Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, September 29, 1975, Page 11, Image 11

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    Oregon student lobbyists 'keeping afloat'
By KATHY CRAFT
Of the Emerald
"To many people, students are
second class citizens — half
adults with half-rights."
So says Kirby Garrett,
Associated Oregon Student
Lobby (AOSL) board chairman.
"Eliminating that attitude," he
explains, is one of the most
difficult tasks confronting his
organization.
But Garrett, who also serves as
ASUO vice-president, is quick to
point out that since the AOSL's
official birth last February it has
succeeded in scoring several
important victories for students
despite tough roadblocks.
Undoubtedly the most
significant victory was the
passage of House Bill 3043 into
law this summer which
guarantees students a role in
collective bargaining salary talks
at state colleges and universities.
Also important, in Garrett's
opinion, was the addition of an
amendment to Senate Bill 413,
which assured the anonymity of
student course and teacher
evaluations. And, according to
r
'Boob tube' goes to school
with Campus on the Air
Although "educational television" may sound
like a contradiction of terms, the Oregon
Educational and Public Broadcasting Service
(OEPBS) once again is offering a series of college
credit classes which, hopefuly, will change the
"boob" image of the tube.
This fall, OEPBS is offering eight courses
through its Campus on the Air series. Totaling 20
hours of college-level credit, the courses cover
topics as diverse as "Classic Theater" and
"Radical America: The Continuing Revolution,"
which will be offered through the University.
Those enrolling in the courses are as diverse as
the courses themselves. John Ripper, who is
coordinating the programs, says he expects
students to range from community residents
who, for one reason or another, cannot afford to
attend regular classes, or who don't have the
time, to regular college students who might want
to pick up some extra hours at home, far from the
madding crowd.
Most of the television courses are held once a
week, but are aired several times to allow
flexibility in student scheduling. Also, Ripper said,
the first week's programs, beginning Sept 22, will
be re-run Airing the following week for students
who missed them.
This is the tenth year for Campus on the Air, a
few
program which last year attracted some 2,000
students.
Ripper said he expects about the same number
of people to enroll in the program this year, with
the average class size being somewhere in the
neighborhood of 50 to 60 students. But even if
400 people sign up for a class, which Ripper says
is the most they've ever had, it won't make much
difference since it's unlikely classmates will ever
meet each other.
Also, while television is geared for a mass
audience and may seem somewhat impersonal,
there is a flesh and blood human at the other end
of the tubes and wires who corrects all the
assignments, the usual final exam and who is
available for questioning by class members. The
instructor can usually be contacted through the
institution sponsoring the class.
Tuition for the program is $45.00 for three
credit courses and $30.00 for two-credit courses.
Upon completion of the course, the grades and
credits are treated as transfer hours at the state's
higher education institutions.
To register and receive a copy of the course,
prospective students should write to Campus on
the Air, P.O. Box 1097, Dept UO, Portland,
Oregon 97207. Students can register until the
fourth week of classes.
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Caarrett, if the AOSL had not
lobbied the State Board of
Education, the recent tuition
increases at state universities and
colleges would have been even
higher.
All seven of Oregon's state
supported four-year institutions
are a part of the AOSL:UO, OSU,
Portland State, Oregon Institute
of Technology, Oregon College of
Education, Southern Oregon
State College and Eastern Oregon
State College. The governing
board of the lobby is composed of
the student body presidents, or,
as in the case of Garrett, the
president's appointed delegate
from each of the member in
stitutions.
Funding is obtained through a
portion of the incidental fees
collected at the institutions —
currently 36 cents per student.
Future projects, according to
Garrett, include efforts to obtain
further student involvement in the
collective bargaining process,
attempts to redefine and
restructure the incidental fees at
member institutions, and com
piling a voters' guide to direct the
student as consumer. The
organization also will lobby
against a recent ruling by the state
Child Services Division which
excludes the children of students
from state daycare services.
The group's most important
goal, however, and the one on
which all others depend Garrett
explains, is simply "keeping the
organization afloat, respected,
tight and doing good work."
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