The daily gazette-times. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) 1909-1921, August 09, 1909, Image 1

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    PRICE FIVE CENTS
JUDGE HOLGATE
THE REAL
PROF. C. I. LEWIS I1AY ACCEPT A CALL
IS AGAINST PAV
ING CITY STREETS
PASSES UP FED
CALLED
PLANTS
TO THE UTAH AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE
L
wunYALua, Dtniun luuni i,UKt.bUN, IY1UNUAI, AUUUS1 J,
BOOSTER
BEYOND
FLOWERS
E
POSH
DEATH OVERTAKES CITIZEN WELL
KNOWN IN BENTON COUNTY.
MS ACTIVE PUBLIC SERVANT
As County Judge Was Responsible for
Erection of this County's Splendid
Court House Funeral Services Will
Occur Tomorrow Morning.
Erastus Holgate, one of the
older and well-known citizens of
Corvallis, died at hishOme in this
city Sunday morning, aged 76
years. The old gentleman had
been failing gradually for some
time, but was able to be about
until quite recently and few had
knowledge of the critical illness
that ended in his death yesterday
morning.
"Judge" Holgate, as he was
familiarly known, was born in the
state of Pennsylvania in April,
1833. While he was yet a boy
bis parents moved to Illinois. In
1852 he arrived in Corvallis, then
Known as Marysviiie, and since
that time has been a. prominent
citizen of this community. For
several years he was engaged in
the mercantile business, but in
, 1874 he began the practice of law
which he followed until recently,
having been at one time a partner
of the late Judge John Burnett.
Back' m the 80s he was county
judge and during his progressive,
businesslike administration Ben
ton county's splendid court house
was erected.
Judge Holgate was highly re
spected by all who knew him.
He was possessed of a Cheerful,
sunny disposition and always had
a smile for everyone he met.
Promptness and honesty char
acterized his business and profes
sional career. He was as regular
as the town clock in going from
his home to his office, and from
his office back for his meals. This
regularity in his habits was of ten
commented upon by his acquaint
ances, and no doubt contributed
much to the physical and mental
. Continued on page two
AND KEEPS HIS PROPERTY
FIRST-CLASS CONDITION.
IN SAINTS MAKE GOOD PROPOSITION TO THE HEAD OF 0. A. C's MAG
NIFICENT DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE.
E. B. HORNING ONE OF THESE OREGON MAN STILL HAS THE fnER UNDER CONSIDERATION
Has Profusion of Flowers on
Property, and Has Long " Made
Flower Bed of His Sidewalk Park
ing. Makes Impression.
His Gazette-Times Man Cites few Reasons Whv Lewis can Better Afford tn Remain
on the Coast Utah School Already Reduce" to Nothingness. and Now in
the Hands of the Pliant Servitors of the Ecclesiastics Who Rule the State--
Field not Large Enough to Interest Man Like Lewis. -
CITIZEN OF CORVALLIS ARGUES
' THEY ARE UNNECESSARY.
FAVORS : REMOVAL OF SHACKS
C V. JOHNSON IN LINE FOR OFFICE
BUT REFUSES.
The best booster is-not neces- Prof c I. Lewis, head of thei
sarily the man .who raises big department of horticulture at O.
publicity funds, talks loudest in A c. has just returned from a
a newspaper or builds a very fine trip into Utah. He looked over
house. A booster of genuine the valleys of the state and can
merit is the one who makes his hardly find words to express his
property, however unpretentious enthusiasm for the land over
it may be, take on a well-kept which the Latter-day Saint has
appearance. When he adds to dominion. He was narticularv
this a few, or many, flowers to enthusiastic over Cache Valley,
make it genuinely attractive to the former stamping ground of
the passerby he is the kind of the editor of this? rwmp.r.- T,ikp
booster of which any town can all other visitors to Logan, Prof,
not have too many. Lewis found the view from tha
take Horningfor instance. No Agricultural College ' absolutely
one would ever accuse the Second incomparable; 1 nothing in the
street groceryman of setting the United States suroasses it-. He
world on fire when it comes to j c. :
. ... . iuuiiu tuts cxuys suueruue, saw
whooping things up in a public- .. A. , ,
ityway, Mr. Horning doesn't scthe ual of a:;Pder the
talk much about boosting and he sun scenic graudeur not surpass-
did not give half a million' to the ed by the" best "of Switzerland's
booster fund, but he has done offerings, and he found people
what countless numbers of men rolling in wealth" despite the fact
m this city have not done-made twe-ty.five years they
an ordinary residence property , , . . . , , .
attractive. The residence at the have been victimized by every
corner of 10th and Washington passing charlatan with worthless
where he lives is not an archi- stock to sell. He found general
tectural beauty, neither is it uri- conditions absolutely 'perfect for
sightly, but about that place is a raising fruit and agreed with the
well-kept lawn and a . profusion writer that with proper care
of flowers of all kinds .kept m Cache Valley can produce fruit
perfect condition. To the north equal to that from the-mostfa-of
the house is a garden but this mous sectiong of the northwest.
is ever m such excellent condi- He also mentioned JBrigham City,
bon that it does not detract, and the Bear River Valley and Provo
even here flowers so intermingle Valey as looking .good t0 him
thatit might well be mistaken and frankly confessed that a
for a flower garden butrfor the sight of the vaney regions of
fact that the corn rises to majes- Utah really indicated au the pos-
f)een distasteful to the Univer
sity of Utah, which in every way
possible has sought to throttle
the school at Logan. For count
less years the University has
sought to absorb that institution,
and the papers of the state the
past ten years are but a record
of -the struggle between the
state's two big schools. At the
present time, the Agricultural
College is shorn of practically all
hut elementary work and js in
the. hands of pliant tools of the
oligarchy which rules all things
spiritual ", and temporal in the
staie oi. utan. unaer sucn con
ditions,, that school cannot ful
fil, a splendid mission, and under
such conditions would - Prof.'
Lejwis have to work should he go
tbfcre;V Doubtlessly he would be
accorded every courtesy ..'.perhaps
givten an increasing ' salarv?
and his ability would command
consideration- and respect, but
just as certain as his, name is
Lewis would the combination that
dominates Utah .make him serve
its personal ends, or find, sooner
or later, one of their own number
to take his place.
The Northwest offers a far
greater field for Prof. Lewis and
Says Streets are Solid and That Large
Loads can be ! Hauled Over Them
With Ease Says Towns are Trying
to Follow City Fashions.,
Editok; Gazette-Times: I . have
read the views of prominent citizens
regarding proposed improvements in
CorvaHis, and while not presuming to
include myself in the same class, I
hope -. you 'will allow me to say that,;
while agreeing fully with the views ex
pressed;, about 'sidewalks, sewers and
the dynamiting of old shacks, it seems
to me that the streets of Corvallis are
not in such-bad condi tioir as toV make
paving a necessity, .y s v . ...
The business streets, especially such
of them as would brf,Jjaed. -are already
so. welV-graveled and smooth and solid'
that the heaviest load .ean be , hauled
ovef. -them either in winter or s3mmer
as.easily A as; over' 'stone' pavement.
Wfaatftea,iftl'.tli.ll8e'l!:..gmIg to 'the
very, considerable expense ol paving
themr; :Smce the pavement would have
to be sprinkled nd cleaned just the
same" as now, ; would it not really be
more ornamental than useful just like
a thirtyjldoflattispjing hat "that has to
be bought-so" iis tcrTad iff. thef Avail
ing fashion, when, in the eyes of all
sensible persons, a five dollar hat would
do just as well, or even better, all
things considered?
Pavements are necessary in large
cities in order to permit the amount of
traffic which is there carried on. But
it has become stylish now for smaller
towns, which have no traffic demand
ing such improvements, to ape their
more aristocratic sisters and, though
already heavily in debt, borrow still
NO SAURY AND. NO GRAFT
Local Man "Thought He Wanted Posi
' tion and then Thought He Didn't"
Toggery and Council Take all Time,
at His Disposal.
Continued on page two
C. V. Johnson,, of this '; city
will not be census supervisor for
the First -Congressional district
of Oregon, Robert J. Hendricks
of Salem, having just been ap
pointed to that position. Some
time ago, Mr. Johnson had a
sort of hazy idea that he would
like this particular job and as he
is Congressman Hawley's -chief
cook and bottle washer in this
distnct, ne coma - nave naa .the
ppsition,? but ,, investigation T re
vealed the fact that the salary is '
not , sufiicienfc ' to , make1 the
' 'honor' ' worth while. And as
there's no chance to graft the
job was passed. Mr; JohnsQn
as head of The Toggery, and a
councilman of this rapidly grow
ing city with a multitude of'
civic troubles,- has -a terrific lot
of "Business on hands, and he
likes to work, so the census
job with its lack of work and
salary failed to get him-a fact
Corvallis people will be glad to
note. Corvallis doesn't want to
lose any of its Johnsons, even for
a little while.
Continued on page two
Wm. M. Kline, who lives on part of
the Whiteside place, sold three dairy
cows at private sale Saturday, re
ceiving $155 therefor. That's a pretty
fair price.
tic heights. The glory of the
sibilities of the promised land,
i i .".""
uowever, comes in i.neiav- which it g0 perfectly resembles
iau uurui uecurauuna uulS1ue me topographically.
xeiiue. rur twu years or more mi ,-i
, , , iuc yuuik. ui yaiutuicu uitcicot
Mr Horning has Jiad cement to 0regon people is that Prof,
walk past his property and a six hag been offered WQrk at
iooi parsing Dounaea Dy a ce
Palace Theater
Monday and Tuesday
All Motion
Picture Program
KALEM FILMS
"The Escape From
Andersonville"
Ihis is an exact reproduction ot one
of the most thrilling incidents of the
Civil War, showing: the interior of the
famous old prison pen, the digging of
the tunnel, the escape and desperate
night and final home coming of the sur
vivors. It is a great theme . and mag
'. xrificently handled. , '
"A Priast ofthe Wilderness"
' . . r . . . .....
' A great historic picture "portraying
x atner Jogue s adventurous miesionto
the Iroquois Indians in the Sixteenth
century.
"MadN Gras In Havana"
A stunning panorama of the great
Cuban pageant as it was celebrated
this year, f :
. Friday and Saturday
' " Ten Nght8 In a Barroom"
ment euro, mis parking, in
stead of being left to a growth
of weeds, is set to flowers a dis
tance of 150 feet In the spring,
pansies in riotous profusion blos-
the Agricultural College of Utah
at a salary considerably in ad
vance of what he receives here.
Prof. Lewis is recognized as a
man of genuine ability, with a
reputation on the coast as an ex-
som there to the delight of every - w OYPo11o(1 uv nnryQ
passerby, and at the present Utah needs him and wants him,
time six rows of van-colored but it is hardly possible that for
asters are planted there. . The eyen a larger salary at the pres
wnter sawthisasterbedm bloom ent time Prof. Lewis will enter
last fall, and at the Seattle fair tain the idea of leaying the WQn.
saw no norai oispiay oi tne same derf ul field the Northwest offers.
Utah is a small state, numerical-
extent that surpassed it - This
fall the Horning parking wjll
again be a gorgeous mass of
beautiful, aster blossoms, suffi
ciently conspicuous to attract
countless numbers of passengers
from the Union Station. Being
ly, the Agricultural College has
but few more than half the num
ber of students at 0. A. C,
and appropriations for mainte
nance are increasingly smaller.
We announce the first showing of Fall,
1909, Ladies' Suits
LaVOGUt
B
RAND
TTtari has nrwsihilitf pa nHnnlnf-eilv
near tne station, tne liormng w ;u:i::
Visivo ViAAn "hTTATfa qIwsvq onrl TTfciTi
and floral beauty has helped many ha3 not kept -p the proces
a waiuiig paS8exiBi: tu wuixe gi()n for reasons.that known
away idle moments and given L mjarv n w ki
. X. v j uiuu Tinw aaci3 iiyu .tu
many a stranger a jjwasaui TT, . rt . raoA
Zion." Those same conditions
thought
The Gazette-Times feels that
Mr. Horning is a booster worth
while. He put down his cement
walk before he had to, and even
yet he has no cement approach
Continued on page two".
will ever keep Utah in the "rear.
The Agricultural College, a gov
ernment school with a tendency
to growth, has been and is a thorn
in the side, of r the , non-progressives
represented by ecclesiasti
cism, and its growth has ever
You can secure the newest designs of
the foremost style creators The new
est and freshest fashions that are of -fered
anywhere. You will find them
remarkably moderate in price.
SEE WINDOW DISPLAY
STANDARD
PATTERNS
t
NEMO
CORSETS