Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, November 30, 1948, Page 8, Image 8

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    Waterfront
Blast Hits
Portland
PORTLAND, Ore., Nov. 29—
(AP) — A waterfront explosion
rocfced a wide area of the city to
night but a fire that broke out in
a municipal terminal building and
piled lumber was soon under con
trol.
One man was blown 200 feet into
the street from the Portland dock
commission office where the blast
originated.
Firemen on the scene said Wal
ter Kratt reported he stepped into
the dock commission office, smelled
gas and flipped on an nelectric
light. The explosion followed.
Kratt was flung 200 feet by the
explosion and was taken to a hos
pital. His injuries were not known.
He is an engineer employed by the
commission.
Firemen reported the center of
the three story frame building was
demolished by the explosion and
that windows in scores of nearby
buildings were shattered.
The blast occurred at about 8:15
p.m.
Four freighters tied up at the
municipal owned terminal were not
in danger, according to harbor pa
trolmen.
The ships were berthed at sev
eral hundred yards distance along
the waterfront installation.
Large piles of lumber adjoining
the office structure caught fire.
Firemen said warehouse and dock
units were believed out of danger.
Captain Daniel J. McGarity,
port director, said there was no
gas in the building. He says that
he can only assume that there was
some seepage from a nearby main
He said there are some flame
flickers along the railroad tracks
adjoining the commission dock
property. This would indicate, he
said that the gas mains were seep
ing.
The area was roped off to pre
vent any subsequent explosion if
gas was leaking from these mains.
Reporters at the scene said the
side of the building facing front
street was broken into splinters.
Sponsor in Hospital
John A. Malik, sponsor of Stan
Ray hall, has been forced to take a
leave of absence because of illness.
He is confined in the Veterans’ hos
pital, Portland.
Scout Predicts Aerial
Fray in Cotton Bowl
From all appearances it will be
aerial warfare when Oregon’s
Norm Van Brocklin meets SMU’s
star passers in the Cotton Bowl
New Year’s day, according to
Head Scout Frank Zazula.
Zazula was interviewed on the
Skiing Safety
Movie Topic
Emphasis on skiing safety will
keynote a Red Cross show in Room
101, physical education building, at
7:30 tonight.
Dick Portwood, ski accident pre
vention chairman of the campus
Red Cross, announced yesterday
that three films will be presented.
The movies: “Ski Patrol”, “Ski
Chase”, and “Ski Revels”, will be
shown at 7:30 p. m. and again at
9 p. m.
Mr. George Korn of Eugene, reg
ional director o fthe national ski pa
trol system and a member of the
Willamette ski patrol, will speak
on the ski patrol and ski accident
prevention. He will exhibit so?W3
of the types of safety equipment
used by the ski patrol.
Today's Vanishing
(Continued from page one)
you could say of a man was, he
ain’t worth a plugged nickel.”
And today? It won’t even buy
the foam on a glass of beer. The
only cigar it'll fetch is a skinny
thing that looks like a cigaret with
jaundice and evaporates in three
strong puffs. It won't let you in
to see a newsreel, let alone a dou
ble feature.
In many cities you have to team
it up with some pennies to ride a
bus or buy a newspaper, a pack of
gum, or a bottle of soft drink, jun
ior size. And the glass bottle is so
thick the soda pop looks like the
fluid in a thermometer.
The Democrats used to holler be
cause the Republicans put Andrew
Jackson’s picture on the $20 bill.
They complained they were so poor
they never got to see this picture
of their hero. Now the Democrats
are wondering if they haven t
slighted the memory of Thomas
Jefferson by putting his profile on
a nickel.
The blamed thing is plumb bent
out of value. Today nobody would
take the trouble of plugging a
nickel.
CHRISTMAS
CARDS
Best Wishes For a
Choose to-day from our
tremendous selection of
beautiful Christmas cards.
Religious, senti m e n t a 1,
traditional, h u m o r o u s
cards in all price ranges.
Come in today and select
while our collection is full
and complete. Have your
cards personalized.
MERRY
f
CHRISTMAS
IJ of O fCo=op’
radio program Webfoot Huddle
Time” last night by Harry Sack
ett. He scouted the SMU-TCU
game Saturday.
He compared the annual SMU
TCU rivalry to that between Ore
gon and Oregon State in which
anything can and does happen.
Both teams concentrated on pass
ing and SMU threw the ball 34
times for 18 completions. The game
ended in a 7-7 tie, with SMU's
touchdown being made in the final
minute of play.
“When the chips were down and
they were on the one-yard line with
40 seconds to go, they marched
right down the field for a touch
down,” Zazula commented.
Asked to compare TCU and Ore
gon he declared simply not possible
because the two teams play alto
gether differently.
“However,” he continued, “like
we always say, we have a chance
against any team as long as we
have Van Brocklin and a good
line.”*
He added that the Webfoot team,
dejected about the Rose Bowl bid,
was elated when they heard of the
Cotton Bowl offer. “The team has
lots of enthusiasm and they’ll real
ly show the Northwest what they
can do.
“SMU will give us one of the
best games we’ve had this year,”
he concluded.
Graduating Class
To Hold Reunion
The 1943 graduating class of
Vancouver high school is planning
a class reunion to be held December
28 at Shumway junior high school,
Vancouver, Washington, from 6:45
to 12 p. m.
Price per couple is $5., which in
cludes a banquet and dance. For
reservations, contact June Lineham,
614 E. 28th Street, Vancouver,
phone 987. Reservations must be
made by December 15, 1948.
Red Cross Slates
Exec Council Meet
The executive council of the cam
pus Red Cross will meet at the An
chorage today at 5:30 p.m. for din
ner. Guests will be the Oregon
State College Red Cross council.
Purpose of the joint meeting is
to discuss programs for the 1948
49 school year as well as problems
encountered by both groups, ac
cording to Helen McFetridge, cam
pus Red Cross chairman.
FRATERNITY JEWELRY
XMAS DISPLAY
Crested Rings, Pins, Novelties, Stationery, Leather
Goods, China Steins, Etc.
WITH ONLY A FEW EXCEPTIONS
WE CAN MAKE XMAS DELIVERIES
ON TUES. & WED., ONLY—Nov. 30 & Dec. 1
2:00 p. m. to 8 p. m.
UPSTAIRS INSIDE
COLLEGE SIDE INN
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
807 General Insurance Bldg., Seattle
MARK McCOLM, REPRESENTATIVE
r
STOP WORRYING!
TAKE DAD ARROW SHIRTS
FOR CHRISTMAS!
I
"HULL"
$3.65
....
ARROW SPORTS SHIRTS FROM $4.00
There's nothing your Dad,
brother or rich uncle
would like better than
Arrows for Christmas.
So why waste vacation
time shopping? Just see
your local Arrow dealer
for some practical gift
suggestions.
For example—Arrow's fine
W white shirts are always
Jj, welcome, and a warm and
colorful Arrow sports shirt
would be a perfect gift for
an outdoor Dad !
A few nice Arrow t!. s
might hit the spot. $1 io
$2.50. Or how about a
box of fine Arrow hand
kerchiefs with Dad's initial?
See your Arrow Dealer.
Jr
ARROW
HANDKERCHIEFS from 35c
ARROW
--->
SHIRTS and TIES
J