Appeal tribune. (Silverton, Or.) 1999-current, March 01, 2017, Page 3A, Image 3

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    Appeal Tribune Wednesday, March 1, 2017 3A
Lawmaker wants to make osprey Oregon’s
state bird, booting ‘unoriginal’ meadowlark
ZACH URNESS
STATESMAN JOURNAL
A Stayton lawmaker believes Ore-
gon’s current state bird is unoriginal,
rarely seen and needs to be replaced.
Republican state senator Fred Girod
wants to boot the western
meadowlark as Oregon’s
avian ambassador and be-
stow that honor upon the
“impressive and intrigu-
ing” osprey.
“Oregon deserves a
unique
and
dynamic
Fred Girod
choice for state bird,”
says Senate Concurrent Resolution 18,
which Girod sponsored.
Salem Audubon Society president
Ray Temple said he opposed the effort.
He said that while the osprey could make
a good choice, meadowlarks are declin-
ing and “need all the attention and help
they can get.”
In the resolution, Girod points out that
the meadowlark, Oregon’s state bird
since 1927, is also the symbol for Kansas,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and
Wyoming.
Further, although the meadowlark
was once “commonly seen when Oregon
was predominantly a rural state, the
western meadowlark is now relatively
rare in the areas where the greatest
number of Oregonians live.”
All of this pales in comparison to the
osprey, according to the resolution. The
osprey can be seen in every region of the
state and “better represents the Oregon
spirit.”
“The osprey is resilient, and its num-
bers in this state are on the rise,” the res-
GETTY IMAGES
The western meadowlark currently is
Oregon’s state bird.
DOUG BEALL/SPECIAL TO THE STATESMAN JOURNAL
An osprey snatches a fish from a stream. An Oregon lawmaker is proposing to make the osprey
Oregon's state bird.
olution says. “With its five-foot wingspan
and distinctive shape and markings, (it)
can be frequently sighted in the sky
above almost any body of water with fish
enough to sustain it.”
That the meadowlark is declining is
exactly why it should remain the state
bird, Temple said.
“Suitable nesting and foraging habi-
tats are few and decline in extent every
year,” Temple said. “Keeping the mead-
owlark as the state bird may in some
small way contribute to these efforts and
its further existence.”
Zach Urness has been an outdoors
writer, photographer and videographer
in Oregon for eight years. He is the author
of the book “Hiking Southern Oregon”
and
can
be
reached
at
zurness@StatesmanJournal.com
or
(503) 399-6801. Find him on Twitter at
@ZachsORoutdoors.
Silverton and surrounding
area site of movie filming
Straight talk
from someone
who knows you
Sound fi nancial advice
means only making
recommendations that
line up with your goals
and risk tolerance.
CHRISTENA BROOKS
Thoughtful guidance:
It’s how we make sense
of investing
SPECIAL TO THE APPEAL TRIBUNE
After four years, the
ghosts were back in Sil-
verton.
The cast and crew of
“A Haunting at Silver
Falls 2” spent 19 days
working in the Willam-
ette Valley, 16 of them
filming many scenes at
Eugene Field School,
empty office space, a lo-
cal family’s home and Sil-
ver Falls State Park.
The low-budget horror
film, expected to release
this fall, follows “A
Haunting of Silver Falls,”
produced by Enderby En-
tertainment in 2013 and
set in the fictional town of
Silver Falls.
The first film features
a
new-to-town
high
school student, Jordan,
who is pursued by the
ghost daughters of a
wrongfully
convicted
man. This second install-
ment follows Jordan as
an angry ghost from her
past joins forces with a
deranged convict to seek
revenge.
“It’s more about story
tension and suspense
than blood and guts,” said
Brian McElroy, the loca-
tion manager who helped
pick Silverton for film-
ing. “It’s a scary thriller.”
To create the movie’s
“Institute for the Occult
Studies,” where doctors
examine people who see
ghosts, the crew used the
interior and exterior of
Linfield
College
in
McMinnville and the in-
terior of the shuttered
Eugene Field School in
Silverton.
In his search for a loca-
tion, McElroy first con-
sidered the Oregon State
Hospital and North Sa-
lem High School but
eventually settled on Eu-
gene Field because the
building’s old architec-
ture suited the movie,
and it’s no longer serving
students.
“I could see we could
do what we wanted there
and not be intrusive. The
people in Silverton were
just great to us,” said
McElroy,
who
once
worked in Los Angeles as
a location manager for
the show “Beverly Hills
90210” and “Melrose
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
LOCAL ADVISORS
Salem Area
Vin Searles
SPECIAL TO THE APPEAL TRIBUNE
One of the movie’s villains, played by Bryan Chesters, peers out a window during filming.
The newly formed La-
tino Parent Club will hold
its first public meeting
for parents on Thursday,
March 9. It will be held in
Silverton High School’s li-
brary, starting at 6:30 p.m.
We want to make sure
Sheryl Resner Bridgette Justis
Michael Wooters Garry Falor Mario Montiel
Tim Yount
FINANCIAL ADVISOR FINANCIAL ADVISOR
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South | 503-362-5439 West | 503-588-5426 Keizer | 503-393-8166 Silverton | 503-873-2454
Place.”
In the movie, the final
clash between Jordan
and her pursuers occurs
in Eugene Field’s halls,
stairwells and basement-
level cafeteria. Also,
driving scenes for the
whole film were record-
ed against a green screen
in the covered basketball
court. After three 12-hour
nights of filming, the
crew wrapped things up
at the school on the morn-
ing of Feb. 20.
The Desart Road home
of Jay and Kim Lively
will also appear in “A
Haunting of Silver Falls
2.” Approached at ran-
dom by the company, the
couple agreed to let film-
ing occur inside and out-
side their home, which is
surrounded by trees and
outbuildings.
“They promised not to
leave any ghosts,” Kim
said, laughing. For her, it
all happened so fast that
she didn’t even tell her
neighbors before the
crew showed up, but she
and her extended family
enjoyed watching every-
thing from makeup to re-
takes.
“They showed up at
6:45 a.m. and stayed ‘til 10
p.m.,” she said. “They
were all so friendly and
nice … I don’t usually
watch movies like this,
but once I saw how much
work went into it, I’m
really excited to see it.”
At Silver Falls State
Park and the lodge and
conference center, actors
and crew contended with
torrential rain and even
some snow. As they
filmed outdoors, western
Oregon was pouring its
way to its wettest Febru-
ary in history.
“The actors were all in
ghost makeup, and they
were all wet down, but
they were so tough and so
great to work with … ev-
erybody did their thing …
and it looks great on
film,” McElroy said.
Another location used
for the movie was the
3,000-square-foot office
space near Ace Hard-
ware that once housed
the McClaine Street Clin-
ic. Its former life as a doc-
tor’s office transitioned
nicely into a hospital for
the film, said owner Jack
Holt. The city of Stayton’s
police department will
also appear in the movie.
“A Haunting of Silver
Falls 2” was directed by
Teo Konuralp and written
by Jesse Riffsin, who
Latino Parent Club meeting March 9
SPECIAL TO THE APPEAL TRIBUNE
Jeff Davis
Surrounding Area
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Mission | 503-363-0445 Liberty | 503-581-8580 Keizer | 503-304-8641 Sublimity | 503-769-3180
worked onset, rewriting
and modifying the script
during filming. Pro-
ducers are Rick Dugdale
and Dan Petrie Jr., best
known for “Beverly Hills
Cop,” “The Big Easy” and
“Toy Soldiers.”
Acting the lead is Lau-
ra Flannery as Jordan;
James Cavlo plays her
boyfriend, Larry. He and
twins Nikita and Jade
Ramsey, a pair of ghostly
twins, are returners from
the original “Haunting.”
Rounding out the cast are
Jennifer Dorogi, Bryan
Chesters, Dendrie Taylor,
Harry Hains and Clem-
mie Dugdale.
Derek Gilbert Chip Hutchings
Walt Walker
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Commercial | 503-362-9699 Lancaster | 503-585-4689
FINANCIAL ADVISOR
Stayton | 503-769-4902
Caitlin Davis Tim Sparks
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West | 503-585-1464 Commercial | 503-370-6159
OR-0000385391
Michael Kim
DDS
“Your friendly local dentist”
Brittney - RDH
CHRISTENA BROOKS
Keizer Area
that all families have a
voice and feel connected
to our school,” said Silver-
ton High School Principal
Justin Lieuallen.
The club’s formation
comes three months stu-
dent demonstrations at
election time in Novem-
ber degenerated into ver-
bal confrontations. Some
Latino students reported
being fearful and ha-
rassed, and a handful of
students were disci-
plined.
A group of parents lat-
er asked high school staff
and the school district to
increase efforts to make
their children feel safe.
Dr. Kim
Morgan - RDH
New Patients & Emergencies Welcome
Cosmetic
Implant
Bridges/Partials
Extractions
Crowns/Fillings
Root Canals
ENTER FOR
OUR MONTHLY
KINDLE
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AT EACH
APPOINTMENT
WE ACCEPT MOST INSURANCE
410 Oak St, Silverton, OR, 97381
503-873-3530 kimsilvertonordentist.com
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