Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, October 15, 1980, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Emerald
Vol. 82 No. 30
>
Eugene, Oregon 97403
Wednesday, October 15,1980
Rosalyn defends Carter presidency
Rosalyn Carter
T
First Lady uses Eugene stop
to hit Reagan stance on elderly
By RICH BRUER
Of th* Emerald
Affirming her husband Jimmy’s sup
port of the elderly and taking a few
swipes at Ronald Reagan and the media,
first lady Rosalyn Carter made a whirl
wind visit to Eugene Tuesday.
Speaking at the Celeste Campbell
Center, Rosalyn Carter contrasted Pres.
Carter's views on the elderly with those
of Ronald Reagan, ‘whose words and
actions go against the needs of the el
derly.”
Carter told the crowd of 400,
predominantly senior citizens, that un
like her husband, Reagan opposes the
Social Security system. Pres. Carter is
determined to assure that Social Securi
ty continues to meet the needs of the
elderly and promises further cost of living
increases in social security payments,
she said.
Pres. Carter has proposed a national
health care plan that includes more help
for the elderly, but Reagan opposes such
a plan, Carter said, adding that Reagan
has said “There’s no health crisis in
America.”
Income from the Windfall Profits Tax
proposed by Pres. Carter in the spring of
1979 and passed by Congress last winter
will help the elderly pay their fuel bills this
winter, she said.
Carter was deliberate in enumerating
her husband's accomplishments in the
White House, such as his energy policy
— something she said did not exist
before he took office.
When questioned during a news con
ference about the negative nature of the
campaign, she placed the blame on the
media because they have taken Pres.
Carter’s statements out of context.
"Every time Jimmy goes out, he talks
about his record and his plans for the
future, but what you hear is one sta
tement taken out of context."
She criticized Reagan for refusing to
debate Pres. Carter. Her husband wants
to debate Reagan "to get the issues
before the people because that's what
the people want to hear.”
During both her address before the
senior citizens and the news conference,
Carter stressed the "stark difference"
between her husband and Reagan
"The election this year is very, very
important. The choice (the voters) make
can affect our future for years to come."
The choice this year is greater than in
1976 when Gerald Ford was the Repub
lican nominee because Ford represent
ed the moderate Republicans, while
Reagan represents the right-wing
Republicans, she said
Carter predicted victory for Pres.
Carter in Oregon this year She said he
lost to Ford by only about 1500 votes in
1976, but Eugene McCarthy received
some 50,000 state votes that year.
This year Oregon voters will not vote
for a candidate like McCarthy but will
cast their vote for Pres. Carter, she said
Although there has been widespread
speculation that Pres. Carter would ap
point a woman to the Supreme Court if
elected to another term, she said without
hesitation, “He will appoint a woman to
the Supreme Court."
Police refuse to finger Brooks in scandal
By BILL MANNY
and RICHARD WAGONER
Ol th* Emerald
Eugene Police Chief James Packard said Tues
day he wouldn't “confirm or deny” that University
football coach Rich Brooks is the athletic department
member who was aware of alleged sex offenses by
University football players.
Packard said in a statement Sunday that a
member of the athletic department was aware of
alleged assaults, but failed to report them to authori
ties.
The Emerald reported in August that two University
women had informed Brooks more than a year ago of
alleged sexual assaults by reserve quarterback An
drew Page, and asked Brooks to take appropriate
action.
In a statement published by the Eugene Regis
ter-Guard Sunday, Packard said "I will never under
stand why a member of the University of Oregon
Athletic Department, when he became aware of the
alleged sex offenses, felt no moral or ethical obligation
to inform any law enforcement agency nor to encour
age the alleged vitcims to do so.”
Had the alleged sex offenses been reported,
Packard continued, additional offenses “might well
have been prevented."
Withholding such evidence is not illegal, Packard
said. "There's no criminal statute covering it I know
of.”
Packard indicated he wouldn't release the athle
tic department member's identity because of the
current investigation.
Since the investigation began, Page, along with
Dwight Robertson, Rick Ward and Reggie Young,
have been indicted by a Lane County grand jury on
sodomy charges.
Page and Young have transferred to the Univer
sity of Hawaii, and Ward is attending the University of
Colorado. Robertson is a tailback for the University
football team.
The statement was made in an effort to “dispel
misstatements in the community and in the press” that
Eugene police mishandled a 10-month investigation
that has led to 17 indictments against althletes and
former University coaches on various charges, Pack
ard said.
He felt his published statement had explained that
all alleged crimes would be pursued equally, regard
less of who is involved.
“I think it certainly left little question in most
people’s minds.”
University officials are expected to respond today
to Packard’s statement and District Attorney Pat
Horton’s charges that University administration of
ficials have not fully cooperated with investigators.
In his Sunday statement, Packard said that
University assistance in the investigation “was almost
non-existent."
Tuesday, he added, "that’s not fair to some
people. Certainly (former) President (William) Boyd,
(Harry) Cronan, (W.N.) McLaughlin, Greg Robinson,
were all very helpful. And there were a few more I can't
identify at this point.”