The daily gazette-times. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) 1909-1921, August 30, 1909, Image 2

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    THE DAILY GAZETTE-TIMES
Published every evening except San
day. Office: 259-263 Jefferson street,
corner Third street,- and 232 Second
street, Corvallis, Oregon.
PKOkEJ, 210 4184
Entered at the postoffice at Corvallis,
Oregon, as second class matter. ..
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
; DAII.Y .
Delivered by carrier, per week $ .15
Delivered by carrier, per month .50
By mail, one vear, in advance. 5.00
By mail, six months, in advance...- 2 50
By mail, one month, in advance...- .50
f Fur was the chief and almost
the only industry . when we ac
quired the territory. But as the
fur trade declined the salmon in
dustry arose mounting from
$43,000 in 1881 to $1Q, 000, 000 last
year. Gold, at present, is the
most valuable product. Very
possibly,, as agriculture and other
industries arise in the next few
years, gold will become relative
ly unimportant. -
HOP
PICKERS
THE WEEKLY GAZETTE-TIMES
- Published Every Friday
SUBSCRIPTION -RATES
One year, in advance $2.00
Six moths, in advance...;.. I.oo
In ordering changes of address, sub
scribers should always give old as well as
new address.
N. K M00RE ; . -CHAS.
L. SPRINGER,
.''. .Editor
Business Mgr.
MAKING
MONEY
WHY HE DID NOT BUY AT HOME.
Girls Make from $2.00 to $3.00,
and Men Overtop This a Little.
LIKED OREGON-
Impressed with the future of
the Pacific Northwest in'agricul
ture, delegates to the national
convention of the ; Association of
American Agricultural - Colleges
and Experiment Stations have
returned home after holding' a
week's convention at Portland.'
Those in attendance expressed
themselves as surprised at the
manifest agricultural' wealth
here. The fertility of the soil
and the progress made in agri
cultural aroused much comment.
The visitors Were enabled to see
Various parts of the" State" by
special train as guests of the
the r various communities.' So
highly pleased were they that the
excursionists passed a resolution
of thanks to their
and spoke in very, high terms of
the country inspected. Since the
The other day a merchant saw
m 1 ' m
a larmer receiving, gooas irom
Chicago, says the . Muscotah,,
(Kan.,) Record. The goods!
were in the line and same as - he
had been carrying for years.' He
approached the farmer and said:
"I could have sold you . every
article you have there - for the
same money .that you paid the
Chicago house and saved you the
express besides." .
"Then , why on earth didn't
you say so?" answered the
farmer. "I s have taken the
Muscotah Record for. years,
and have never seen a line about
you -. selling .these . goods. The
Chicago house advertising in the
paper quoted prices oh their goods
askingf oj? my ' trade and; they
got it. Now you have no kick
coming, as I did not know you
had for sale the article I ordered.
I am no mind reader."
visitors f are hard-headed ; scien
tists who are hot given to making
unwarranted statements,. .; their
opinions of the Northwest and its
future in agriculture may be tak
en seriously. These were noth
ing short of glowing. The fer
tile soil, the : favorable climate,
organization and intelligence of
the farmers here and their sue
cessful methods, and rich oppor
. tunity for those who undertake
agriculture in this favored sec
. The comingvisit of the Presi
dent has been the;ause of a new
record being set for Oregon fruit.
Some admirer has purchased two
prize boxes of ' Winter Banana
apples from a Hood River or
chard, paying $25 per box for
them, and - will present them to
the nation's ; executive. As the
apples will run about 32 to the
box,: the buy will spend about 75
cents lor each apple, a price
never , before, so far as known,
paid for ; Oregon apples. ; Of
entertainers fcourse the careful selection and
packing of the fruit for shipment
to: the White House accounts for
a large part of the almost. fal
ulous price. :
President i Taft, who comes to
Portland October 2, has been in
duced to cut out a golf game that
had been planned for him there
and make a public address so that
his admirers here may- have an
opportunity to hear him speak,
It was first arranged to have the
big President kept somewhat in
i
tion ol the country,, all were , a V, c -, " netirp
by a limited number. It now
appears that in addition to mak
ing a public address at the Ar
mory on the afternoon of Oc
tober 2, he will lay the corner
stone of the First Universalist
church on the following day.
Oregon's annual trek to the
hop fields has commenced. Train
after train .is discharging its
human cargoes on both sides
of the Willamette : river. The
youth and beauty of the land go
to the I Oregon ;hop fields1 for
play, but there is a sprinkling of
gray' ' heads ' here and there
Picking hops is neither all -play
nor is it all work. S The:: Septem
ber mornings and sunnyj after
noons bring health and the aroma
rom the hops - induce intense
appetites and sound sleeping. !
The hop fieldsfurnish recrea
tion for thousands who would be
unable to take vacations other
wise. The ' college man goes to
hoplields to make" money,'- the
invalid goes because the , busy-
air of the": camp-; and;;, health
giving surroundings " are better
than any resort of an ' artifical
nature. .:: O,;:.-.
The'Oregon hop picking season
compares with the corn huskings
of the middle west and the maple
sugar camps of New England
except that the . hop picking- is
usually on a larger scale than
the others. It is seldom that
the season begins as early as it
has begun this year. The season
opens usually about September 6.
This year picking began Thurs
day in some yards and will be
general by the latter part of next
week.
When 50 cents a box or $1 per
hundred pounds is paid for pick
ing hops, - the"- average ' picker
can : make . good . wages. : The
ayerage female picker will make
from $2 to $3 a day : and the
average male' picker from '$3 to
$4, while rapid - pickers of
either sex may make from . $5 to
$6 per day. It is not always the
male picker who is the - best, but
he is usually the "steadiest work
er. . The person 'who works in the
hop' fields has a ravenous ap
petite. His diet depends - upon
the enterprise of the meat man
and the baker who comes into
the yard every day selling food.
The odor that comes ' from the
hops produces the ' sharpest ap-
8 "
fair and propose to' make it easy JqW Afooilt
iUl LUC III. -
There will be no charge for
any entry at the fair. Seventy
stalls for stock are now about
finished.'- Competent men to
care for all entries, and the com
fort of visitors have been arrang
ed for, and there is reason to be
lieve that the fair will be one of
tmore genuine pleasure and com-;
fort than any held in this section
heretofore.
Cordial Invitation.
Wallis Nash, who will be re-
I membered as a prominent man
The group by the engine re- at O. A. C. years ago, and as one
presents the Tuesday Afternoon 0f the promoters of the C. & E.,
Reading ; Club, , of Corvallis, extends a cordial welcome to all
boarding the tram at the C. & A. Benton county people and urges
depot for a picnic at the end of that thev attend, especially on
the line. The kodak snap ; shot Benton county day.
by the porter, repor-
That Fall Suit
Come and get a PRINCETON
College Cut Suit. .The latest de
signs in fabrics and styles.
A. K. RUSS
Dealer in all Men's Furnishings
" We sell cheapest because we sell
for cash. . - "
CORVALLIS. - - OREGON
was
ter and official photographer of
the club. " The members present
are: MesdamesM." Jacobs, B,
A. Cathey, Walter Wiles, Rose
Selling,' - Lucy Yates, Isabelle
Horner, Nellie Carver, Margaret
Snell, Josephine Wells, J. .M
Parks and W. G. Davis; Misses
Sarah and Eda 'Jacobs, Pauline
Kline, and Bertha Davis. ;
HELP
YOUR
CHURCH
CHtW
CADILLAC
and
- KING CORN
TOBACCO
Always Good; not made by
the Trust. Sold at -
JACK MILNE'S
By Patronizing Mrs. J. Mason's Spec-
r ial Benefit Millinary Sales. '
' Mrs. J. Mason, the milliner at Third
and Moiiroe streets, is going to donate
ten per cent of her daily sales to the
respective churches in the city, begin
ning Monday, September 20, and giving
the tair there will be a parade o the benefit of tw days' sales to each
scnooi cnnaren ana aqaresses by church.
some of the best speakers of the
state.
Ample Provision Free.
The fair committee has arrang
ed to house, feed and water 2C0
teams free of charge." They want
Dr. VIRGINIA V. LEWEAUX,
Osteopathic Physician
At Corvallis Hotel
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
At Albany
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays:
15-17 Brenner Building
The dates set apart are as follows :
M.. E. church, Souths September 20,
and October 1; baptist, September 21,
and October 2; . Evangelical,,. Septem
ber, 22, and October 3; Presbyterian,
September 23, and October 4; Metho
dist Episcopal, " September, 24, and
the mountain people to visit the
spoken of by the visitors. ; Their
favorable opinion is certain to be
productive of much good for these
men are in touch with large num
bers of farmers who are looking
for : new Y locations, as I well as
thousands of students who are
Studying scientific agriculture
' and who are on the lookout for
good farm lands.
ALASKA AS A HOME.
Alaska, with about one-fifth
the area of the remainder of the
United States, contains less' than
100,000 inhabitants.' That it can
support a population of three to
six millions is an opinion resting
upon facts. . . , ; ;
Sixty miles beyond the arctic
circle the hardier garden -vege
tables, such as potatoes,"" cabbage
and cauliflower, are already raised
successfully. At the farthest
station of the agricultural de
partment more than 500,. miles
north of Sitka barley and bats
. are brought to maturity every
year, and in normal years winter
wheat and rye, spring wheat and
.buckwheat are harvested. The
total Alaska area suitable to cul
tivation is estimated at a hundred
thousand square miles. Finland,
substantially in the same latitude,
and with as cold a climate, has
about 50,000 square miles of cul
tivable area, apd supports a pop-
. Ulation of .3,000,000. It is a fair
argument that Alaska can do at
least half . as well as Finland., Do-
. ing fully, aslwell the territory,
with twice the arable area, would
support 6, 000,000 "people.
$1,500,000 Wool
In This Valley
are respectable people intent up
on earnirig-money to assist in
the winter's expense. V -r"
In the groups of smaller yards,
such as are found in the Pike
valley.'west of North" Yamhill,'
the best and cleanest hop. pick
ing will be found. Each grower
employes from 40 to 60 .pickers
and the season is most enjoyable
there. " ' . -d-
(Continued from page one )
produce the best results. " As a
consequence, r the A output was
larger than it has been in recent'
years and the quality was better.
At the same time . there was a
sharper demand from buyers and
prices were higher.
Comparison By Years
' The total wool clips of Oregon
and their value in the past four
years were as follows:
-v - ' Pounds , - Value
1909..,...........20,450,000 $4,000,000
1908 18,500,000 2,500,000
1907.............. 20,000,000 - 3,800,000
1906......;.;...... 18, 000,000 3.240,000
The quality of the wool was
excellent. - It was of better staple
than last year, though of heavier
shrinkage, owing" to the dry
was 23 cents, rwhich was realized
on a part of one clip at Shaniko.
The larger part of the best grades
sold between 20 and 422 cents
Some scouring wools went at 13
cents,' and other " coarse grades
moved at prices up to 17 cents.
For the clip, as a 1 whole, the av
erage price was about 19 cents,
Boosting for
Lincoln Fair
(Continued fromi page one. )
the prospect is all that could be
1 desired.
- Pioneers and Schools'. "
: One pleasing feature . of the
fair will be an experience meet-
spring. : The average weight of mg neld by tne pioneers of Urn
the fleeces was placed at coin county. Mr. Nash has dis
pounds; the heaviest" average covered twenty-eight who came
ever known in the state. The ' to Lincoln in 1858-60 and these
wool sheared fully one - pound to , have promised to occupy a seat
the fleece more than it did last1 on the platform, Sept. 9,'and give
year.
The highest price paid' during
the -i Seasoir in I- Eastern " Oregon
the people their experience.
p Much is being made of a school
display, and on the 'first" day of
Fall
Bargains
New goods now in for fall
and we offer special induce
ments to early shoppers.
Prices
36-inch half wool dress
goods. All the leading col
ors suitable for school wear
etc.
3y2cYard
Two-Piece
Tailored suits in all sizes
for ladies and misses. Ex
tra values offered now at
Muslin
Of all
pillow
prices
kinds,
tubing,
$25.00
Sheeting,
etc., - at
Very Low
silks
Complete stock of new fall
silks. . Good quality Messa
line, 27 inches wide, all
shades,
$1.00 Yard
Embroidery
Materials of . every kind,
full line of Corticella wash
, embroidery silks, 6 skeins
25 c
Linen
Waists, plain tailored, stiff
collars and cuffs.
$1.50
. We Fit
CORSETS
THE
PISr SHOP
j F. L. MILLER
!, 142 Second Street
October 4; . Congregational, September
25, and October 5; Episcopal, Septem
ber 27, and October, 8; Roman Catho-.
lie, September 28, and October, 9;
Christain, September 29 and October
10; German Lutheran, September 30,
and October ,11.
Members and friends of the ' various
churches are requested to remember
the different dates. A full line of trim
med hats will be all ready for selection
the style being this seasons very latest.'
... ; .. . 8-30, 9-4
FOR RENT, ROOMS,
For Rent Three furnished rooms,
two of them suitable for light house
keeping; all down stairs; outside
rooms. Inquire at
800 Fifth Street
PHOTOGRAPHERS
SECOND
PICKEL'S - STUDIO, 430
. Street Phone 4209.
ATTORNEYS
-- Chas. L. Baker and wife will be
this evening from their vacation.
Campers and visitors at the Yachats
have been much annoyed this season by
the presence of dead sea lions on the
beach. Some of the sports still rinsjsts'
in killing these animals "just for fun.".
If they were used for any" purpose it
would be different but when the carcass'
is left to decay on the: beach we fail
to see wnere tne tun - comes in. it is
true the sea lions destroy a large num
ber of fish but the few that can be
"killed will make very little "difference
in that line. . .
The Crime of Idleness
J. F., YATES, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,,
Office Rooms 3, 4, 1st Natl Bank Bldg.
PHYSICIANS
G. R. PARRA, M. D.r PHYSICIAN AND
Surgeon. Office in Burnett. Block,'. '
' over Harris' Store. Residence' corner
Seventh and Madison. Office hoursr
, 8 to 9 a. m.; 1 to 2 p. m. Phonesr
' Office, 2128, Residence, 404.
J. B. MORRIS, M. D., PHYSICIAN-,
and Surgeon. Corner Third and Mon
j roe Streets, Corvallis, Oregon. Office
- hours: 9 to 12 a. m.; x to 4 p' m.; 7 to.
8 p. m. Phone in both office and resi- -
dence..
Idleness means trouble for anyone.
It's the same : with ' a lazy liver. ' It
causes constipation, headache, jaundice,
sallow complexion, pimples and blotch
es, loss of appetite, nausea, but Dr.
King's New Life Pills soon banish liver
troubles and build up your health. 25c
at-all druggists.
's Academy
Opens Sept. 7th
The Academy of Our Lady of
Perpetual Help will re-open on
September 7th. By means of the
hew addition and the remodeling
of the building the school is now
equipped with - all modern im
provements, and with a corps of
competent teachers may be de
pended upon to do thorough work
both in the grades and high school
course. . ' -. ' -" . -v
- For particulars apply to Sister
Superior, 225 West Ninth St,
Albany, Oregon. 8-19 to 9-19.
W.T. ROWLEY, M. D., PHYSICIAN"
and Surgeon. Special attention given
to the Eye. Nose and Throat. Office
in Johnson Blag. Ind. 'phone at of-
, fice and lesidence. :.
UNDERTAKERS
M. S. BOVEE, FUNERAL DIRECT-"
. or and Licensed Embalm er. Sne
cessor to Bovee & Bsner Corvallis..
TJ T . 1 1 T.I
vregim. iuu. ruuno 5. oeu rnone
241, Lady attendant when desired. '
BLACKLEDGE & EVERETT, .. Li
censed embalmers and funeral direct-.
: ors. Have everything new in coffins,
caskets and burial robes."" Calls ' ans
wered day and night. ' Lady assist
ant. Embalming a specialty., Day
phones, Ind. 117 and 1153, Bell, 531;
night phones, Ind. 212STand 1153.
E. E; WILSON
. Attorney AtJ Law
Zierolf Bldg. Corvalh's, Oregon
Notice
, My wife, Maude Hamlin, having left
my bed and board, without, just cause
or provocation, I hereby forbid any one
trusting her in my name as I shall pay
no debts contracted by ; her after this
date. R. W. Hamlin.
Dated Aug,. 23, 1909,. ; 8-23-30 ,
Succeed when'- evervthinCf else fails.
?n, nervous, prostration and female
weaknesses they are the supreme
remedy, as thousands have testified.
FOR KIDNEY, LIVER AND
STOMACH TROUBLE
it is the best j medicine ever sold
t v iOver a.dmggist'a. counter., ,,
Via
r -
JOSEPH H i WILSON
Attorney at Law
Office: Burnett Building,
Corvallis, Oregoii
Farmers! 'See'" -
S. S. HENKLE A
(Successor to Smith Bros.)
CORVALLIS, OREGON
The Place to Buy Right, Handles-,.
Harness, Saddles, Robes, " Whips
).-' and Gloves
Does Repairing Neatly
1 and Promptly
Flrct rinnr MVf Vi C-r ..4
" A VI BAUCUUO