Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, November 23, 1948, Page 8, Image 8

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    Dick Rayburn Cast in
'School for Scandal
The world of make-believe is
nothing new for Dick Rayburn, jun
ior in speech, who will appear in the
University Theatre presentation of
“School for Scandal,” starting De
cember 3. He has roles in five
University productions, and has
just been initiated into National
Collegiate Players.
Perhaps the “heaviest” role that
Dick has played was that of Mich
ael James in “Playboy of the West
ern World.”
"To make me look solid,” he con
fided, “I had to wear three thick
cotton pads with fourteen yards of
muslin wrapped around them. It
- was very difficult to breath, and I
had to say lines, too.”
But overcoming difficulties is
new for this veteran thespian. Af
ter his experiences on tour with
“Dover Road” last year, Dick will
be prepared for anything, when
School for Scandal hits the road in
January. “When we played Junc
tion City,” he reminisced, "we had
curtain trobule. It would close, all
right, but would immediately jerk
about a third of the way open again.
It required split-second timing to
get off the stage without being
seen.”
School for Scandal was written
in the 18th century and has been
acclaimed by every type of audi
ence since then. The stage settings
and costumes for the production
are a work of art, but the lines are
especially difficult to memorize, be
cause of the unusual wording.
“The play is a sort of satire,”
Dick commented. “It is a brisk,
light comedy of situation.” He is
cast in the role of Joseph Surface,
a smug, conceited hypocrite, and
the villian of the play.
“School for Scandal,” under the
direction of Mrs. Ottilie T. Seybolt,
opens a one-week run on December
3.
Classified Ads
WANTED: Tutor for math 10. Con
tact Delton Porter C-29. McChes
ney evenings. 49
REWARD: $25.00 reward for infor
mation resulting in apprehension
of person who stole a black light
weight 3-speed bicycle from front
lawn of school of education be
tween 4 and six p. m. Monday,
Nov. 15. Call 315. 48
WANTED: Advance accounting
student for interesting special job
in Business Office. Requires
geocl knowledge of inventory con
trol methods. Must be able to
work about four hours per day
for several weeks period. Good
pay. Call E. W. Martin, 3300, Ex.
206. 51
FOR SALE: Log Duplex decitrig
and case. Keyffel Essler. Call
2561-R 47-48-49
FOR SALE: New Spencer Micro
scope for sale. Movable stage,
oil emersion. Contact Les Jones,
Phone 5273. 52
WANTED: Ride for two to Pendle
ton or vicinity Wednesday P. M
Will share expenses. Call Peggy
Ext. 445. 4£
TUTORING: Eng. Comp., German
Algebra. M. G. Marcy, 361E
14th Ave. 51
FOR SALE: Dark Blue Double
breasted Suit. In good condition.
Phone 2483-J. 5<
A feminist is a woman who cite:
the Cambridge Mayorality situatior
as an example of the way men rur
things.
Mueller: X~ray
to Alter Future?
Descendants of many generations
hence may be born with permanent
hereditary deficiencies and ailments
brought about by present X-ray
treatments of certain diseases, Dr.
H. J. Muller, Nobel prize winner in
medicine, told students last night
at Chapman hall.
On a tour covering a number of
colleges and universities in the
United States, Dr. Muller presented
the results of important investiga
tions he has been making.
He explained that the damage to
be expected from the X-ray treat
ments is of the same kind as that
wrought by radiation from an at
om-bomb explosion, though not in
the same degree, and referred fo
high frequency radiation impinging
on the reproductive tissues as the
only outside influence found this far
which affects heredity to any great
degree.
Hereditary changes—almost al
ways unfavorable ones—are pro
duced either by affecting individual
genes or by breaking apart whole
chromosomes, the fragments of
which may subsequently reunite in
ways that are not to the advantage
of later generations, he said.
Dr. Muller is a professor of zool
ogy at Indiana university. He spoke
under the auspices of Sigma Xi, na
tional scientific research society.
Soph Commision
Meet Postponed
The YWCA sophomore commis
sion dinner meeting, originally
scheduled for tonight, has been
postponed until next Tuesday, ac
cording to Barbara Stevenson,
sophomore commission president.
The next meeting will be a des
sert meeting at 6 p.m. in the Y
bungalow. Each person attending
is asked to bring money to contrib
ute to the purchasing of a CARE
package.
Kentucky Derby Date
Proposed by Directors
LOUISVILLE, Ky„ Nov. 23 (AP)
May 7 is the tentative date of the
I 1949 Kentucky Derby.
Chairmen of Campus Chest
Campaign Receive 'Oscars'
Julio Silva, county chairman of the Community Chest Drive, presents
“Oscars” to Paul R. Washke and Virgil Tucker.
Paul R. Washke, professor of
physical education, and Virgil
Tucker, senior in business, were
awarded “Oscars” for their work
in making the University the
first unit in Lane county to top
its Community Chest quota.
Washke acted as general chair
man for the campus drive and
Tucker as student chairman. Al
pha Phi Omega, national service
fraternity, helped to conduct the
drive.
$4025 was topped by $275 in the
$4025 was topped by 275 in the
drive, held two weeks prior to
the kickoff of the regular coun
ty chest in order to complete the
canvass before Thanksgiving
holidays.
YWCA Sets Meet
For Frosh Officers
Ail freshman commission offi
cers of the YWCA will be the
guests of the junior commission to
night for a dessert meeting at 6:30
at the home of Velma Snelstrom,
Joan O’Neill, chairman, announced.
The evening will bo a combina
tion of fun and informal discus
sions. All girls invited are being
I called and are asked to meet at
j the YWCA where transportation
will be provided.
ii
When you're studying late—
FRUIT AND CANDY
will hit the spot.
We have a fine selection
at
University Grocery
790 E. 11th Phone 1597
flacklyn'i Dance Siudio
Beginning- or advanced instruction in modern ball
room dancing . . . conducted by Jacklyn Henderson,
recently from New York—formerly with ARTHUR
MURRAY.
Ill _
FOX TROT
WALTZ
JITTERBUG
RHUMBA
SAMBA
TANGO
24 W. 7th Ave.
MALI'Mrir.u Air.in
C'll) makes lessons fun as
well as beneficial . . . for
grace, poise, self-confi
dence, posture, health and
exercise.
R E A S 0 X A B L E R A T E S.
No charge for guest lesson
and dance analysis.
Phone 235-W
l-rench I eacners to Meet
The Pacific Northwest chapter
of the American Association of
Teachers of French will meet at
Reed college in Portland, Decem
ber 4, Dr. C. L. Johnson, president
of the chapter and associate pro
fessor of Romance languages at the
University, has announced.
Rene Picard, assistant professor
of Romance languages here will
speak on “L’Esprit Frondeur” and
problems of interest to French
teachers and students will be dis
cussed.
US Foriegn
Policy Is
IRC Theme
American Foreign Policy will be
the theme of the Northwest Inter
national Relations Club conference,
scheduled December 3 and 4 in Eu- •
gene.
Nearly 200 delegates from 30 col- ..
leges in Oregon, Washington, Ida
ho, Montana, British Columbia, and
Alberta are expected to attend the
two-day convention.
Round table topics chosen by the
University’s club, the host group,
include major problems of U. S. -
foreign policy, the European Re
covery Plan, the Japanese peace
settlement, the problem of China,
and the problem of economic assis
tance to Latin America.
Committee chairmen in charge of
the preparations include: Ed Van
Natta, program; Bob Hammill, *
housing; Barbara Murray, meals;
Mary Harvey, literature; Margaret
Winslow, registration; Bob Miller,
dance; and Betty Lagomarsino,
publicity and bulletin.
Glenn G. Morgon is president of
the local IRC, and Dr. C. P. Sch
leicher, professor in political sci- “
ence, is faculty advisor.
Margaret Roberts
Jean Burgess
Jeanne Hoffman
SALES:
Larry Prairie
Pattie Finnegan
J
A Thanksgiving
Bouquet or
Corsage will
graciously express
your appreciation
to Your Hostess
♦ ♦ ♦
Wayne's Flowers
849 E 13th Phone 7172
Yeh, but it takes time
and I need money!
Sincerely, we’re for every college student
finishing his education. Do it if you possibly
can. But, many students start out, and through
unforeseen circumstances find themselves out
on a limb, as far as time and money goes.
It is you students who find yourselves in this
position, of having to earn money and become
self-supporting in shorter length of time, we
may be able to help.
Aviation, today, offers you a prosperous
future career with great opportunities and pos
sibility of advancement to positions of respon
sibility and more money in a shorter time. For
full information
l WRITE OR RHONE
Mr. J. D. Strickland
CAL-AERO TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
GRAND CENTRAL AIR TERMINAL
GLENDALE 1, CALIFORNIA
v Rhone: Citrus 1-2101