Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, October 11, 1949, Page 7, Image 7

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    Finnish Lass Discovers Scenic Beauty
In Western Oregon Hiking Outing
"Seeing Crater Lake made me
realize that ”ve come to one of the
most beautiful states in the U. S„”
commented Gisela Schmidt, a grad
uate student from Finland, who
prefers hiking to other methods of
seeing the country.
About a week ago, she went on a
17-mile hike up in the McKenzie
Pass. “I was quite speechless,” she
lates. “It was just wonderful, such
spectacular scenery.” Miss Schmidt
was not only speechless, but sun
burned when she returned from the
expedition.
“I would like to see more of the
coast,” she continued. "I was very
much impressed by it although it
was raining the day we went down.
And I would love to see California,
to see how oranges grow.”
LANGUAGES HER INTEREST
Miss Schmidt, who has been in
terested in different languages for
as long as she can remember,
speaks five of them, and “used to
speak a little Russian.” In addition
to her native Finnish, and English,
which she speaks fluently, she
knows French, German, and Swed
ish.
Chances to use her English in
public have offered themselves with
amazing frequency. Various orga
nizations have asked the tall, strik
ing blonde to tell them about her
homeland, and another call to en
gage her for a speech interrupted
interview. “Speeches, always
speeches,” she sighed. “It’s wonder
ful that people are so interested in
Finland, but I get so nervous!”
U. S. INFORMAL
“It’s so much easier to get ac
quainted with people here,” said
Miss Schmidt, pointing out of the
major differences between her
country and the United States. “It’s
so informal. You needn’t bother
about their titles, just call every
body by his Christian name. I didn’t
know any Americans before I came
over, but now I feel that I have
many friends.”
After the Oregon-Idaho football
game, she decided that “the most
fun was watching the people.”
Compared to the United States,
Finland is an austere country, she
feels. “You Americans are more in
trospective, laugh more, and you
use so much more color.”
CLOTHES EXPENSIVE
“I am amazed that you can get
all this cloth. One can just go into
a shop and buy it, although every
thing is so expensive, especially the
shoes,” she explained.
The education system is very dif
ferent in Finnish and American uni
versities. A student at the Univer
sity of Helsinki studies until he
feels that he is prepared, and then
asks the professor to give him an
examination. “Here it seems so
much more like school,” claims Miss
Schmidt. “I love my classes, and en
joy the lectures very much.”
At the University of Helsinki, her
major subject was English philol
ogy, and her minors (two required
in Finland) were German philology
and the history of art. Here, going
more extensively into English liter
ature, her courses include 18th cen
tury literature, romantic poets,
problems and methods of literary
criticism, and her thesis.
AMAZED AT SOCIAL LIFE
Astonished at the emphasis on
social life, she exclaimed, “I won
der when people have time to study,
being heads of committees and so
on all the time. I think they must
be geniuses, all of them. I admire
them more for that than for any
thing else—to be able to plan their
time.”
Having received her scholarship
from the Institute of International
Education, Miss Schmidt is spon
sored here by the Wesley Founda
tion and is living at University
House. Dave and Gloria Seaman, di
rectors of Wesley Foundation with
whom she stayed before school
started, really made her feel at
home in Eugene, she stated.
Librarian Plans
Disc Concerts
Students with record collections
who would like to give recorded
concerts should contact Miss Ber
nice Rise, head of the circulation
department and readers’ consult
and at the library, as soon as pos
sible, Miss Rise announced.
The concerts are planned as part
of the program for the Ethel R.
Sawyer browsing room hour held
every Tuesday afternoon at 4. First
of the series is tentatively set for
Oct. 18, Miss Rise said.
The browsing room programs
have been very popular in the past,
Miss Rise pointed out. They will
consist of readings and book re
views by outstanding faculty mem
bers and scenes from plays by the
dramatics department in addition
to the musical programs.
Miss Rise is working on the pro
gram now. A schedule will be an
nounced as soon as it is definite.
Men’s coats without pockets
really are handy. You can throw
all the odds and ends and stuff
away in the first place.
KEEP THIS UNDER
YOUR HAT
EMERALD
CLASSIFIEDS
GET RESULTS
Cops to Invade
U. O. Monday
For Schooling
New police officers will receive
basic training in Eugene Oct. 17
to 21 as part of a state-wide pro
gram.
A week’s program for recent
criminal deputy recruits and other
officers never attending a basic
training school is now under way
at Ashland, and will be continued
each succeeding week at Eugene,
Salem, and La Grande.
Sponsored by the Oregon Asso
ciation of City Police Officers and
the Oregon State Sheriff’s Associa
tion, classes include information
on how far the law permits offi
cers to go in taking actions such
as arrests, investigations, or inter
rogations, the police service, patrol
techniques, and traffice enforce
ment.
The Eugene school will be held
in the Guild Theater in Johnson
Hall, with between 30 and 40 stu
dents expected. This basic train
ing program was started 12 years
ago, but was discontinued during
the war. It was last held on the
campus two years ago.
Cooperating with the program
are the Federal Bureau of Investi-i
gation, the Department of State
Police, the Department of Voca
tional Education, State Board of
Education, and the Bureau of Mu
nicipal Research and Service at the
University of Oregon.
28 Rounds BOXING 28 Rounds
WED., OCT. 12, 8:30—EUGENE ARMORY
GREATEST FIGHT OF THE FALL SEASON
10 ROUNDS.
DAVEY BALL vs. PAUL KENNEDY
100 Bakersfield 158 Long view, Wash.
BOTH SALEM and PORTLAND WERE AFTER THIS
GREAT RE-MATCH. WE GOT IT FOR EUGENE.
4 Good Prelims featuring three local boys
RINGSIDE—$2.50 GENERAL^-$1.50
DO YOU MAMBO?
Why not come in and let Jacklyn’s Competent
Teachers teach you the new Mambo and all the latest
dances?
No Charge for Guest Lesson and Dance Analysis
RHUMBA
SAMBA
TANGO
FOX TROT
WALTZ
SWING
MAMBA
Also
TAP and BALLET
Hours—Mon. thru Fri.—10:00 A. M.—10:00 P. M.
SAT.—10:00 A. M.—6:00 P. M.
flackLftt'i. Dance Studio
24 W. 7th Ave.
Phone 4-5621
ISA to Sponsor
Student Mixer
The Independent Students’ As
sociation is sponsoring a mixer this
Saturday night from 9 to 12 in
Gerlinger Annex. Admission is 50
cents, the price of an ISA member
ship card, which admits its holder
to all ISA social events of the com
ing year.
Membership cards will be sold all
this week on campus, so students
do not have to be at the dance to
get them. At least five other dan
ces are planned by the ISA for the
rest of the year, not including the
spring term Sweetheart formal for
which admission will be charged.
Holders of ISA membership
cards will be designated “partici
pating members” since all non
Greek students are automatically
members of the Independents.
A college professor says some
modern girls are lige cave women.
Aw, don't judge 'em by their
Young Republicans
Attend Conference
YOUNG REPUBLI . R .
Anita Holmes, junior in journal
ism, and William Merriam, Wil
lamette University student and
Oregon director of the Young Re
publican college program, fonfer
red with John Tope, national chair
man of the Young Republican Fed
eration last week-end at the reg
ional conference in Cour d’ Alene,
Idaho .They discussed the college
program and possibilities offered
college students through the cam
pus organization.
Students Requested
To Claim Lost Mail
The Office of Student Affairs is
sued a plea Monday for all students
who think they might possibly
have mail waiting for them at Em
erald Hall to pick it up.
A large quantity of unclaimed
mail is stored in Emerald Hall at
present.
Tonight!
J here will be a meeting’ for
All Campus students and
I'acuity members who are:
MASTER MASONS
7 P. M.
3rd. floor, Gerlinger Hall
SALE
Book Matches
Box of 25 Kingsize — 25c. In glossy
black gift boxes. Colors: yellow,
white, orange and black.
Cello-drums —$1.00. Colors: Black
red, blue, yellow and white.
Cello-squares — 75c. 80 matches per
box. Colors: yellow, red, blue and
white.
Cocktail sets packed in Cello squares,
36 matches, 25 napkins. 65c.
Lipstick tissue. 17 packages per box.
Cello box with blue and white trim
-50c.
Cocktail sets. 38 book matches, 25
napkins, and 25 coasters. Cello
boxed. 70c per set.
Any of the above sets may be rnonogrammed
at a slight additional charge.
U of O Co-op Store
Chapman Hall