Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, February 01, 1941, Page Two, Image 2

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    Oregon W Emerald
The Oregon Daily Emerald, published daiiy during the college year except Sundays,
Mondays, holidays, and final examination periods by the Associated Students, University
of Oregon. Subscription rates: $1.25 per term and $3.00 per year. Entered as second
class matter at the postoftice, Eugene, Oregon.
Represented tor national advertising by NATIONAL ADVERTISING SERVICE,
INC., college publishers’ representative, 420 Madison Ave., New York Chicago— Bos
ton—Los Angeles—San Francisco—Portland and Seattle.
LYLE M. NELSON, Editor JAMES W. FROST, Business Manager
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Hal Olney, Helen Angel!
Jimmie Leonard, Managing Editor
Kent Stitzer, News Editor
Fred May, Advertising Manager
Boh Rogers, National Advertising Mgr.
Editorial and Business Offices located on ground floor of Journalism building. Phones
3300 Extension: 382 Editor; 353 News Office; 359 Sports Office; and 354 Business
Offices.
Editorial Board : Roy Vernstrom, Pat Erickson, Helen Angell, Harold Olney, Kent
Stitier. Timmie Leonard, and Professor George Turnbull, adviser.__
Tipptrp BUSINESS STAFF
Anita Backberg, Classified Advertising
M anager
Ron Alpaugh, Layout Production Man
ager
TIPPER NE^
Bill Wailan, Circulation Manager
Emerson Page, Promotion Director
Eileen Millard. Office Manager
ys STAFF
Pat Erickson, Women’s
Editor
Bob Flavelle, Co-Sports
Editor
Ken Christianson, Co-Sports
Editor
Ray Schrick, Ass t Manag
ing Editor
rom Wright, Ass’t Manag
ing Editor
Betty Jane Biggs, Ass’t
News Editor
Corrine Wignes, executive
Secretary
Wes Sullivan, Ass’t News
Editor
Mildred Wilson, Exchange
Editor
To the Greatest Number
r^NB of the best statements of what should be the aim of
student government which we have come across is the
answer penned by a candidate in a Wisconsin student govern
ment examination. This candidate wrote:
“The aims of student government in my mind are to bring
social, cultural, and recreational opportunities to the great
est number of students possible. It secondly should express
campus opinion, reflecting in its policies the desires of the
students. It should under all circumstances keep the best
interest of the greatest number in mind.
“For the student leader it should provide wide, concrete
experience in efficient administration of government and
campus functions. It should be pliable enough that excep
tional managerial ability might find expression in activities
other than petty politics or ‘cut and dried, repetitious
administration of old existing functions.”
* * *
'TUIIS conception of student government is what the Emer
ald has been trying to promote this year—it is what
we believe is lacking in the present ASUO and class admin
istration.
In the first place student government is not bringing social
and cultural, and recreational opportunities to the greatest
number of students when it is excluding part of the students
from memberships — when it is allowing a minority who
possess power to control the affairs of the majority.
In class affairs, only those who have paid the “poll tax,
i. e., bought class cards, have the privilege of voices in class
elections or class affairs. How can student government pro
vide cultural and recreational opportunities tor the greatest
number when the greatest number is excluded?
* # •
JN the second place the present political system losters
“petty politics.” It is not providing any concrete expe
rience in efficient administration of government. It is pro
viding experience in a type of politics which is anything
but desirable. Student administration has been anything
but efficient this year—in many cases it has been downright
inefficient.
If training in efficient administration is ever to be received
it should be here in college. With a small and restricted
group the idea of looking at government as a chance to per
form a service for as many as possible rather than as a per
sonal quest for power should be cultivated.
Scholarship for Athletes
'JHIE terras of the newly-announced “Herbert Crombie
Howe Scholarship Fund’’ are resplendent with all the
humane qualities and interests which ought to be represented
in a tribute to the Oregon professor that the memorial hon
ors.
The Howe memorial, which is to provide an annual growing
fund to further the education each year of some worthy ath
lete who is forced to discontinue school because of an injury
making him unable to participate in sports, was announced
Wednesday by Mrs. llowe as a wish of the professor who
died last winter.
It is very right that the widow of Webfoot athletes’ great
est. friend should give the University a “living” gift, full
of all the appreciation and consideration for other human
beings that were the best-loved qualities of Herbert Howe.
It is right that the scholarship is to go preferably to a
football player each year, for that was really Professor
Howe’s favorite sport, lie liked to reminisce about his early
fascination for the game, remembering how he went out for
the team his first year at Cornell, was put on the sidelines
because he was too small, and “stayed there” as a devoted
fan. Until his health became too poor, he never missed a
football practice in his nearly two score years at Oregon.
# # #
JT is right that the memorial to a man like Herbert Howe
should express Ids interest in the people around him. He
was proud of the fact that lie knew every Oregon athlete
personally who played on University teams during his 2S
years as the school's athletic representative in Pacific coast
conferences.
It is right too that the fund established in memory of the
quick-thinking English professor whose green eyeshade vas
an Oregon institution, should be one that mellows and grows
with tiuic. For it is a fitting tribute to a man of human
qualities, who quaintly mixed a sincere enthusiasm for college
athletics, a love for English literature that brought the old
masters works to life for undergraduate minds, a mellow dis
cerning wit, and a genuine affection for life, in a combina
tion that has no duplicate. —11. A.
A good apple polisher is a person who knows how to laugh
at a joke that isu't funny.
“When are you going to put mj name in the paper'.'”
seems to be the query of a great number of students.
The alls
.<■ (Z
h -2. ' 0g do SOgZvt
to v ar.
K£ VOtyBY
WAS ORIGI MATED
BY MCGILL UNIVER
SITY STUDENTS
IN 1879/ Ji
PERPETUAL -STUDENT
W*. CULLEN BRYANT KEMP
ATTENDED CLASHES' AT COLUMBIA U.
FOR CVER. 20 YEARS. AFTER HIT
FRESHMAN TEAR IN 1868, THERE
WAS AN INTERLUDE IN HIS EDUCATION,
AT WHICH TIME he acquiesced TO HIS
FATHER'S WISHES' AND ENTERED BU5INESS-,
BUT ON HIT FATHERS DEATH HE
RETURNED To HIS STUDIES. HIT
LAST REGISTRATION WAT IN 1922/
z
BUCKSHOT
CORNELL U.
CLAIMS
TO BE THE
FIRST TRULY
NON- SECTARIAN
UNIVERSITY
IN THE
WORLD/
Biography in Crisis
By J. PARKE
William S. Knudsen, director
general of the office of produc
tion management for the na
tional defense program is a
man who not only wears a hat
at his desk so he can think bet
ter (so he says), but also an
executive who dislikes women
secretaries, since one burst into
tears at his language during a
conference. But that is not all.
“Bill” Knudsen stands at tho
top of those immigrants who
have distinguished themselves
in their adopted land—Ameri
ca.
William Knudsen's career be
gan early in his life and from
the bottom up. Apprenticed to
a bicycle factory in his native
Copenhagen, he created a sen
sation by building and riding
the first tandem ever seen in
Copenhagen. Coming to the
United States at the age of
twenty, Knudsen worked in New
York shipyards for a time and
then came to repair boilers in
a round house of the Erie rail
road. Soon he was appointed
stock room keeper.
Success came upon success.
In 1902, Knudsen became su
perintendent of a bicycle fac
tory in Buffalo, New York.
When that company was taken
over by Henry Ford in 1911,
William Knudsen became the
installer of assembly plants for
the entire country.
Wars are not new to the 62
yearjpld defense production
chief, how can they be to a
man of his age! In World War
I, Knudsen became Henry
Ford’s production manager but
resigned in the following years
over differences. It was then
that the General Motor’s Cor
poration took him over and gave
him the vice-presidency and
managership of Chevrolet cars.
His special job of building a
Chevrolet to outsell Ford’s
Model-T proved a success. The
year 1933 found Knudsen execu
tive vice-president with five
makes of cars to manage. In
1937 he was made president of
the General Motors Corpora
tion.
Feeling himself under obliga
tion to both workers and stock
holders during the United Au
tomobile workers’ strike in
1937, which closed 14 G.M.
plants, Knudsen let the matter
be settled by Governor Mur
phy of Michigan and with ap
parent fairness. To those who
would accuse him of having
used the speed-up system, he
replies that only accuracy pro
duces good work.
Genial, hard-working, and
democratic, William Knudsen, a
giant of six-feet-three, is loyal
to his native land. Few would
know that before 1914 his name
was Signius Wilhelm Poul.
From All Sides
Exchange by Mildred Wilson
A collection of a quarter of a
million beetles was recently do
nated to Harvard university by
Drj Henry C. Fall, Tyngsboro,
who spent 60 years amassing
the collection.
A teacher of physics and
chemistry, Dr. Fall captured
and classified the bugs as a
side hobby, and the collection
includes two North American
series each containing about
100,000 specimens, and 50,000
from foreign countries together
with several thousand butter
flies and moths.
—The Harvard Crimson.
* * *
Blue has replaced red as the
danger color for the poor male,
according to an article from
Indiana university. Girls who
are trying to get a man—or
keep the one they have aro
advised to sprinkle their ward
robe generously with navy
blue.
Eight men were hooked up to
a gadget called a psychometer.
Then they gazed upon gorgeous
models in colored dresses. It
was the laity in blue who made
their hands the clammiest, their
hearts the jumpiest.
The next most agitating col
ors were coral, beige, and green.
What happened to red? Nobody
knew.
—The Indiana Daily Student.
1 took her to a night club
I took her to a show
1 took her almost everywhere
A girl and boy could go.
t took her to swell dances
1 took her out to tea.
When all my dough wa,. gone.
I saw
She had been taking me.
—Oregon State Barometer.
The University of California
-• i.s l?^ - ana * v e r i ^ , 1
the fox hunt which was run re
cently to the delight of step-sit
ters. Instead of the traditional
fox, a motor bike-mounted mes
senger boy was out in front of
the pack, composed of a mixed
band of campus mongrels.
“The dogs don't bother me at
all," said the messenger. “My
motor makes more noise than
they do, and besides, they never
catch up with me.” The pack
refused to talk to reporters.
—The Daily Californian.
* * *
Henry Tatsumi, assistant pro
fessor of Japanese languages at
the University of Washington,
is the only person at the Uni
versity who »can operate their
very unportable Japanese type
writer. The carriage, 27 inches
long with a roller six inches in
diameter moves vertically and
horizontally over a yard square
galley, stopping as an unseen
lift picks up a single letter, inks
it and presses it hammer-Ukc
onto paper.
“1 can type 21 characters a
minute now," Tatsumi explained
P roudly as he laboriously
tracked down Chinese mono
syllabaries a n d transferred
them vertically to paper.
“There are from eight to nine
thousand characters at hand,"
the professor said, “but as a
rule I use only about five thou
said."—The University of Wash
ington Daily.
Early to bed—early to rise
Keeps your roommate from
wealing your ties. -The Y News
tBrigham Young University.)
Though Mitlsaps college is
supported by the Methodist
church, its Baptist union, only
denominational organization on
the campus, has a membership
of 10* out of a student body of
wright
or
wrong
With TOMMY WRIGHT
If SHAKESPEARE were alive
to read this, he would probably
rather be dead, what with our
“Much Ado About Nothing."
Most of our readers think it is
a "Comedy of Errors” but you
take it “As You Like It” for
“All's Well That Ends Well,”
we hope.
THIS WEEK . . .
Dear old SHAKEY takes an
other pounding from the “trite”
press as we do a little typify
ing.
Typical University of Oregon
coed: Much hair-do about noth
ing.
Coed’s idea of a good date:
All’s Well That Spends Well.
REBUKED . . .
By the Susie counterparts of
Oregon State’s Aggies for not
putting their names somewhere
in the columns of calamity. To
tell you the truth this isn’t a
daily edition of the Green
Goose and the ed censors this
stuff.
CAMPUS WHISPERS . . .
One Chysy has been taking a
beating for having his car rec
ognized more than once in the
Skinner park area—maybe his
frat brother JOE REIG could
help explain . . . another park
Angle appears when Phidelt
WALKER TREECE has a fog
light swiped from the night
popular Hendricks—you must
have been preoccupied MISTER
TREECE ... Of the gossip
hungry Susie gals, MURIEL
“MIN” STEVENS picks up one
of those third finger, left hand
deals . . . The pair of trousers
that got the leap year call was
MORRIS JACKSON . . . The
HERSCH PATTON - JANE
WEBSTER deal isn’t so pat,
’tis understood . . . MICKEY
MITCHELL of the Delta Gam
glams has CHUCK HAENER,
CLINT PAYNE, and WIL
FORD REYNOLDS doing a
mite of pharynx slitting ....
an answer — the WYCOFF
MILLS clique isn’t clicking —
and a Phi Sig named COLE
MAN moves in . . . you asked
for it — PAT McMAHON is
having trouble aplenty deciding
—to be decided: VERN SELLIN
or TOMMY ROBLIN . . . .
FRENCH of the ccon depart
ment almost made the 31st
deadline past leap year, but We
said "Almost”—The girl is a
hometown find . . . GRANNY
“CMC” McCORMICK visits the
campus. The reason — ANN
REYNOLDS.
CONCLUSION . . .
The deadline’s near
And you’d like to hear
That we are finished for today.
So long for a while.
Fifty-six major meetings
drew 59,000 persons to the Uni
versity of Illinois in the last
academic year.
International Side Show
By BXDGELY CUMMINGS
Most of the news about the
international situation that
came over the wire last night
was of an interpretative nature
dealing with
tno imminece oi
a German inva
sion of England,
and I don’t
thing my read
er (s) would find
it very interest
ing if I tried to
re - interpret
what the inter
Cummings preters think is
going to happen.
Most of the interpretation is
based on Hitler’s speech of the
other day so all you would have
to do is read it and draw your
own conclusions. It was ob
viously prepared for foreign
consumption anyway, with its
promises of "blue wonders’’ in
the way of military surprises, a
repetition of the Fuehrer’s faith
in Italy, and the threat of tor
pedoing all ships that appear
before the Nazi torpedo tubes.
His File
So in lieu of more interesting
topics I am forced to resort to
my desk drawer, where I have
stored various items in antici
pation of just such a contin
gency.
The first item is a paragraph
taken from a speech Premier
Antonescu delivered about two
weeks ago when Rumania was
in the throes of an Iron Guard
revolution. I saved it because I
think it is funny.
“I swear before God, the na
tion and history,’’ cried Anton
escu, "That my four months of
governing have been the most
successful, the most ferocious
and most soul destroying any
man could endure for his coun
try."
Not American
It may be just a mistake in
translation, but putting fero
cious and successful side Ly side
seems to give a penetrating in
sight into the way a European
ruler’s mind works. Certainly a
ferocious four months of gov
erning is not the American idea
of desirable.
As for the soul-destroying
part of Antonescu’s duties, it
sounds like the Rumanian lead
er would make a good candidate
for dne of Pat Erickson’s sad
eyed rulers. She's right when
she editorializes that these are
not times to gladden the hearts
of responsible men.
Somehing Wrong
Something is radically wrong
when there is so much intelli
gence, technical skill, culture,
and Christianity in the world
that the only way to solve prob
lems is for human beings to don
silly-looking uniforms and go
out to kill each other off in
wholesale lots.
Here’s another item, filed be
cause I didn’t understand it
very well and intended to do a
little research before springing
it. I haven't done the research
but if any reader wants to do
it for me I’ll be glad to print
it in this space (with the edi
torial board’s consent).
so be it...
By BELL FENDAUL
the custom of pedestrians using the sidewalks from University
street to Kincaid street and cars using Thirteenth street alongside
this walk is as turned around as a dentist saying “ahhh" . . .
the traffic along this walk between classes is clear out of propor
tion in relation to the size of the walk . . . it’s only a four-minute
walk from University to Kincaid as the OLD CROW dies, hut with
the pedestrian-traffic coming four-abreast there is a direct rise in
walking-time . . .
packed in like a spring term lunch basket, a sidewalk pedestrian
either circles in and out ot the
oncoming traffic or SUZY-Q's
through the crowd . . . some
prefer the hop-skip-jump-stop
go method . . .
what a bowler could do down
this sidewalk alley! . . .
the crowded condition along
this walk is that laundry that
shrinks human politeness . . .
for here is the area where “ex
cuse me” dies ami “who the
do you think you are" is taken
up. . . .
more glares are exchanged
here than over a bridge table.
in summarization, SO BE IT
would like to say the above facts
are as correct as bustles in
1SS0 . . . comma . . . dash . . .
period . . .
personal postscripts . . . .
GAM PHl's CAROLYN COL
LIER who is a lesson in sincer
ity and efficiency . . . the HUR
RELL-like pix of KAPPA DOR
OTHY HAVENS photoed bv
GEORGE GODFREY which is
so much in demand by—among
other — STAN ' c AVANAGH'
STAIGER . . . DELTA GAM
LIA EiUlA VERDURlffiN is
the campus memo that reminds
you that the feminine fig
ure can be very beautiful
. ... the NED SPARKS of
the campus — WALLY ROSS
MANN . . . TOMMY WRIGHT
whose head informs his type
writer what to say — and his
typewriter is very empty . . .
doll-like ADELE SAY . . . .
RUSS 1SELI, SAE, and MARY
JANE WORMSER, Pifi, steady
ing along . . . DELTA DEL D's
JEAN MORRISON'S conversa
tion is her autobiography . . .
JIM THAYER who is democrat
ic as C's on a report card . . .
JEAN WILCOX, phone 0i7,
with a personality beam that 13
continually lit up with a smile.
. . BARBARA rATTERSON,
JEEP girl, obviously ignoring
BRUCE McINTOSH . . . .
CHUCK GREEN who cooks up
his own statements and facts —
and then has to eat his own
words. . . answer persistent
BOB HERNDON . . - PROF
LKSCH, who. outside of being
an ENGLISH prof, ia really
quits normal. . . .
Indictment Filed
It seems that a federal grand
jury has been investigating bot
tlenecks in defense production.
The other day an indictment
was filed by this jury, charg
ing that American defense was
being impeded by restrictive
agreements between the Alum
inum company of America and
the German dye trust.
According to government
sources, Dow Chemical com
pany delivered magnesium to
German docks for 21 cents a
pound—including freight and
insurance — while charging 30
cents a pound with the freight
added to the bill in this coun
try.
The jurors found agreements
permitted Germany to obtain
four times as much magnesium
as has been available to the U.S.
on an annual basis.
These Indicted
Named in the indictments
were a flock of men and cor
porations which indicate a
world-wide tie-up of interlock
ing directorates. Here are some
of them: General Aniline and
Film corp. of New York, which
is assertedly controlled by the
German dye trust, which goes
by the high-powered name of
Interessengemeinschaft Farben
industrie Aktiengesellschaft of
Frankfort, Germany; the Alum
inum company of America; Ar
thur V. Davis, chairman of the
board; R. A. Hunt, president;
I. W. Wilson, vice-president;
other officers of Alcoa; the
American Magnesium corp., in
which Alcoa and General Ani
line have interests; the Mag
nesium Development corp., in
which Alcoa and I. G. Farbenin
dustrie have interests; and so on
and so forth.
Oregon ^Emerald
Saturday Advertising Staff:
Warren Roper, Sat. Adv. Mgr.
Norma Baker
Barbara Schmieding
Copy Desk:
Ray Schrick. city editor
Jean Eckley
Dorothea Cathcart
Lynn Johnson
Ruby Jackson
Bernie Engel
Night Staff:
Ted Goodwin, Night Editor
Don Butzin
Hunter Van Sicklen
Charlie Woodruff
Bob Frazier
J. G. Quick has been registrar
at the University of Pittsburgh
for more than 25 years.
University of Minnesota has
1,756 teachers on its academic
staff and 1,317 employes in the
various divisions of its non
academic staff.
i,
DRESS
for the
Informal
NEW
spring styles
are here
The flowing freshness
of Spring is here
1004 Will. St. Phone 633
Oregon (# Emerald
Classified Ads
Phone 3300—354
Room 5, Journalism Bldg.
READER ADS
Ten words minimum accepted.
First insertion 2c per word.
Subsequent insertions lc per word.
DISPLAY ADS
Flat rate 37c column inch.
Frequency rate (entire term) :
35c per column inch one time week.
34c per column inch twice or more a
week.
Ads will be taken over the telephone on a
charge basis if the advertiser is a sub
scriber to the phone.
Mailed advertisements must have sufficient
remittance enclosed to cover definite
number of insertions.
Ads must be in Emerald business office no
later than 6 p.m. prior to the day of in
sertion.
• Beauty Parlors
Eugene’s Most
Modern Shop
CITY BARBER
and
BEAUTY SHOP
855 Oak St. Phone 349
• Found
CLAIM at Depot, foot of Univer
sity street.
Book$:
1 Essay
3 Prose
2 Social Science
2 History of Europe
1 English Poets
3 Composition
1 Physics
1 Psychology
1 Reporting
2 English Essentials
3 Literature
5 Looseleaf Notebooks
8 Notebooks
Miscellaneous
1 String of pearls
2 Rings
Kerchiefs
Cloves
3 Purses
1 Slide Rule
12 Pens
5 Eversharp3
1 Debate Pm
1 Pledge Pm
3 Girls' hats
3 Boys' Hats
7 Umbrellas
1 Overcoat
1 Leather Jacket
1 Slicker
1 Raincoat
• Magazines
Don’t Forgot to
Send Valentines
Get them at
MAGAZINE EXCHANGE
128 E. 11th
• Specialist
CHA ^UEW
CHINESE HEBB CO.
Herb Specialist. Ueflnlte
relief against all diseases
and chronic male, fe
male, and children ail
ments. 30 yr. experience.
Price reasonable. Free
I TL tO
MtMMiMmiuMiiauun. nuurs iu a.
6 p.m. wkdays. Sun. 10-2. 935 Oak
This Ad
Brought Results . .
• Lost
STRING of small pearls
on chain. Reward. Bet
ty Keller, Phone 11200.
SHE FOUND
HER PEARLS
through the
Oregon Emerald
Classifieds
Call 3300 - 354
or Bring T hem
to
Rm. 5, Journalism