Appeal tribune. (Silverton, Or.) 1999-current, November 22, 2017, Image 1

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    S ERVING THE S ILVERTON A REA S INCE 1880
50 C ENTS
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A U NIQUE E DITION OF THE S TATESMAN J OURNAL
V OL . 136, N O . 49
W EDNESDAY , N OVEMBER 22, 2017
SILVERTONAPPEAL.COM
ODOT expanding
salt treatments
Silver Falls
schools’
process
criticized
Overhauled policy changes
being scrutinized by parents
CHRISTENA BROOKS
SPECIAL TO SALEM STATESMAN JOURNAL
USA TODAY NETWORK
The Oregon Department of Transportation primarily uses sand, deicing treatment and plows to clear roads and improve travel
conditions throughout the state. PHOTOS BY MOLLY J. SMITH/STATESMAN JOURNAL
Oregon prepares interstates
for icy winter weather
LAUREN HERNANDEZ
SALEM STATESMAN JOURNAL
USA TODAY NETWORK
After last year’s historically wet, snowy winter in
the Mid-Willamette Valley, Oregon agencies are pre-
paring to expand salt treatments on state roads.
Freezing rain, sleet and thick snowpacks created
hazardous traveling conditions throughout the state,
causing multiple car crashes and vehicles spinning out
of control on Interstate 5.
“We actually spread salt on a nine-mile stretch of I-5
just south of Salem near Albany for the first time,” said
Lou Torres, the Marion County spokesman for the Ore-
gon Department of Transportation. “The heavy snow
and ice made travel through that area of hills and
curves almost impossible.”
In Salem, drivers slowly navigated the icy roads
while Cherriots — Salem-Keizer’s public transit sys-
tem — experienced delays and cut morning service,
and entire roadways were closed until crews could
clear accumulated snow and slush.
While Salem city officials do not plan on using salt
this winter — part of a decision officials made back in
1989 in an effort to be environmentally friendly in road
clearing tactics — ODOT is expanding its salt treat-
ments on two major roadway arteries in the state.
More miles of road may be salted
ODOT currently spreads salt as needed 100 miles
north of the California border on Interstate 5 and 100
miles west of the Idaho border on Interstate 84. Salt
treatments are expected to expand as needed to 200
miles on each route, said statewide spokesman Dave
A loader with Marion County Public Works clears out a lot to
be used for snow removal in January along Highway 22.
“Salt is just a tool in our toolbox. That
doesn’t mean we’re going to use it
every time. We’re trying to minimize
the salt.”
DAVE THOMPSON,
OREGON STATEWIDE SPOKESMAN
Thompson.
He said the department started testing salt treat-
ments on highways in 2012 as a way to match surface
conditions for travelers driving in and out of Oregon
from California and Idaho.
“Let’s say you were driving north on Interstate 5
from California, where they use salt right up to the
See SALT, Page 2A
CREEKSIDE CHAT
A holiday drive to aid foster kids
The rules governing everything from animal dis-
section to sex education in Silver Falls schools are be-
ing overhauled this year, and some members of the
public aren’t happy with the process.
“We have not received anything about these policy
changes,” said Michele Finicle, a par-
ent and former school board candidate
who spoke at the Nov. 14 school board
meeting. She said the board isn’t “giv-
ing the public information in a timely
fashion.”
At the meeting, several audience
members requested access to policy
Andy
documents – present and proposed – as
Bellando
they undergo changes over the next six
months.
Administrators responded by posting online 286
pages of revisions now under consideration by the
seven-person school board.
At issue for some were proposed revisions to the
1989 rule on teaching religion in schools.
“It seems an attempt to expand or promote the
teaching of religion in public schools,” testified Jossi
Davidson, whose kids graduated from Silverton High
School. “(Teaching religion) is just one more reason
students see differences with each other. It’s just go-
ing to drive wedges in our community that don’t need
to be here.”
Board member Jennifer Traeger said she also fa-
vors the old language over the proposed new policy
“because it’s much more specific.”
If adopted, the new policy would essentially
change a six-point list of prohibited actions into a
short, general statement saying that teachers can’t
“promote or inhibit, openly or covertly or by subtlety,
a particular religious belief.”
Supt. Andy Bellando said the language originated
with the Oregon School Board Association, an organi-
zation now guiding Silver Falls through an 18-month
process to update its entire policy handbook. A year
ago, the board signed an $8,500 contract with OSBA to
help modernize all district rules. Bellando and his
School Policy Review Committee have been meeting
with an OSBA representative since last December,
bringing proposed language to the board section-by-
section. Each section must then have a three-month
public airing before going to vote.
The School Policy Review Committee comprises
Bellando, board member Ron Valoff, former board
chair Wally Lierman, and a rotating selection of prin-
cipals, he said.
But continuing to include Lierman on the commit-
tee after he lost the election in May to Traeger is a bad
move, said Sarah Weitzman, a parent and president of
Silverton Friends of Music.
“As a constituent, I would prefer an actual, sitting
board member be on this committee,” Weitzman testi-
fied at the meeting.
Traeger briefly aired the idea of creating a stand-
ing policy review committee, responsible for major
policy overhauls, as well regular updates throughout
the year. Other Oregon boards have taken on the job of
rewriting policy themselves in work sessions.
For now, those interested in reading Silver Falls’
current and proposed policy on teaching religion –
and all instruction, for that matter – can go online to
http://silverfallsschools.org/meetings/ and read “Pro-
posed Revision to Policy Section I, parts 1 and 2.” The
entire policy handbook can be found at
http://policy.osba.org/sfalls/.
JUSTIN MUCH
Silverton
council take
aim at nudity,
feeding deer
SALEM STATESMAN JOURNAL
USA TODAY NETWORK
Joshua Gorrell, a broker and design consultant with
Cascadia Mt. Realty, stopped into Live Local Market-
place & Café on Wednesday, Nov. 15, to provide specif-
ics for Cascadia’s “Christmas Cases for Kids,” which is
designed to benefit foster kids in the region.
“It’s always been a big part of our company to give
back to the community,” Gorrell said. “We want the
community to know that we support them just as they
support us.”
Christmas Cases for Kids focuses on practical
items, but toys or other presents that may bring joy to
the beneficiaries are also accepted.
The drive’s flyer, which will be going up around Sil-
verton, provides an itemized list of donations sought:
backpacks, gym bags, diapers, pajamas, underwear,
socks, books, small toys, small fleece blankets, tooth-
brushes and toothpaste, soaps, shampoos and snacks.
Joshua said Cascadia was in large part inspired by
Comfort Cases, https://www.comfortcases.org, which
states its motto is to “Provide comfort and support to
kids in foster care.” While Cascadia’s entry into this
quest is focused around the holiday – the donation
drive is scheduled through Dec. 15 – the company
hopes to see it expand, possibly even into a year around
Online at SilvertonAppeal.com
NEWS UPDATES
PHOTOS
» Breaking news
» Get updates from the Silverton area
» Photo galleries
JUSTIN MUCH
Cascadia Mt. Realty Broker Joshua Gorrell stops by the
Creekside Chat on Nov. 15,to share information about
Christmas Cases for Kids, benefiting foster kids.
JUSTIN MUCH/STAYTON MAIL
philanthropy.
Another inspiration for Joshua is Cascadia’s Princi-
pal Broker Christy Marsing-Barber, who he said grew
See CHAT, Page 2A
INSIDE
Life in the Valley.................4A
Obituaries.............................2A
Outdoors ...............................1B
Public Notices ...................... 2B
©2017
Printed on recycled paper
SALEM STATESMAN JOURNAL
USA TODAY NETWORK
Public nudity and feeding deer, are among issues
addressed by the Silverton City Council this month.
During its Monday, Nov. 6, meeting, the council
passed several municipal code amendments to ad-
dress issues that have emerged recently, including
one that prohibits “certain acts in public,” and another
adding a chapter to the code dealing with animals,
specifically prohibiting feeding deer.
The former emerged in work sessions held in Au-
gust and October during which discussions about pub-
lic nudity revolving around complaints of unlawful
urination and defecation had surfaced. The general
“nudity” element of the topic was modulated in favor
of focusing on the specific acts that elicited com-
plaints.
“There have been numbers of complaints, at least
of the public urination, by one or more individuals in
See COUNCIL, Page 2A