Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, October 21, 1944, Page 3, Image 3

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    Britisher Surprised
When Offered US Trip
By FLORA FURROW
Holding his pipe and looking as though he should be loung
ing in a big armchair with slippers, a glass, a book and a dog
before some roaring fireplace. Major (“it’s Peter, not Frank”)
Ashton, in between sips of coke and puffs on the pipe, answered
questions about himself Thursday.
“One day my colonel rang me up and asked if I'd like to go
to the United States. I said you’re
kidding, old boy. He said, no, he
wasn’t. So here I am,” the major
ended in his British accent, smiling
his British smile and crinkling the
corners around his deep-set British
eyes. “Of course everyone was very
"jfealous of me,” the Commando offi
cer added, casually easing his feet
onto the desk top.
“And where did you spend your
childhood?” we asked eagerly,
making mental notations of his
soft plaid linen shirt and tweed
suit — for he had discarded the
military uniform in favor of civil
ian dress.
It seems the major grew up in
the rural districts “a great deal
like the country around here” in
southern England near Sussex and
his boyh&od was filled with riding
horses to hounds, chasing foxes, at
-fcending a small private school that
“you couldn’t possibly have heard
of.”
The major’s father was killed in
the last war, his younger brother
is a lieutenant in southern France
—(this with a far-away look in
the battle-accustomed eyes of the
soldier) and his sister is “working
like hell” as a Wren in Britain.
During the conversation we
found that he landed in New York
about a month ago, “saw all the
clubs and hotels,” he confided, add
ing, “as far as I know” but fin
ished with “It got much more
colorful, however, when I reached
Not Time to Retire . . .
Time to Repair
DAN WYNN'S
Associated
Service
llth and Hilyard
Don't Let
Static
Interfere
with your
favorite
program
EUGENE
RADIO SHOP
128 E. 11th Ave.
Phone 4954
California." This was accompanied
by a blush spreading over the
tanned features of the young offi
cer, probably in memory of the
luncheon date with Joan Fontaine
in Hollywood.
Besides having luncheon and
swimming in Joan's private pool, he
had dinner with a fellow-Britisher,
Nigel Bruce, and “went to the most
incredible party I've ever seen.
There were hundreds and hundreds
of guests, (this with a wave of the
hand and an incredulous voice) it
lasted ALL night and everyone was
dressed in cowboy clothes. San
Francisco is quite the NICEST city
I’ve been in.”
Major Ashton made several radio
broadcasts and spoke to workers in
the four Richmond Kaiser yards
while in the Bay area under the
auspices of the British information
service.
In commenting on the interna
tional postwar situation, the major
stated he believed the future peace
of the world depends upon America
and Britain staying strong and
“working very closely together.”
He went on to say “I’m a soldier,
not a politician” and “say exactly
what I think. My opinions are not
necessarily those of Britain.”
When asked about his own per
sonal postwar plans he surprised
us by stating “I would like to set
tle down on the west coast of the
United States.” Well, er, ah, or,
why the west coast? “I was just
struck with it, that’s all . . . just
struck with it.”
We were interrupted in the 20
minute interview by a knock on the
door. The British major took his
feet off the desk, said goodbye and
was escorted to dinner by five (we
counted ’em) five girls.
Letters to the Editor
(Continued from page two)
wishful thinking <on our part. Our
country has done a thorough job
of poisoning minds against our
enemy, Japan. Hatred destroys the
mental and physical balance of a
nation and makes a poor founda
tion for the erection of a world
without hatred. It has been said
that “Hatred is a time-bomb that
explodes without warning, wreak
ing havoc upon the hated and the
haters alike.’’
But, if this reconversion is an
actual possibility anti becomes a
realization in the near future, then
I have doubts about the justifica
tion of our hatred in the first
place. If we can suddenly drop our
hatred from us like a mask, isn’t
that a pretty clear sign that we
were purposefully blinding our
selves in the first place?
The writer of the editorial said
that “University of Oregon stu
dents and faculty who knew the
Yasui family, Mary Furoshi, Ise
Inezuka, and countless other Jap
anese-Americans once enrolled here
will tell you that they were capable
of desires and love and ambition
as any other human beings.” If we
believed this before the war, or if
w-e suddenly decide to believe it
after the war, then why shouldn't
W'e believe it during the war itself?
Why should the principles of
democracy and Christianity take a
holiday during the time of war?
The answer is, of course, just as
the author of the editorial stated,
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
Toys - Candy - Notions
Back Number Magazines
MAGAZINE EXCHANGE
AMERICAN HEROES
BY LEFF
Wounded in the back by a shell fragment from heavy enemy submarine
fire, Charles Richardson, Able Seaman, Merchant Marine, went to the
rescue of two severely wounded Navy members when the abandon ship
order was given. During the rescue he defended himself and his helpless
companions from sharks. He was able to save one of the crew and himself.
Decrease the dangers of these men; buy War Bonds and hold ’em.
U. S. Treasury Department
that in. war time, hate is a neces
sity.
In order to fight a war we must
represent our enemies as murder
ers and menacing aggressors, as
suming that we are blameless.
Then, in order to carry the war to
a successful climax, we adopt the
same principles as the people we
are fighting. We must call them
animals, and we must become ani
mals ourselves.
To me, this assumption that
hatred can be donned or doffed at
will is quite illogical. Or, if hatred
can be thrown off like a cloak,
then I wonder if we hadn’t better
examine our war psychosis move
thoroughly. If, after a war, we de
cide that our enemies are human
beings after all, isn’t there reason
to believe that they may have been
human before and during the war
as well? And, if they are human,
why not treat them as such and
elevate our own status as well ?
HELEN LUVAAS
Globally Speaking
(Continued from page tiec)
In general, the new charter
avoids definitions and notably
omits any effort to define aggres
sion, or any insistence on the main
tenance of the status quo. It leaves
the security council free to decide
all cases in the light of circum
stances prevailing at the moment.
The new League would admin
ister the resettlement of the peo
ples driven from their homes by
the war. The world bank, under its
control, would loan the occupied
and devastated countries the money
necessary to get their economies
functioning.
We hope that the senate this
time will not sabotage our adher
ence to a world state that is out
only hope of prosperity and free- !
dom from future wars.
DANCING
Every Saturday Night
9 ’til 12
at the
EUGENE
HOTEL
with
ART HOLMAN
AND HIS
ORCHESTRA
in the
Persian Room
Join Your
Friends Here
Quick cafeteria-style service at
THE
BIG APPLE
Sinnott, Buell to Discuss
Economic Topic Sunday
Bill Buell and Bill Sinnott, sen
iors in liberal arts, will debate ti o
problem “Free Enterprise vs.
Planned Economy’’ at the West
minster forum, Sunday, October 2.',
at 6 p.m. at Westminster house.
All students and faculty are in
vited.
It is not true that most great
men rose from the ranks. Most mil
standing men in the past and pres
ent have come from well-to-do or
wealthy homes.
STOP IN
AND SEE US FOR 1
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Cor. 13th and Alder
"DOC’’ IRELAND, Prop.
Phone 2717
fTIfflM
"One Mysterious
Night"
with Chester Morris
Beneath Western.
Skies"
with Bob Livingston
McDonald
STARTING
"DRAGON SEED"
with
KATHARINE
HEPBURN
STARRING
JOAN DAVIS
in
"KANSAS CITY
KITTY"