland Rose Festival
HUFF, RUBY, Seventh and L streets.......,..,...,..........;
STEPHENSON. MILXREir PrA Rta Thoafr.
COTNER, EVA, 2,008 Oak street C.;.,..., ....t.. 28,607
, MAKTiis, I km A, 1201 Fourth street.
COMBS, FRANKIE, 1201 D avenue. ,
NUTTER, MRS. B. B., 1705 1-2 Sixth St i
WILLIAMS, MRS. Fred W., Box 804"
DAVIS. ADA, 1313 X avenue
SNOW, ALICE, 1410 Z avenue .
43,004
32,888
tst e
a .
24,015
16,323
10.178
1.174
1,001
1.001
CONTEST DISTRICT SO 2.
This district comprises all of Union county except L aGrande. The four
ladies of this district who, at the end of the contest, ' have received ; the
most votes will be the guests of the Observer at the Portland Rose Pestt
val. . .':.V- .' . .
ROBERTSON, ZELLA, R. F. D. No. 2, .
, WILSON, EVA, Union
HANSEN, AGNES, Perry
VAN HOUSEN.. HAZEL, Aiioel '
y 85,540
81,449
81,276
80,565
39,364
, 37,801
13.301
14,441
7,035
7.000
1,151
1,001
.FEEBLER, FRANKIE, R. F. D. No. 2,.,..,.;..,,....
CHATTIN, VIOLET, Summerville ........ . . . . . , . ..........
CONRAD, NELLIE, R. F. D. No. 1 La Grande .;..
RUSSELL. BETHEL, Elgin ........................ , ... . . .; , . '.
ARNOLD, MABEL, Elgin
WEEKS, BIRNIE, North Powder .:...(.......
' KBEFES STELLA, Imbler . . .' v m . ....
WOODELL, ETTA, R. F. D.. No. 1, Summerville ...i,.. .
CONTEST DISTRICT NO. 8.v;.t" '". ; ',,.;-'
s This district comprises all of Wallowa county and Pine and Eagle valleys
The three ladies of this district who, at the end of the contest, have reoelved
the most votes will be the guests of the Observer at tbe Portland Rose Fes
tival. ,V.; . .
EAMES, EDNA, Joseph ..... . ., . . . . . . . . ......... . . ... . . . ....... 188,666
ROUP, MARGARET, Joseph ................ 173,513
BOSWELL, CECIL, MInam '.U.!'.. 81,030
EVAffs, MINNIE L., Wallowa t ....... . . . . - 17,185
LYRENMANN, ANNA, Enterprise 16,022
WISDOM, BESSIE, Lostlne
MAVOR, ALICE, Enterprise .
WILEY, GLADYS, Wallowa
BROCK. NETTIE, Flora ........................................
itifijssn- '"-v.'.. '
PRIZES REGARDLESS OF DISTRICTS.
The three candidate who, at the end of the contest hare more votes than
. any of their rivals, may, at the expense of the Observer, extend their trips
on to San Francisco. : ;,V..
. The four candidates who' range next in' standing, regardless of districts,
; will be entertained at the Hotel Gearhart. Gearhart Park. By-tbe-Sea.
All winning candidates will be given side trips to all points of Interest In
and about Portland; and will be taken to the leading places of amusement
and recreation. . .
' Instead of taking a trip, any winning candidate may have music lessons
to the value of $50 or a scholarship ia Whitman college; In the Baker City
business college or choice of several other colleges. In Ilea of the San
Francisco trips scholarships valued at $100 will be arranged for, in case
exchange is desired.
7,518
6,000
6,571
3,001
At any time on Saturday, the last
day; subscriptions many be .turned In
privately. On Saturday no candidate
will be permitted to know how many
rotes rivals are receiving. The voting
will be entirely secret This is in
another. . .;
All candidates who wish may turn
In their reports on the last day in seal
ed envelopes so that their contents
will not be known even to the contest
manager himself except when all re
ports are finally In and opened In the
MINISTERS DISQUALIFIED.
3
Four ministers of Union county
are qualified to perform marri
ages. The new statute r;quiring
that all ministers and doctors of
divinity must file with the county
clerk tbelr authorization to: per
form marriages, has been com
plied with by four ministers of
this county to dati, and prospect
ive brides and grooms would do
well to throw a question or two
at their officiating dignitary. The
general, public Is perhaps, not
fully aware of the situation but It
is nevertheless a fact that unkss
these requirements have , been
complied with the ministers of
th state cannot, carry ony one.
The minimum.., 'e for filing
this information
goes at the rate,
folio.
V cents. It
cents per
v- -
iDttltllS
5f I FHTFI1 .
HOT LAKE SANATORIUM EMPLOYS
SKILLED SURGEON.
Three Big Universities Vte to Name
the Sanatorium's Chief. ' ' "
Dr. Robert B. Karkeet, a physician
and surgeon of renown, has been em
ployed to head the surgical depar,jucnent
at Hot Lake and as' soon as he can re
turn from the eaat.'w.ll assume; his
new duties. Dr. Karkeet was selected
from among three big universities
competing for the privilege of naming
the man, and Michigan outstripped the
university of Chicago and John ; Hop.
kins. , Each of these institutions were
trying to land men in the position. The
one chosen has been on the ground,
found things much to his liking, and
is now preparing to move his family
to Hot Lake where hV will assume his
duties Just as soon as . possible. 1
Dr, Karkeet was graduated from the
university of Michigan in 1907, after
having been on the staff of Prof. Rill
son," department of genealogy ' at" the
Ann Arbor, college, during , his senior
year. Soon afterwards he. went to
Schenango Valley hospital Ifl Pennsyl
vania and later was with Dr. J. 0.
Murphy hospital at Chicago, . Still la
ter h was in the Augustana hospital
and always during these years in the
places where the reputation of the In
stitution was of the very ' best. Gen
eral Manager Walter M. Pierce deems
the sanatorium fortunate in being able
to employ the doctor. :- v . ,
Competition for the place was of
the very keenest Anxious to gain the
distinction of placing their sons in the
biggest Institution of its kind in the
west, John Hopkins, the Universiy of
Chicago and the University of Michi
gan vied wlt,h each other to gain the
distinction and each school presented
the best material at hand.
tended to prevent the bidding off of ( presence of several disinterested per
the prizes by candidates watching one sons.
NUMBER 182
IMffiiES
F111IST0
THE DEEP
LARGEST BATTLESHIP LAUNCHED
FRO.U CRAMP'S SniPYAUDS
, ; THlS-FOREAOOyi .
IS f 01 GF n
Wyoming relejratlons end Naval Oin.
cers Comprise Gulls' as Monster
( Slips Down the Way to the Water
Grand Stand Audience Missing The
Big Sh!p Has Displacement That
Outreaches AH Other Ships, v
FIFTY FEB CENT PASS.
Union County's Average Higher Than
Generally Low Standings. :
Grammar was the stumbling block
this year to promotions from the
eighth 'grade in Union county. Not
withstanding the large number of tail
urea in the May (examinations the gen
eral average of the successful appli
cants for promotion , certificates st
above what it Is in other counties. The
eighth grade promotions are very low
this year, averaging about 45 per cent
in the state at large while Union coun
ty has already reached an average of
50 per cent and will increase that to
about 75 per cent, it is believed, at the
June examinations. County Superin
tendent 8. EL Brad fsdarts t&st Ca
grammar and civil government ques
tions were harder than formerly but
aside from these two there wa little
difference over last year. The per cent
of failures throughout the state was
much larger, however, than previous
ly. ; ;
most or met rauures .were in one
branch alone, grammar and civil tor-
ernment prevailing. The promotions
i in this county number about 200. -
. Philadelphia,-Pa., May 25.x-Surpas--sed
by none end equaled only by her
own sister ship, which la not yet com
pleted, America's latest and greatest
woiaiiiy, uiw iiaiiirtauip Wyoming,' was "
launched by a distinguished gathering
of naval folk and official representa
tives of the Btate of Wyoming, in hon
or of which commonwealth the power
ful fighter was named. .. V
, For the. first time in the many years
that the Cramps have been building
the big fighting machines for the Unit
ed States navy the general public! was
barred from, attending the launching. '
No ona, was, permitted' jCo" inter, the ,
yards without a , 'card 'bf admission. '
The enforcement of the new rule was
due, according to the explanation of '
the company officials, to extraordinary
conditions arising from the great size
of th Wyoming.' So huge is the mam
moth hulk that it completely filled the
great shed bultt over the cradle and
rendered It impossible to build the
customary stand about the prow for v
tlw, accommodation of the spectators.
Provision . was made: only for j the
christening party and ,. a. few distin
guished guests. . v : ,.'
4 The christening party,; headed by
Miss Dorothy , Eunice Knight, daugh
ter of a . former chief Justice of, the
Wyoming, supreme court and sponsor
for the big battleship, took, up their :
positions near the nose of the big ship.
A few minutes later there was a rend
ing ;.sound and snap, . the .' weakened
under beams gave way and as i the
Wyoming moved down the ways Miss
Knight hurled the bottle of sparkling
wine at the prow and exclaimed in a
clear voice: '1 christen' thee Wyom
lng." v.: V ;v...
The gigantic battleship slid down
the tallow-greased 'ways with ' the
lightness of a" frail lifeboat As she . '
righted herself far out in the stream
and was taken In charge by several
tugs the great, crowd , of spectators
gave vent to its. enthusiasm.' To the
cheers pf the onlookers was added the
deafening noise of hundreds of, whis
tles from the factories and shops
along shore and the many river craft
The battleship Wyoming is declared
to have no equal afloat as a Arst-clasa
fighting machine. She is of 26,000 tons
displacement, or 3,320 tons greater
than the British battleship Conqueror
launched a few weeks ago. ' ' ; ' '
The displacement of the Wyoming Is
6,000 tons greater than that of the
Delaware, which has been In commis
sion less than a year, and nearly 15,
000 tons greater than that of the Ore
gon, which scarcely more than a de
cade ago was known as the 'Bulldog
of the navy." . :' v ' ff.
The armament of the Wyoming will
consist of U 12-Inch and 22 five-inch,
guns and broadsides of 13 12-Inch and
11 5-inch guns. Ths 12 12-inch guns
will be mounted In six turrets on tho
center line of the ship, two forward.
two aft and two, midships. E,ch tur
ret is to be protected, by armor ; 12
inches and eight Inches thick, and
supplied . with, ammunition by electri
cal hoists from the magazines and
shell rooms below. : The entire han- ,
dllng of the guns will be. done by elec
trie motors. " '-
For defense against torpedo boat
attacks there will be provided a 'bat
tery of 21 5-lnch rapid-fire guns,' pro
r...iJ.
.- I
(Continued on Page Eight) .
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