Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, January 04, 1947, Page 6, Image 6

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    Dr. Noble Reports
On Jap Occupation
“The final answer as to how long
Diir troops will have to remain in
Japan,’’ Dr. Harold J. Noble, facul
ty member and authority on the Far
East, said, “will be decided when
we discover just what are our rela
tions with Russia.’’
Dr. Noble has just returned to
Eugene after serving 10 months as
i Far Eastern correspondent with
the Saturday Evening Post. Coun
tries covered by the writer included
the Philippines, Korea, Dutch East
indies, Japan, and Australia. Dr.
Noble's articles dealt mainly with
tonditions in Japan and Australia.
He left the University in December,
1941, and served in the marines un
til 1944k
Allies Determine Policies
“Japan is under the military gov
ernment of the United States,” Dr.
Noble said, “but England, Russia
md China also have sent officers to
Japan.” These groups, he said, help
ietermine the policy used in gov
erning the Asiatic country.
Men and women in Japan have
(. much higher regard for Emperor
lirohito since he began mixing
vith common people, Dr. Noble
dated. “They regard him more as
|
| WANTED
PIANIST
'to play for
University Dance Class
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Miss Wentworth
Immediately
a friend now,” he continued, "rath
er than as the almost unapproach
able authority he was thought to be
before the close of the war.”
News Agency Stopped
One of the first tasks completed
by the Americans after they en
tered Japan, Dr. Noble said, was
the discontinuance of the Domei
news agency which was a semi-gov
ernmental agency. “Domei has been
replaced by two new agencies, Ky
odo and Ji Ji,” he added, “and they
are now the only competing Japan
ese agencies.” The Associated
Press, United Press and the Inter
national News Service are the Unit
ed States agencies in Japan. “The
Japanese agencies are not allowed
to criticize the occupying power,”
Dr. Noble said.
“Today,” he continued, “the most
important thing in Japan is learn
ing the English language.” He add
ed that every Japanese who has
gone to high school took English
and that college graduates usually
speak English fairly well and read
it fluently.
“Japan will have to be rebuilt,”
Noble said, “and ways must be
found for the Japanese to get on
their feet by themselves. As yet, he
said, the United States hasn’t
helped them to find a way to resume
manufacturing so they could fcp
able to begin rebuilding.
Cougar Cagers
(Coniiinieil from page jour)
ing if they are going to be able to
hit the finals.
At the time, they wished they had
the exams finished, but when the
long list of flunks at Johnson hall
was mentioned to them, they were
n’t quite so sure of their first idea.
You couldn’t say they were
nervous, and they weren’t cocky
either. They didn’t talk too much,
although an occasional joke did
flip between them, mainly at the
WEARING
APPAREL
FOR
COLLEGE GIRLS
Webfoots!
A checking account is the Safe
Way to protect your funds against
loss.
The businesslike way to pay
use a
•CHECKING ACCOUNT
S?i X'
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Eugene, Ore.
Serving Lane County Since lSSo
i , Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
expense of those who weren’t
dressed and those who were us
ing excessive amounts of tape for
muscle supporters.
Coach Jack Friel gave his boys a
last minute “booster” pep talk, but
he wasn’i, chewing any cigar vi
ciously as usually credited to pre
game moments of coaches.
Not that they didn’t trust the
Oregon students, but the Cougars
collected their jewelry and other
important haberdashery items,
pooled them in a barracks bag and
turned it over to Oregon equipment
manager Harry Dobson for safe
keeping under lock and key.
White dextrose tables were
distributed to all the casaba men
just before they left for their
practice shots and the team mem
bers ate heartily on their confec
tionery.
Visiting teams come and go at
McArthur court—the Cougars were
hospitable to even a foreign report
er who edged into their midst." Cred
it them with a fine bunch of bas
keteers, both on the floor and in
the locker room.
Veterans Give Concert
Rex John Underwood and William
Shisler, both freshmen in music,
will give a joint violin concert at
the music school auditorium at 8
p.m. January 14.
Both Underwood, the son of Pro
fessor Rex Underwood of the music
school, and Shisler are veterans,
giving their first concerts at the
University.
Hallock Plays Jantzen
Ted Hallock, senior in journalism,
and his 15-piece orchestra will play
a one-night engagement at Jantzen
Beach park, Portland, tonight. Feat
ured vocalist with the orchestra is
Joyce Gordon, sophomore in music.
ATTEND THE
CHURCH of
YOUR CHOICE
GRACE LUTHERAN
CHURCH
11th & Ferry
Rev. YV. B. Maier, pastor
Church School, 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service at 11 a.m.
Gamma Delta for Lutheran students
and friends, Sunday, 5 p. m.
CENTRAL
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10th Ave. at Pearl
Rev. Norman K. Tully, Pastor
Servicemen, Students, and visitors
cordially welcomed at Divine Worship
FIRST CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
1166 Oak Street
Hugh N. McCallum, Pastor
University Classes, 9:45 a.m.
Dr. Victor P. Morris, teacher
Town and Campus Group, 6:15
Bible Breakfast Forum, 9:40 a.m.
(donuts and coffee)
Worship Services, 11 a.m., 7:30 p.m.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
490 13th Ave. Fast
Phone 4192
Wesley Goodson Nicholson, Minister
Morning Worship. 11 a.m.
Mary S. Grubbs
Director of Student Work
Student Supper, 6 p.m.
ST. MARY’S ESPICOPAL
CHURCH
Rev. F. S. Bartlam, Rector
Rev. Ilal R. Gross. Student Pastor
Services at 8 and 11
Wednesday at 7 a.m. at Gerlinger Hall
Canterbury Club, 5 :30 at Church
FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
12th and Willamette
I.. O. Griffith, Minister
Robt. J. Bull, Assoc. Pastor
Morning Worship, 11 a.m.
Youth Fellowship, 6:30
Wesley House, on campus
Dave Seaman, director
Student supper, 5 :30
Recital, 6:30
Discussion Group, 7:00
Banter _
(Continued front page tivo)
triumphantly, it seemed. “D’ya give
up?” he asked. We answered “yes”
in sheer desperation. “Then I win,
because you gave up,” he shouted
gleefully.
* * *
The Times and the sun—Won
der how long the Eugene Regis
ter-Guard could stay in business if
it followed the same policy as the
St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times,
which gives away its newspapers
every day the sun fails to shine.
Youth and fear—Maybe it is true
what they say about the carefree
days of youth. Last November the
Des Moines Register polled six peo
ple on the question, “What do you
fear the most?” Three housewives
expressed their respective fears of
poverty, another war, and black
cats. A student feared “what people
think about me and my work, those
unknown things, thought and said
by others”; and a railroad brake
man feared a terrible wreck. A 16
year-old delivery boy made a state
ment which will probably serve him
well if he doesn’t forget it in grow
ing up. He said, “I’m not afraid of
anything. There’s nothing to be
afraid of. I don’t go to school. If I
lose something, it’s lost. I’ve always
been able to eat.”
START the NEW YEAR RIGHT
BY ATTENDING CHURCH
11 a. m. "A MOTTO FOR 1947"
University Class 9:45 a. m. Fellowship 6:30 p. m.
7:30 p. m.—"WHAT IS YOUR LIFE?"
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bdwy. at High Dr. V. Webster, pastor
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