Appeal tribune. (Silverton, Or.) 1999-current, May 24, 2017, Image 1

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    S ERVING THE S ILVERTON A REA S INCE 1880
50 C ENTS
●
A U NIQUE E DITION OF THE S TATESMAN J OURNAL
V OL . 136, N O . 23
W EDNESDAY , M AY 24, 2017
SILVERTONAPPEAL.COM
Silver Falls challengers running strong
JUSTIN MUCH
STAYTON MAIL
In one of the most highly-contested
school board races of the region, Silver
Falls School District Board appears to be
headed toward some changes if Tues-
day’s returns from the Marion County
Election Clerk’s Office hold to their
trend.
Two new candidates, Jennifer Traeg-
er and Shelly Nealon held leads over
their incumbent opponents; Traeger had
a fairly comfortable lead.
Incumbent Ervin Stadeli maintained
a steady lead over challenger Michele
Stone-Finicle.
The race featured challenges to all
three incumbents (two in Zone 4), and in
one form or another, each challenger’s
resume included a background in educa-
tion.
Traeger, 42, is an ele-
mentary school teacher in
Woodburn with strong ties
to Silverton’s Montessori
community. Lierman, 55,
has served 20 years on the
Traeger
board.
Nealon, 45, is co-owner
of Nealon Medical Proper-
ties in Silverton. The Mid-
west native spent five
years as a teacher and has
a wealth of school-related
volunteer
experience.
Lierman
Koch, 39, is the board’s
current vice chairman after securing a
vacant seat in 2015.
Stadeli, 54, is a longtime Silverton res-
ident who has service on the Silver Falls
School District board for eight years.
Stone-Finicle, 41, is the de-
velopment director for
NWV Habitat for Human-
ity and taught high-school
English in Tillamook.
This race took on an in-
triguing complexion with
Nealon
the addition of a newly-
formed political action
committee, Silverton Op-
portunity, which on its
website described its mis-
sion as one supporting
“Silverton area women in
their efforts to strengthen
Koch
our community and its
families through leadership and involve-
ment. We support women through fund-
raising, grants, outreach, and educa-
tion.” The PAC actively supported Nea-
lon, Stone-Finicle and Traeger.
Verified final results
for the school district seat,
and other close races
around the region, will not
be official until June. Mar-
ion County Clerk Bill Bur-
gess said votes can filter
Stadeli
in throughout May from a
variety of sources.
“We will certify this
election by June 5,” Bur-
gess said on Thursday.
“Voters who forgot to sign
their ballot-return enve-
Stone-Finicle lope or who’s signature
did not match have until 5
p.m. on May 30 to come into our office
and resolve their signature issue. Then
we will open the ballot envelopes that
See BOARD, Page 2A
Chaplains
provide
hope for
patients
CREEKSIDE CHAT
CHRISTENA BROOKS
SPECIAL TO THE APPEAL TRIBUNE
Maybe it’s the little room’s uncom-
monly loud air conditioning. Or the
torch-like lamps glowing on the table
that holds the Bible, Torah and Quran.
Or the bubbling waterfall and shrub-
bery that blocks the outside view to the
parking lot. But the chapel at Legacy
Silverton Medical Center is a cocoon of
quiet inside a busy hospital, a place
where time seems to stand still.
Anyone seeking a moment of peace
can step inside. For those who can’t – or
don’t – a team of chaplains takes spiri-
tual care out into the hospital’s halls,
rooms and offices. Four chaplains,
mainly volunteers, provide 24-7 cover-
age for patients, their families and
staff.
“Our goal is to meet people’s spiritu-
al needs and offer them spiritual hope
in times of crisis and stress,” said Betty
Jo Steele, coordinator of Silverton’s
chaplains.
They are Quaker, Baptist and Catho-
lic. Among their collective qualifica-
tions are several master’s degrees and
pastoral ordinations, crisis training,
past medical careers, and hours of
hands-on service at the hospital. Steele
is a part-time employee, while Harold
“H” Nelson, Barbara Harrend and Don
Murdy are volunteers.
“It’s pretty amazing what they do,”
said Dr. Keith Haugen, Legacy Silver-
ton’s hospitalist. “They support and
serve everybody, not just the patients.
Those of us on the front lines don’t al-
ways have the expertise or emotional
space at the moment when it’s critical
to sit down with people.”
Both Steele and Nelson know what it
feels like to be in a moment of desper-
ate medical need, with life-and-death
thoughts and questions dominating
their consciousness.
Nelson calls it a “holy moment,” a
time of desperation where “God can
meet you,” he said. “People never leave
the hospital the same way they came in
– and I don’t just mean medically.”
For Steele, the moment was when
her young son was being wheeled away
for a major operation. In the waiting
room, a local pastor asked, “Are you
OK?” and she knew she wasn’t. For Nel-
son, it was discovering, just a few years
ago, that he had a brain tumor and other
complications from his exposure to
Agent Orange in the Vietnam War.
“You’re scared and exposed,” Nel-
PHOTOS BY DANIELLE PETERSON / STATESMAN JOURNAL
Participants fish from the dock during Free Fish Day on June 4, 2016, at the Silverton Reservoir.
Reeling in family fun
Silverton’s Free Fish Day to return June 3
JUSTIN MUCH
That first fish of
the day caught a
year ago at the Sil-
verton
Reservoir
deserved a certifi-
cate.
Free Fish Day
2016 coincided with unseasonable,
blistering-hot temperatures, Jan
Holowati said, which crimped the
annual event’s turnout somewhat;
lots of folks were heading to the
coast or to cooler high grounds.
But “a little girl with a little Bar-
bie pole,” was undeterred, Jan re-
called. The pole bowed with the
strike, and the youngster reeled in
a nice prize and lifetime memory in
the process.
“It was a really nice fish – a nice
trout,” Jan said, adding that the
first fish caught is among the hand-
ful of certificates provided at the
Nick Robinson helps Skip Bouskill fish during Free Fish Day in 2011.
See MUCH, Page 3A
See CHAPLAINS, Page 2A
Lockett named Silverton High principal
JUSTIN MUCH
APPEAL TRIBUNE
Silver Falls School Dis-
trict announced that Sil-
verton High School Assis-
tant Principal/Athletic Di-
rector Wade Lockett has
been named as the
school’s new principal.
Lockett will replace
Justin Lieuallen who sub-
mitted his resignation to
the SFSD Board March 13
with the intention of serv-
ing through the end of the
school year, which was his
first year in the position.
A district news release
said Lockett brings more
than 16 years of public
education experience to
the post. He previously
served as a vice principal,
athletic director and
teacher in the Oregon
Trail and North Marion
school districts in addi-
tion to coaching athletics,
mock trial and serving as
a National Honor Society
advisor.
District
officials
stressed that Lockett’s ex-
periences weave well
with his new position.
“Mr. Lockett lets his
students
and
col-
leagues know that they
are his highest priori-
ty,” said Silver Falls
School District Super-
intendent Andy Bellan-
do. “He has strong
skills in building and
maintaining relation-
Silverr ton B usiiness of t he Y ear 2 016
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