Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, February 08, 1945, Image 1

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    Campus Looks
To the Future
. . . See page 2
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, EUGENE, THURSDAY, FEB. 8~ 1945
'Hospitality' Miss
Tells Life Story
. . . See page 4
NUMBER n
VOLUME XLVI
ASUO Probe of Building Bill Completed
OSC Sends Talent
To Assembly Today
- 'Stay in your own pond” is the theme of the Oregon State
produced all-campus assembly in McArthur court this morning
at 11. The first exchange assembly to be presented this year,
this production promises to be '‘sensational,” according to Au
drey Holliday, ASUO president, who arranged the assemblies.
The program will be emceed by OSC Beaver Virginia Clare
and is expected to last 40 minutes.
Twqnty-eight other Beavers will
make up the cast, and music will
be provided by the University band
under the direction of John Stehn.
The surprise element in the pro
gram will be kept secret until it is
announced at ihe assembly. Rum
ors from informed sources on this
campus reveal no details of the
information to be given students,
but intimate that it will be of im
portance to all University citizens.
The assembly may extend over
the usual 50-mimtte limit, and
lunch hour in all campus living or
ganizations has been advanced to
12:15.
Tickets to the Citrus Mix dance,
scheduled to follow the Oregon
Oregon State game Saturday night,
will be sold at the assembly. Phyl
Perkins, war stamp promotion
chairman, announced Wednesday
tljat war stamps will also be on
sale in the Igloo between 11 and
noon.
Veteran Enrollment
Expected to Rise
War veteran enrollment in the
University is expected to increase
spring term, and become increas
ingly greater by next fall, accord
ing to Vernon Basler, training of
ficer for the veterans administra
tion office in Portland. Mr. BaslSr,
who supervises the training of vet
erans under public laws 16 and 36,
was on the campus Wednesday
afternoon to consult with veterans
3ft individual problems.
“Most of the veterans seem hap
py in their work here, and appre
ciate their opportunities,” Basler
said. “On the whole they are doing
satisfactorily, and are well adapted
to the work. They are interested in
it, and in preparing for good posi
tions.”
On visits to campuses through
out the state, Mr. Basler has found
the ex-servicemen active in stu
dent offices, activities, and ath
letics. The fact that they are older
and more mature gives them an
advantage, he remarked. He added
that the veterans do help the man
shortage on the campus. “We’d
like to put a veteran on the cam
py#; for every girl,” he laughed.
The veterans administration rep
resentative complimented Virgil
D. Earl, dean of men, on his work
as “main contact man” for the vet
erans on the campus. “He is doing
a good job, is interested in the
boys, and knows how to help them.
Any additional help may be had
by writing to the veterans admin
istration in Portland.”
Since training veterans is rela
tively new, some difficulties in ad
ministration are occurring, Mr.
Easier said. These are being
worked out, and will be remedied
eventually.
■4kr. Basler also met with vet
erans in the vocational school.
Sheldon Lecture
Set, 7:30 P.M.
Recognized as an authority on
political liberalism in England and
America, Dr. Henry D. Sheldon,
professor emeritus of history and
education, will speak tonight at
7:30 in room 12, Friendly hall.
According to J. B. Jewell, dean
of the school of education, it is
probable that there is no other
University professor in the United
States who is more of a recog
nized authority on the history of
liberalism, both in England and
America.
Dr. Sheldon will comment on
European situations and discuss
means of avoiding them in Amer
ica. He will also stress factors
necessary to insure liberal govern
ment in the future.
This is the third of a series of
University lectures, sponsored by
the faculty, under the direction of
Dr. Rudolph Ernst.
Originality, Color
Sought in Banners
Signs for the war rally Saturday
night are to be judged for origin
ality of slogans, color, and general
makeup, Betty Wilson, sign con
test chairman announced today.
There is no size restriction on
them,, and they should be relative
to the Oregon-Oregon State game
Saturday night at McArthur court.
The banners will be carried by
each living organization from the
houses to the rally at Johnson
hall, where judges will announce
the winner of the contest.
Counselling Positions
Open to University Coeds
Word has been received from
Portland headquarters of the Camp
Fire Girls that Miss Elizabeth
Blair, secretary of Portland Camp
Fire Girls, will be on the campus
Friday, February 9, to interview
coeds interested in counseling girls
at Camp Namanu next summer.
Miss Blair will be in the Alumni
room in Gerlinger hall Friday af
ternoon, at which time questions
will be answered and applications
made available.
Obituary
Professor Igor Schmaltz died
February 7, 1945. Cause: suicide
by bullet in left temple; dismay
over curiosity of what or who
“It” is. Funeral services at Hend
ricks park Saturday night. Free
beer!!!!
PUGNACIOUS
John Moore, ireshman in liberal
arts, who will take the part of
the prizefighter who cheats death
in the University theater version
of the movie, “Here Conies Mr.
Jordan,” opening in Guild hall
tomorrow night.
Today’s World
WASHINGTON, London and
Moscow simultaneously an
nounced Wednesday that the Big
Three were meeting in the Black
sea area. Discussion topics were
reported to be: joint plans for
the occupation and control of
Germany, political and economic
problems of liberated Europe,
and proposals for the earliest
possible establishment of a per
manent international organiza
tion to maintain peace.
THE SIEGFRIED LINE is
buckling under Allied pressure
and is reported to have been
broken through in at least one
place.
OPTIMISM over the eastern
front situation is shown in Soviet
dispatches which say that the
battle for Berlin has begun.
TWO MORE U. S. air bases in
China have fallen to the ad
vancing Japs. One of them,
Namyung, was also a producing
center from which wolfram was
sent to the American steet in
dustry.
AOPi Wins Honor
The Alpha Omieron Pi sorority
will have as their dinner guests
the King of Hearts and his two
knaves, for they were the first
house on the eampus to reach a
total of 100 per eent purchase of
tickets to the Heart Hop. The Al
pha Gamma Delta, Sigma Kappa,
and Pi Beta Phi sororities will be
presented with a dance record
each, for placing second and third,
respectively, in the contest.
Intramural Games
Intramural schedule for today:
Sherry Ross vs. Yeomen, 3 p.in.
Esquires vs. Campbell coop, 3:45
p.m.
University Students Asked
To Write Home, Secure
Parents' Backing on Project
By WINIFRED ROMTVEDT
Students Wednesday were urged to write home to their)
parents on behalf of the building program of the state system
of higher education. The request came from a committee ap
pointed by the executive council of the ASUO to inform citi
zens of the building program which is in the ways and means
committee of the legislature.
With its investigation on the inadequacy of building appro
priations completed, the committee is asking students to write
to their parents, alumni, and other influential people of the
state, and tell them why more money is needed, and why it
should be appropriated.
In planning a campaign for the advancement of University
and state system building, the executive council said they
hoped to impress upon the legislature the urgent need for the
‘long view” of higher educational development in this state—
looking toward the expected large increases in enrollment, r ad
Leads Criticize,
Praise Fantasy
By JEAN LAWRENCE
Tirades for and against intimate
style drama poured forth when
Annabelle WilUerson Davis and
John Moore, lead players in “Heav
en Can Wait,” were interviewed
Wednesday. The production opens
tomorrow night at 8, in Cerijnger
hall. i
Neither acl’or nas ever under
taken this type of acting before.
“You’ve got people all around you
and it’s harder to keep in char
acter,” was the way Moore ex
pressed it. Mrs. Davis thought it
new and interesting but agreed
that it was hard, especially com
ing on “stage,” and ordinary-sized
rug with the audience seated two
feet from the edge.
"Once I was feeling my way
for a chair on the stage and when
the lights came on, I had hold of
Director Robinson's leg! He was
sitting in the first row and I’d
come in the wrong entrance,” she
explained. Moore has been practic
ing skipping rope with his eyes
closed to get the effect.
People That Ain’t
Another difficulty with acting
“Heaven Can Wait,” according to
Moore, is talking to people that
ren’t there. “When Mr. Jordan and
I are ghosts, we hold long conver
sations while the other people on
stage, who supposedly can’t see us,
talk among themselves as if we
weren't there. It’s confusing!”
Didj'a Ever See a
Xmas Tree Walking?
Someone reported in the Eu
gene Register-Guard that a Uni
versity instructor was seen walk
ing down Willamette street on
February 1, wearing a black
straw hat decorated with red
Christmas tree trimmings. He
asked: “Are the milliners faced
with a shortage of materials?”
If they had indicated whether
the instructor was a man or
woman the answer to that ques
tion would be much simpler.
a fully-equipped institution con
structed by a definite pattern.
The main facts which the conn
mittee wishes students to usi in
informing their parents of tho
state system's needs are:
1. Unless adequate appropiia
tions a re made, there will be in suf
ficient room to take care of re
turned veterans at the close of tho
war.
2. The state board of higher edu
cation's proposal for building fund,**
has been cut to one million dollars
by the governor, and the commit
tee of the ASUO believes tit,at
amount left is entirely inadequate.
3. During the past 15 years, the
state has spent $100,000 within
the entire state system for build
ing. while some 15 buildings have
been built through the use of stu
dent funds. At the University, the
library, Chapman hall, and the in
firmary have been built with stu
dent money. Previous to the past
15 years, McArthur court and Hay
ward field were built in that way.
4. State appropriations for tho
state system of higher education
have been lower than any other
state in the west since the de
pression.
( A more elaborate discussion and
analysis of the situation is p>e
sented on page 2 of this issue.)
ISA Solons Elect
Member to Council
Harriet Farr, sophomore in ar
ch itectu re and allied arts, waa
elected to the position of IS! A
sophomore representative by tho
members of the ISA senate Tues
day.
Miss Farr has long been active*
in ISA affairs and promises to ful
fill the hopes.of the independent
senators. She will be filling tho
position vacated by Virginia Har
ris. As her specific job on the ISAJ
executive council includes super ■*
vision over all ISA social functions,
Miss Farr has made plans for an
extensive independent social cam-*
paign. A winter term ISA mixe*
and a series of tennis dances dur
ing spring term are planned.
Miss Farr represents Hendriel's
hall in the ISA senate. During her
freshman year she was a member
of the YWCA freshman council.