Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, February 27, 1947, Page 7, Image 7

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    Extension .Benefits
Stressed for Vets
Students can earn as many as 60
hours to be applied toward a degree
through the auspices of the general
extension division, Miss Mozelle
Hair, head of correspondence
study, announced.
Miss Hair stressed the benefits
to GIs who are unable to take full
benefit of the GI bill in regards to
education at the present time.
Through a contract with the veter
ans’ administration, veterans may
register under the GI bill, receive
full benefits for tuition and other
educational expenses, and only lose
one fourth of the schooling time to
which they are entitled.
Over 200 college courses are of
FOR THAT
AFTERNOON
and EVENING
SNACK
Stop in at
KELLER’S
DUTCH GIRL
1224 Willamette
Phone 1932
;
HAMBURGERS
♦ SHAKES
♦ SUNDAES
FOR
QUICK SERVICE
and
LASTING
SATISFACTION
The
PROGRESSIVE
SHOE SHOP
75 W. Broadway
KEEP YOUR SHOES
LOOKING NEW!
Dean Announces
Reference Booklet
Dean George S. Turnbull of the
journalism school announced that
a five-page mimeographed book
let listing primary reference works
for newspaper offices was being
distributed this week to Oregon
newspapers.
The booklet, "The Editor's
Workshelf” was compiled by Wil
liam M. Tugman, managing editor
of the Eugene Register-Guard, and
issued by the Eric W. Allen Memo
rial Fund of the University’s school
of journalism. Copies of the work
were also presented to delegates
attending the Oregon Press Con
ference here last week.
fered, in the fields of architecture,
astronomy, aviation, engineering,
geography, geology, history, home
economics, journalism, library,
mathematics, languages, physics,
political science, psychology, secre
tarial science, and sociology.
This work may be done during the
summer or started at any time of
the year as this office operates con
tinuously. The general extension di
vision is a separate branch under
the directorship of the Oregon state
board of higher education. This of
fice, located on the second floor of
the general extension and r adio stu
dio building, is the only correspon
dence department of higher educat
ion sponsored by the state.
About 260 ex-GIs have registered
during the past year.
Urban League Offers
Social Fellowships
The National Urban league for
social service among Negroes is
offering two fellowships for study
] in social work and economics for
; the school year of 1947-48. The
j fellowships are available to Ne
I gro graduates of accredited col
leges whose majors are in social
sciences.
The two fellowships are: the
Ella Sachs Plotz award for $1200,
including remitted tuition from
the New York School of Social
Work, Columbia University, and
an $1100 award from the Univer
stiy of Pittsburgh for graduates in
sociology and economics.
Applications must be made by
March 15 to the National Urban
League, 1133 Broadway, New
York City.
PLACE ORDERS FOR
FLOWERS — ANY KIND
(Flowers from Archambeau’s)
\
860 L.13T“ .SL
HARDWARE GOODS
EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN HARDWARE
—PLUS—
• Auto Accessories
• Tools
• Paints
• Gillette Tires
Sporting Goods and Housewares
Marshall 8c Meyer
“Your Marshall-Wells Dealer”
94 W. 3th St.
Eusrene
Phone 4461
o26 Main St.
Springfield
Phone 423
KORE to Present
Talk, Original Play
"isanaa lor Tolerance, an orig
inal radio play by Shirley Peters,
junior in journalism, will be pre
sented over radio station KORE at
10:30 a.m. Thursday, as an intro
duction to the talk on racial dis
crimination to be given by Edwin
Berry, executive secretary of the
Portland Urban league, March 3 at
the YWCA bungalow.
Berry's talk will concern the bill
soon to be introduced to the Oregon j
legislature equalizing the economic
status of Negroes to that of the j
white race, and making it a misde- i
meanor to deny employment to any
•person because of race or color.
Members of the cast of the radio
play, which will be produced and
directed by Eloise Rockwell, are
Paul Ryman, Theo Feikert, Don
Stewart, David Waite, and Helen
Nelson.
Mrs. G. H. Good of Eugene is in
charge of the meeting.
Just Arrived
Heavyweight
CORDS
and
Heavyweight
Copper-King
Ryder's Jeans!
at
The Store Where
“It’s A Pleasure to
Serve You”
61 E. Broadway
CHEN Yin
!.?} \r\'
•V/ _ S
■ '**U
LfilPW
u
Rich, rich pink vitli the
assuring blue that winks
from diamonds . . . for your
nails, your lips.
Lacquer, 50c. All-metal Lipstick, $1.00.
Smart Set— Lacquer, Lipstick,
Twincot*> $1.75 plus tax
T iff any-Davis
8th & Willamette
'
You'll want to look
your best
for
Spring — so
Have your skirts
cleaned NOW
j
i
<
i
i
!
!
i
643 E. 13th
Phone 317
Scab/ ^houJUe *7cJJz
by
Keep them guessing in “HAUD
TO-(',P'/r, the newest Cdentex
conversation - m a k i n g scarf.
Whether it's vcs, no or mavbe—
all
the answers are gaily scrawled
\
on your colorful spun rayon
square. In emerald and yellow,
aqua and rose, turquoise and
black, flame and yellow.
2.25
As seen in
SEVENTEEN .
EUGENES FASHION CENTEH