Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, October 04, 1946, Page 2, Image 2

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    Oregon W Emerald
MARGUERITE WITTWER-WRIGHT
Editor
GEORGE PEGG
Business Manager
JEANNE SIMMONDS
Women’s Editor
BOBBIE FULMER
Advertising Manager
JACK L. BILLINGS
Managing Editor
MARYANN THIELEN
and WALT McKINNEY
Assistant Managing Editors
HERB PENNY
News Editor
BOBOLEE BROPHY
Assistant News Editor
JUNE GOETZE
Assistant Women’s Editor
BERNIE HAMMERBECK
Sports Editor
BILL STRATTON, WALLY HUNTER
Assistant Sports Editors
ROGER TETLOW DON JONES
Chief Night Editor Staff Photographer
““ EDITORIAL BOARD
Tom Kay, Byron Mayo, Bea King, Billie Johns
Faculty Adviser—Dean George Turnbull
Published Daily except Sundays, Mondays, holidays, and during
the final exam periods, by the Associated Students, University of Ore
gon
Entered as second class matter at the postoffice, Eugene, Oregon.
Features and columns in tlie Emerald reflect the opinions of the
writers. They do not necessarily represent the opinion of the editorial
staff, the student hotly, or the University.
Demonstration by Druids
Many readers assume that Emerald edits forever attack, and/
or criticize. We hasten to point out their error, by commending
the Druids for oik! of the most spirited political moves witnessed
in several years.
As of five p.m., last night, Marty Pond’s junior honorary had
netted five hundred registrants for voting, doing business at
their Co-op stand. Druid men, deputized to accept registrations,
•worked in shifts through the day, and will re-open the*ir booth
this morning at 8:45 ; accepting registrations until noon.
We all talk a good game of politics, but fewt>f us manage to
do anything about it. Druids, with mouths shut, have rung up a
record for good citizenship that will be hard to beat. Though offi
cial figures were not available at press time as to the total num
ber of legally-aged students on the campus, Pond did set the near
total of eligible veterans at 1850, of which Druids have signed
almost a third.
Unless veterans, and students 'in general, have registered
.elsewhere, now is the time. All it takes is one minute at the Co-op,
a pen, and a little will-power. If you are registered elsewhere in
the state, you may change your precinct to one in Eugene, by
filling out a chauge-of-address card at the Druid booth.
Remember, you can't help elect, or defeat, come November 5,
unless your name is on the official list. You have until noon today.
DO IT! DON’T TALK ABOUT IT!
To Marty Pond, and all Druids, our sincere commendation
for great Americanism.
With Sympathy
Complaints from veterans who are missing their third meal on
Sunday have reached the Emerald. No Sunday evening suppers
have been served them in the John Straub dining hall for the past
two weeks, it is reported. The men, understandably, are a little
unhappy about it.
Women living in the dorms have also been wondering why the
traditional Sunday evening "teas" have been discontinued. The
situation becomes more complicated when the fact that several
of the campus restaurants are closed on Sunday is considered.
This means the cafes which do remain open find it difficult to
handle the number of customers, and students who are hungry
enough are forced to go downtown Sunday night.
The tendency in a case like this is for the victims to imme
diately think of the $3C monthly T . fee and to blame dormitory
authorities. This, of course, is is i uhe accurate.
The cost of food In this in : , period makes $36 a month
.look ridiculously low. One si.. ... kmg box of groceries at
retail comes to about $15 and i <'t feed two persons for aj
week, as married veterans cert. . now. But $36 takes a big
chunk out of a single veicr.n. .a-wule $t>5 monthly allow
ance.
Ant only is food expensive. .. neat and other lood for a
varied and healthy diet is <e-ar.c. . edition., help is almost im
possible to’ fin'd- -as-evidenced h\ • high wages being paid for
waitresses and cooks everywhere . he facts are common know-!
.edge, hut few hungry students < : ;hen- wav downtown Sunday
night to catch a hamburger (for SO cents) stop to consider them.
Mrs. L'urnipsced has pointed out that cmplovees must be
given some time off . Sunday night is the obvious time because
many students do not sta\ on the campus for meals then. The
director of dormitories also assures students that the situation is
temporary. Every effort is being made to secure help and con
tinue the Sunday evening meals. It should also be noted that
many school dormitories never serve more than two meals on
Sunday.
No amount of comforting words from anyone will fill an
empty spot in a map’« stomach. And students can't eat explana
tory Emerald editorials—yet. Maybe the time will come . . .
Plea for the Defendant
Among' the problems facing the administration as a result of a
greatly swollen student body is the inadequacy of space and ser
vices at the University library.
Since more students have greater contact with the library
than any other single campus institution, criticism of it is loud
and prevalent. Yet if the facts were known the criticisms would
become expressions of sympathy.
The greatest bone of contention is lack of service in the
reserve and circulation departments. Students wishing books are
often forced to wait from thirty minutes to an hour. The cause is
obviously traceable to a dearth of student workers—a dearth
which is not difficult to explain.
The library is serving 5600 students with a staff no more size
able than that in the years when enrollment figures were between
two and three thousand. Yet the urgent plea for employees has
not been answered for a very good reason.
Applicants for library work are confronted with a prospective
salary of forty cents per hour for the first six months. At a time
when national and campus living expenses are mounting rapidly,
the inadequacy of this wage is unpleasantly apparent. Who can
be found to work at the library for 40 cents when salaries are con
siderably higher elsewhere?
This condition cannot be remedied by the library management
alone. Funds for the maintenance of the institution are appro
priated far in advance of the school year by the state board of
higher education. Since the library budget is limited, an increase
in salaries is impossible without additional funds. If the library’s
need is evident, special appropriations can be made by President
Newburn through the traditional channels.
To the students whose constant use of the library is impera
tive, there is no doubt that the need is evident. If a “living wage”
were offered, it is doubtful that librarians would find themselves
in their present situation.
Existing plans for additions to both wings and the library
stacks cannot materialize quickly enough to relieve the space
pressure in a building built to accommodate only 700 students.
But with additional workers, the problem of space would be de
creased in part, at least. Dr. R. C. Swank, head librarian, has
revealed his intention to keep the browsing room and other study
rooms open continuously during library hours as soon as super
visors can be found.
Until the administration acknowledges the urgency of the
library situation, until salaries are raised and adequate service
obtained, University students will have to remember the source
of the trouble—and show consideration for the efforts of well
meaning but over-worked employees of the library.
COME TO
DORSEY’S
U - BOWL
11 tli & Willamette
Downstairs
For an Evening of
RELAXATION
STB W '
DOWLING
VOUFIT..
\
Good
luck
to
the
DUCKS
in
Saturday's
Game
Varnify
By SUDS CHANEY
and BOB MILLER
Squirrel Cage
Ellory Riem, Ki-Si, dates only Al
Fees. Don’t be shy, El, the other
girls like you too. Give ’em a break.
Wheatie kid Walt Donovan and
Vitamin kid Diane Mead, Gam Fi,
have gone into a huddle. Hope you
score, Walt, the opposition looks
weak.
Joe and Robbie Burr Courtney’s
recent housewarming proved also
heartwarming for Sig Nu Don
Shaeffer and Ki-O Elaine Taylor,
Another good man on the bench.
Woodman Spare That Tree
There is a big drive on to cut
down the old apple trees between
the SAE house and the Ki-O house
It seems they interfere with the
binocular range. Suggestion to
SAEs: another two weeks and the
leaves will fall off anyway.
I’m a Big Man Now
Mr. Renny Young ATO pledge
nods politely to ex-past high school
steady June Clayton. Good B.M.O.C.
material.
Elementary school attendance in
the United States reached a peak of
more than 23,000,000 in the early
FOR THAT
“SMART LOOK”
A TAILORED ELOUSE
FROM
Hailes
hAPPARELbbmb]044 Will
It’s EASY
to be in
Step with
LOVELY
LEGS... erase “ heir with
BELLIN’S
WONDERSTOEN!
YV hither in nylons or ank
lets, your legs can only
look best without unlovely ,
hair. Wbnderstoe n
erases hair and keeps
your legs super-sniooth
without any injurious
effects.
MILLER!/
fr'