Appeal tribune. (Silverton, Or.) 1999-current, November 22, 2017, Page 3B, Image 7

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    Appeal Tribune Wednesday, November 22, 2017 3B
Salem Sen. named GOP minority leader
CONNOR RADNOVICH
SALEM STATESMAN JOURNAL
USA TODAY NETWORK
Salem Republican Sen. Jackie Win-
ters was elected by her peers Nov. 15 to
serve as the new Republican Leader,
presenting herself as a collaborator will-
ing to listen and compromise to get goals
accomplished.
Winters is one of the longest-serving
members of the state Senate, having
first assumed office in 2003, and has
built relationships in the House, Senate
and Governor's office that she says will
help her succeed in her new role.
"Leadership requires that you have
the capability of working across the aisle
and working with others," she said dur-
ing a news conference after her selec-
tion.
Winters was elected to replace Sen.
Ted Ferrioli, R-John Day, who was con-
firmed to an executive appointment ear-
lier in the day.
Initially, Winters didn't seek out the
leadership position, but colleagues be-
gan pushing her to run, she said.
"It's an honor to have your colleagues
elect you to lead them," she said. "It's
really an honor when they actually reach
out to you to ask you to do this."
Four of the top six leadership posi-
tions in the Legislature are now filled by
women, as is the governor and attorney
general.
One of the relationships Winters has
built during her time in government is
with Senate President and Salem Demo-
crat Sen. Peter Courtney. The two are
good friends, but Winters said they both
understand their roles and she antici-
Sen. Jackie Winters, R-Salem, speaks to reporters after her election as Senate Republican Leader
at the Oregon Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon, on Nov. 15.
CONNOR RADNOVICH / STATESMAN JOURNAL
pates there will be times when they don't
agree at all.
But relationships are critical to keep-
ing everything running properly, she
said.
"I don't think that our friendship will
suffer as a result of this," Winters said.
"We both know that this process func-
tions best when we actually have built re-
lationships in this building, and where
we built trust."
In a statement, Courtney praised Win-
ters for her toughness and "inner
strength."
"She’s a true Republican and a true Or-
egonian," Courtney said. "Jackie’s wis-
dom and sense of fairness will make her
an exceptional leader and will help make
the Legislature work."
One of the reasons Winters was initia-
lly hesitant to run for Republican Leader
is her health; in August she began rounds
of chemotherapy for "localized" lung
cancer. But she announced Wednesday
that she is off chemo and her cancer is in
remission.
Looking forward to 2018's short ses-
sion, Winters said the Legislature should
spend the month on non-controversial,
achievable legislative tweaks, not major
bills. Democrats are looking to pass a
carbon "cap and invest" bill in 2018,
which Republicans have said is too much
to address in the limited time available
next year.
Lawmakers will be missing two of
their most senior members after Ferrioli
and Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin,
were both confirmed Wednesday to an
executive appointment to the Northwest
Power and Conservation Council.
"I'm hoping that we will still be cohe-
sive and still put forward some very
good public policy," she said.
Senate Majority Leader Ginny Bur-
dick, D-Portland, said reading out the
names of Ferrioli and Devlin as among
dozens of appointments confirmed by
the Senate Wednesday was "bittersweet."
"(They) will leave a huge gap in our
body. I go back many years with both of
them, I wish them all the best in their fu-
ture endeavors," she said.
"I don't know if there's anything sweet
about it," Courtney quipped. "I'm not hap-
py with either one of you two."
Still undetermined is which senator
will replace Devlin as co-chair of the
budget-writing Joint Ways and Means
Committee, a powerful committee due to
its influence on state spending.
Both Senate spots also need to be
filled and appointments for the remain-
der of the term are made by county com-
missioners in each district.
Republicans also elected Sen. Fred
Girod, R-Stayton, as Deputy Senate Re-
publican Leader and Sen. Dennis Linthi-
cum, R-Klamath Falls, as Senate Repub-
lican Whip.
Contact the reporter at cradnov-
ich@statesmanjournal.com or 503-399-
6864, or follow him on Twitter at
@CDRadnovich.
Winter is a great time to share joys of writing
COMMENTARY
WENDY RICHARDS
As the holiday season
approaches,
including
time off from school, it’s a
good time for parents to
consider learning activ-
ities children can do to
keep sharp, especially in writing. Kids
look forward to time off from classes and
families have busy schedules, but there
are opportunities to help students im-
prove writing skills during winter break.
Writing takes imagination and time.
As far back as I can remember, I’ve
loved writing. Although I’ll add that it
was hard when I was younger — I had so
many thoughts about what I wanted to
write about, and getting them down on
paper was difficult.
Many students and grownups would
rather visit the dentist than write some-
thing. However, there are techniques
you can use to inspire your children to
practice writing skills over winter
break.
Holiday letters, thank you notes,
cards
Some feel letter writing is a lost art,
but your children can learn otherwise.
Encourage them to write letters to
friends and relatives over winter break,
or send that important, and well–crafted,
note addressed to the North Pole.
Students can also personalize holiday
greeting cards, and write thank you
notes for gifts received. These exercises
enhance social development and help
children sharpen their geography skills
while researching recipients’ addresses.
Family folklore and fables
Encourage your children to explore
their family’s heritage by creating a
family tree or writing about your fam-
ily’s history. They can interview rela-
tives, perhaps asking questions about fa-
vorite holiday traditions or memories.
Each member of your household can
also contribute to a family newsletter.
Have everyone write a section about
what they achieved over the past year,
and what they are thankful for this sea-
son. Expressing gratitude is beneficial
for students and a great way to do so is
through writing.
Lead by example
If children see their parents writing
over the winter break, they’ll under-
stand it’s part of daily life. Invite your
children to collaborate on a story related
to winter or the holidays. Together you
can write a chapter every week, perhaps
on a favorite seasonal custom like the
Hanukkah Dreidel game, the candles of
Kwanzaa, or mistletoe.
As a parent, you know what kind of
writing your children might enjoy. When
you demonstrate writing can be fun,
they’ll want to do more on their own.
By making writing enjoyable at home
you can show your children these are
practical skills for everyday life outside
school walls. While our world is driven
by technology more and more, writing
remains a key factor to success.
An estimated 270 million emails are
sent daily worldwide, so using written
language to communicate has become
even more important. Employers are
also concerned about having a skilled
workforce; according to a recent nation-
al report, 44-percent of managers felt
writing proficiency was the skill most
lacking in college graduates.
Computers are useful, but I recom-
mend writing things down by hand. All
my students submit a handwritten rough
draft for every language arts portfolio
project. Remember that even famous au-
thors like J.K. Rowling started her fam-
ous Harry Potter novels by drawing pic-
tures of her characters and scribbling
notes on scraps of paper.
Even if your students choose to type
their essays and short stories, they still
should begin their idea with a rough
draft. Writing down everything isn’t nec-
essary, but the ability to write key ideas
and facts for a future story is pivotal.
I always suggest an idea web to get
started, where my students write the
 
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main idea in the center with supporting
ideas branching off. That way, they can
jot their ideas down and add more details
while writing their story. I encourage
students to write about topics that inter-
est them, activities they’re involved in,
or places they’ve been. It doesn’t matter
if your children use sticky notes or keep
an idea list on a smartphone – like any
skill, good writing takes patience and
lots of practice.
Writing also involves plenty of re-
writing. Adults do it routinely on pro-
jects at work, emails to friends, and
more. Writing is a process that flows
from brainstorming, drafting, and edit-
ing, culminating in a final version. Even
writing this commentary required many
revisions.
November is National Novel Writing
Month, and the Young Writers Program
(https://ywp.nanowrimo.org/) offers a
fun “seat-of-your-pants” approach to the
writing process along with some helpful
tools for students.
American author Henry Miller once
said: “Writing is its own reward”. Utiliz-
ing some of the activities I’ve suggested,
hopefully your children will experience
that reward over the “winter writing sea-
son” this year.
Wendy Richards of Oregon City is a
second-grade teacher at Oregon Connec-
tions Academy She can be reached at
www.OregonConnectionsAcademy.com
or by calling (800) 382-6010.
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