Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, May 14, 1980, Page 8, Image 8

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    MOVING SOON?
MOVE IT YOURSELF & SAVE 50%
Dependable Trucks & Trailers
Low Rates
LOCAL & ONE WAY
Reservations Now Guarantee
Rates & Equipment
TRUCK
RENTAL
345-2353
10% Discount with copy of this ad
A Keepsake diamond engagement ring is
the perfect way to show your love.
Keepsake guarantees each center diamond
for fine white color, perfect clarity and correct
modern cut.
Keepsake. When it's for keeps.
Priced from $250 - $3,000
FINE JEWELRY
WATCHES & GIFTS
Student Accounts
Welcome
VALLEY RIVER CENTER
484-1303
Daily 10.00-9 Sat 10:00-6 Sun 1100-6
Keepsake
Registered Diamond Rings
'OoftA jewelers
Keepsake Comer
juiwl
Cultural Forum
May 16, 17, 18, 1980
University of Oregon, Eugene
All events FREE
East Lawn of EMU (rain site: EMU Ballroom)
FRIDAY, MAY 16
12:00
12:35
1:20
1:55
2:40
3:15
3:50
4:15
4:50
5:35
Random Sample
Butler (Ireen B.ind
Joe Kasik and John
Hicks
Northern Broad
casters
Asha Alec Slater
Blues Delux
Jim Guthrie
|udy Scher and
Charles Kimmel
Boden and Zanetto
JOHN IACKS0N
2:05
2:50
3:35
4:20
5:00
Larry Hanks
Back in the Saddle
In Cahoots
Mark Nelson
Metropolitan |ug
Band
WORKSHOPS:
• John Jackson workshop
following his p rfo-mance.
EMU Forum Room
SPECIAL EVENT:
John Jackson will perform at
the fountain on the Eugene
downtown mall at 1:30 pm.
SATURDAY, MAY 17
12:00 The Rainy Day Band
12:45 Dennis Ramsey
1:20 Roger and Janice
Maddy
CHILDREN'S MUSIC
1:00 Clyde A Susan Curley
1:30 Percy Hilo
3:00 Concerts for SmALL
People
In the grass amphitheater,
.northwest side of EMU
WORKSHOPS:
• Irish-American Music
(with In Cahoots) 11:30 am
EMU Forum Room
• Northwest Folk Songs
(Linda Allen and the Rainy
Day Band) 1:00 pm EMU
Forum Rm
• Songs of the West (Larry
Hanks) 4:00 pm EMU Forum
Rm
SQUARE DANCE Sandy
Bradley calling. Northern
Broadcasters playing music.
also Marysville Cloggers
demo performance. EMU
Ballroom, 8 pm
SUNDAY, MAY 18
12:00 Sacred Harp Singers
12:35 John Michael Lee
1:10 Big Chicken String
Band
1:45 Meryle Korn
2:20 Greg Field
2:55 Proctor. Southwell.
and Charette
3:30 Duck Soup
4:05 Hobe Kytr and Dave
Berge
4:40 Ana Green
5:15 Ragtime Millionaires
WORKSHOPS:
• Mountain Dulcimer (Mark
Nelson, national dulcimer
champion) 11:30 am Bring
your dulcimer or just your
interest. EMU Forum Rm.
• Contra Dance (David
Reich) 1:30 pm. EMU Ball
room
• Sea Shanty Singing (Bob
Choderker), 3 00 pm EMU
Forum Rm.
Ballot Measure 3
Energy loans scrutinized
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
are explanations of measures 3
and 4 on the May 20 primary
ballot. Other measures will ap
pear later this week.
If Ballot Measure 3 is passed,
it would amend the state consti
tution and authorize the Small
Scale Local Energy Project
Program.
The program would make
loans for renewable resource
projects that would by law in
clude solar, wind, geothermal,
biomass, water resources and
cogeneration.
The loans would have to be
backed with mortgages or other
security before payments could
be made. If a project failed, the
obligation to pay back the
bonds would fall on taxpayers.
The newly formed loan pool
would be funded through the
sale of general obligation
bonds. The bonds could be is
sued for up to one-half percent
of the value of the taxable
property in Oregon. Currently,
the state could issue bonds for
up to $295.1 million to provide
for the loan pool.
Those eligible for the loans
would include, under chapter
672, Oregon Laws 2979, “in
dividuals, small businesses
(defined as those employing
fewer than 100 persons and be
ing either a partnership, cor
poration, cooperative or sole
proprietorship), non-profit cor
porations, cooperatives or a
municipal corporation, such as
a city." -
The state department of en
ergy would work in conjunction
with a citizens’ advisory com
mittee in making loan decisions.
Passage of this measure
would authorize "ad valorem
taxes" that could be "levied
annually upon all the taxable
property in the state of Oregon
in sufficient amount to provide
for the payment of principal and
interest of the bonds issued.”
Or the Legislature could
"provide other revenues to
supplement or replace the
bonds, in whole or in part, such
as tax levies."
Critics of the measure con
tend it provides too little for
renewable resource projects,
and that the DOE would be too
governor-influenced.
Other critics are worried that
Oregon could overextend itself
into the general obligation bond
market and harm its double- and
triple-A bond rating. A triple-A
bond rating is the best rating a
state can have and provides for
the sale of general obligation
bonds at the lowest interest
rates.
Currently, general obligation
bonds sell for about 9 percent
interest, according to Oregon
investors.
While investor-owned utilities
such as Pacific Power & Light
have waged a number of battles
and spoken out against an ini
tiative petition drive to put the
1980 Renewable Energy
Development and Conservation
Act on the November ballot,
these same utilities have not
aimed their attacks at Ballot
Measure 3 with the same inten
sity.
Ballot Measure 4
Voters eye vets’ benefits
Ballot measure 4 has one
purpose: to equalize veterans’
loan benefits.
The question the measure
poses is, "Shall home and farm
loan eligibility requirements be
made the same for all
veterans?”
Present Oregon law organ
izes veterans into three groups
that correspond roughly to the
three major conflicts in which
the United States has been en
gaged between 1940 and 1976.
World War II veterans have one
set of standards. Another
group, Korean conflict veter
ans, has its standard of eligibili
ty, and Vietnam veterans are
subject to a third set of criteria.
Measure 4 would provide a
standard set of eligibility requir
CASH
For Textbooks
Mon.-Fri.
Smith Family
Bookstore
768 E. 13th
1 Bl. From Campus
Ph. 345-1651
ements for veterans who served
in the military between Sept. 15,
1940, and Dec. 31,1976.
Veterans would be eligible for
loans if they have at least 210
days of active, honorable ser
vice. A veterans’ loan eligibility
would extend 30 years after his
service discharge, or until July
31, 1985, whichever comes
later.
If the measure is passed,
World War II veterans, whose
loan eligibility ended last Jan
uary, would be reinstated until
the 1985 deadline.
The measure would require
men and women who have
served in the military to live in
Oregon for five years to be
eligible for loans.
In addition, Measure 4 would
for the first time provide farm
and home loans to 165,000 ve
terans not eligible for loans for
JOHN
STEWART
new energy for
EWEB
Pd John Stewart
one reason or another, includ
ing veterans who served
between 1947 and 1950; they
were previously ineligible for
home and farm loans.
The veterans’ farm and home
loan program uses no state or
federal tax money and is a self
supporting program that sup
plies loans at 5.9 percent inter
est. Backers of Measure 4 say
its passage will spur a new wave
of home building and buying in
the state, helping sellers,
builders, suppliers and con
struction workers.
About $22 million will be put
back into the Oregon economy
if the measure is passed, ac
cording to sources in the state
veterans’ affairs department.
Measure 4 does not change
the benefits veterans would
receive, and no objections to
the proposed ballot measure
were filed with the Oregon
Secretary of State's Office.
Critics say Measure 4 has one
basic fault — it does not open
the state loan program to
recently discharged veterans
and to military personnel cur
rently on active duty.
rl
Re-elect CAMILLA PRATT
to EWEB
CAMILLA PRATT supports energy conservation and
development of renewable energy sources • opposes
further nuclear power development • supports the public
power movement • opposes the Regional Energy Bill •
believes all EWEB operations should be environmentally •
sound • welcomes citizen input.
Endorsed by the Oregon League of Environmental Voters
Committee to Re-elect Camilla Pratt to EWEB, Huil-ert Paul, treasurer, 4390 Pearl Street, Eugene