Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, April 24, 1930, CAMPUS EDITION, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    DEANS TO MAKE'
AUNTS
Summer Cruise Ships To Be
Inspected by Deans.
RESERVATIONS ARE OPEN
Faculty Members of Sessions Are
Listed; Original Quota
Is Exceeded.
Alfred Powers, dean of the ex
tension division, and Kail W. On
thank, executive secretary of the
University, will leave for Seattle,
Saturday, April 26, to make final
arrangements for an Inspection of
the S. S. Kogers, the ship which
is chartered to take the second
annual University post-session
(Aug. 4-26) to Alaska.
From Seattle, Dean Powers and
Mr. Onthank will go on to Van
couver, B. C., there to check up
on the S. S. Niagara, the big ship
of the Royal Australasian Mail
Line which has been chartered for
the University of Oregon summer
cruise to Hawaii. This cruise will
take from June 24 to August 16,
a total of 53 days with 38 days on
the island.
Class Rooms To Bo Placed.
A check-up pf berths will be
made, so they may be assigned,,
and class rooms will be inspected
and worked out on both ships.
The S. S. Niagara will take only
one more trip before it will leave
on the Hawaiian cruise.
Although the quotas originally
allowed for each cruise have al
ready been filled, students who
wish to go to either Alaska or
Hawaii and have not as yet secur
ed reservations may yet do so.
This is because, Dean Powers says,
the large Canadian boat secured
will provide a larger number of
reservations to Hawaii than were
previously announced; and berth
space on the Rogers to Alaska
will enable a few more additional
students to be accommodated on
that cruise also.
More Reservations Open.
Accordingly, states Dean Pow
ers, any students who wish reser
vations on either of these sum
mer tours should send them in
immediately to the extension di
vision.
The faculty for the Hawaiian
trip will be: Karl W. Onthank, di
rector in charge; Dr. Warren D.
Smith, professor of geology; Dr.
Ralph D. Casey, professor of jour
nalism; Dr. Nelson L. Bossing,
professor of education; and Mrs.
Mable Holmes Parsons, professor
of English.
Among the faculty for the Alas
kan tour will be: Prof. W. G. Beat
tie, director in charge; A. R.
Sweetser, professor of bojany;
Nowland B. Zane, professor of art;
and Dr. Charles N. Reynolds, pro
fessor of sociology at Stanford
university. Additional members
will be announced by Dean Pow
ers later.
KING WINS IN CONTEST
Continued From Firwt Page
lie Dunlap, of Portland, on "inde
pendence for India”; Don Saun
ders, of Eugene, on "Compulsory
Military Training”; and Robert
Gamer, of Salem, on "Social Race
Equality." Tim Booth, of Leba
non, spolte on "The Suppression of
Birth Control Literature," and
Kenneth Campbell, of Eugene, on
"Recognition of Russia.”
Burt Brown Barker, vice-presi
dent of the University, and donor
of the award, acted as chairman.
Easton Rothwell, of the Univer
sity high school faculty; Eugene
V. Slattery, assistant district at
torney of Lane county; and Don
Husband, Eugene attorney, were
judges.
LEAP WEEK - END OPENS
__Continued From First Pago
sounding dance scheduled for to
night at the Delta Gamma soror
ity house. Stags, both men and
women, will start arriving at 8:30.
All tagging and asking for dances
will be done by the women and
for once the men can see how it
feels to be a wallflower. Maria
Wilson is arranging for the “Re
venge" and urges that everyone
wear campus togs, to get that in
formal, friendly feeling. The party
will break up at 10:30.
WEEK-END PLANS OUT
__Continued From First Fukc
not vet been chosen.
All University classes scheduled
for Friday afternoon and Satur
day morning will be dismissed,
Hugh Biggs, acting dean of men,
declared. This will enable stu
dents to attend all Junior Week
end events.
Flirting Upheld.
The co-eds at Willamette col
lege insist that flit ting is the pride,
heritage, and ambition of every
woman. The college campus is a
good place, they declare - one
wants some pleasant memories of
college life.
MEN PUT AT MERCY OF
WOMEN FOR WEEK-END
Senior Leap Week Opens Today with Kappa Koffee at Four;
GlasS’Jenkins Marriage Announced
Today the events toward which
the men of the campus look for
ward to for four years will take
place. The senior women will en
tertain the men and pay the bills.
The Kappa Coffee, which is a date
affair, will be held at the Kappa
Kappa Gamma house. Naomi Hoh
man is chairman. In the evening
the significantly named “Coed’s
Revenge’’ will take place at the
Delta Gamma house with Maria
Wilson in charge. It is a strictly
no-date affair. Both events are
informal. Both are for seniors.
* ♦ *
The announcement of the mar
riage of Eleanore Glass, ’28, to
Mark Jenkins, ex-’31, is of interest
to campus people. The ceremony
took place November 17, but was
not announced until a few days
ago at LaGrariHe, Oregon, where
Mrs. Jenkins is a member of the
high school faculty. She is affil
iated with Pi Beta Phi and Mr.
Jenkins is a member of Psi Kappa.
* * *
Chi Delta Sorority entertained
with a formal tea at the chapter
house yesterday afternoon in hon
or of Mrs. Mary Dumble, of Los
Angeles, national inspector of
Beta Phi Alpha, Mrs. Warren D.
Smith, patroness, and Miss Mar
garet L. Dalgh, house mother.
Miss Ruth Clark was chairman of
arrangements.
* * *
Theta Omega sorority will en
tertain with a tea dance Saturday
afternoon from 2:30 to 5:00 at the
chapter house. Patronesses will
be Mrs. John Hershner and Mrs.
Earle M. Pallett. Miss Mildred
French is in charge of the affair.
The juniors of Zeta Tau Alpha
will entertain the seniors at an in
formal dinner dance Friday eve
ning, April 24. Spring flowers
will be the decoration motif. Na
dine Gilkeson and Dorothea Good
fellow are in charge of arrange
ments.
* • *
Pi Beta Phi sorority will hold
their annual Founder’s Day break
fast at the chapter house Sunday
morning at 9:30. Alumni of the
chapter will be guests. Afterwards
all will attend church in a group.
RADIO PROGRAM IS PLAN
i
DR. SPEARS SLATED TO TALK
AFTER CHARITY GAME.
Political Night Features Today’s
Broadcast; Short Speeches
To Be Delivered.
Political candidates, their his
tories, plums and promises will be
broadcast tonight over KORE at
8 o’clock in the “Emerald of the
Air’s" "Politicians Night,” ac
cording to Art Potwin, director.
The whole evening, however, will
not be turned over to lengthy
speeches or political harranguing,
but^will feature some of the best
campus musical talent yet to be
presented. “Flint” Fowler’s har
mony orchestra is slated to pre
sent 20 minutes of syncopated or
chestration.
Alpha Phi Trio, Carolyn Haber
lach, Flavel Hayner, and Gladys
Foster, are scheduled to sing sev
eral numbers. They have been
heard frequently before, at cam
pus fynotions, and will prove one
of the main attractions of the
program.
Bob Guild, popular soloist, ac
companied by Maxine Glover at
the piano, will sing several num
bers. “Guilfin and His Gal,” con
tinuity stunt, will return again to
night in their fifth episode, which
Slug Palmer, assistant director,
promises to be the best yet. The
two college lovers and their trou
bles have been receiving a lot of
interest and applause from radio
audiences.
As an added attraction to next
week’s program, Carolyn Haber
lach, recently added to the broad
cast directorate, promises a va
riety of April Frolic talent. John
ny Robinson’s “Varsity Vaga
bonds” will also play on several
nights, according to Potwin.
Dr. Clarence W. Spears, varsity
football coach, will speak over the
microphone after the Community
Chest football game on May 10,
according to Slug Palmer. The
subject of Dr. Spears’ talk has not
yet been announced, but undoubt
edly it will be on the varsity foot
ball team and its prospects for
the 1930 football season.
STUDENT VOTES ARE HIT
Continued From First Paso
was brought under fire during a
municipal election campaign. At
that time the Register reassured
the students, when threats of in
dictment were hinted at, as to
their right of voting in the local
election as follows: “The student
should lose no sleep over prosecu
tion for illegal voting if he has
resided in Lane county 90 days,
the precinct 30 days and the state
6 months. No court has ever as
sisted in the disfranchising of a
single man's vote. If the student
I voted without having gained that
I right, that is another matter. . .
In the fall elections of 192S the
question of student vote was
again raised during the campaign
against the Sunday movie law. In
this campaign the Eugene Federa
tion of Chur c h Brotherhoods
threatened to protest the election
results in case of the defeat of
their cause. As matters turned
out, the Sunday movie law was
smothered under such a landslide
of votes that nothing further was
I done about the student vote.
The distinction between the
present right of students to vote
here in Eugene and the previous
occasions, according to Ralph Mill
sap, senior in journalism who has
just finished a research in this
field, is the sworn affidavits of
students given to the census takers
wherein they have given their
permanent address as elsewhere
than Eugene.
MILLIGAN WINS TITLE
Ruhenstein Defeated in Ping-Pong
Tourney; Co-op (Jives Cup.
In the hotly contested final
match of the annual Y. M. C. A.
ping pong tournament yesterday,
Max Ruhenstein, defending cham
pion, fell before the onslaught of
Scott Milligan, who will receive
the trophy offered by the Co-op.
The score was 1-6, 4-6, 13-11, 8-6,
6-4.
Ruhenstein played well to take
the first two sets without much
trouble, but began a losing streak
in the third set, when Milligan's
swift serve was too much for him.
Until this match Ruhenstein had
a record of never having been de
feated in tournament play.
LAST DIME CRAWL SOON
Event To Be Hfld Wednesday for
Foreign Scholar Fund.
The last Dime Crawl of the year
has been scheduled for next Wed
nesday, April 30, Florence McNer
ney, foreign scholarship chairman
| for Associated Women Students,
revealed yesterday. As is a cus
tom, women’s living organizations
will hold open house from 6:30 to
7:30, during which time the men
will pay but a modest dime to
dance ten minutes or an hour, ac
cording to their preference. Com
mittees for the affair will be an
nounced at the first of the week,
Miss McNerney said.
Air Display Planned.
An aeronautical display, the
first in the history of the school,
is being planned by the Univer
sity of Cincinnati.
DR. J. R. WETHERBEE
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Office Phone 1601
Residence 12S0-M
801-2-8 .(liner Bldg
Eugene, Oregor
FREE...
With every pur
chase of one-half
gallon or 4 pounds
of Johnson Wax—
free use of the
Johnson De Luxe
Electric Moor Pol
isher for one day.
AUTISTIC PICTURE
FRAMING
Ludford’s
PAINT—WALL PAPER
ART GOODS
55 West Broadway
Phone 748
FOUR BRAVE MUD
ROADS ON SURVEY
Educators Travel Miles To
Visit Schools.
HUFFAKER HEADS WORK
Graduate Students Tour County
To Inspeet Buildings of
Outlying Communities.
Great practical benefit to edu
cators is expected to result from
the survey now being- conducted
by Dr. C. L. Huffaker, of the
school of education, in Lane and
Klamath counties.
Comparison of school systems in
these two counties is being made
because Klamath has had the
county unit plan for several years,
while Lane county operates under
the old system. The survey is ex
pected to show up weaknesses in
both systems, and will probably
result in some consolidations of
schools in Lane county.
Lane Schools Visited
Starting last fall, Dr. Huffaker
assisted by several graduate stu
dents, visited every school in Lane
county it was possible to reach
during the rainy season. This
week such an investigation will
be started in Klamath county.
Each grade and high school visit
ed was rated according to its
building, equipment, number of
students, subjects taught and
number of teachers. The students
were tested, and were located in
the district with reference to the
school, and to the roads which led
to the school.
Because of the mountainous
character of much of Lane county
many of these schools were inac
cessible except by Toot. A num
The
Famed
"Oregon m i s t” de
mands frequent shoe
shines. And “Ted” has
arranged it so that the
special ticket rate
cards are good until
summer.
10 Shines $1.00
5 Shines .50
Two-tone shoes are
shined for 25c, or two
punches on a ticket.
CAMPUS
SHOE SHINING
PARLOR
“Ted Pleases Everybody”
Across l'rom Sigma Chi
THEODORE RADIOS
The
Week-end
Senior Leap Week, and
all those dates you
have been anticipat
ing! Be sure to have
the car all primed and '
ready to go at a ,mo
ment’s notice. Get gas
and oil at the Oregon
Service Station, and
prepare to enjoy your
self.
OREGON
Service Station
ber of these hazardous trips were
made by the four graduate stu
dents assisting Dr. Huffaker, Irv
ing Mather, Leslie Godard, Buford
Wilkerson, and Paul Menegat. '
These four went as far as they
could by automobile, and then
traveled on foot through mud and
water. If the wet spring continues,j
it is possible that a few of the
schools cannot be reached until \
after the term is out, Dr. Huffa-1
ker said.
While no definite classifications
have as yet been determined, Dr.
Huffaker stated that they had
found wide ranges of standards in :
the schools and very few average
schools. They were either very j
good or very poor.
Results of this investigation will
be published some time during the
summer.
MRS. WICKHAM HIGHESTi
Continued From First Pa*re
Williams, 90; Arthur Alne, 87T
Constance Boardwell, 87; LaWan
da Fenlason, 85; Wm. McNabb,
85; John Finley, 84; Phyllis Hart
zog, 84; Merle Harrison, 84; Mar
garet Cummings, 83 1-2; Janet
Perry, 83; Bernice Woodard, 83;
Mary Caniparoli, 83; Lester Beck,
83; Rodney Irwin, 82; Lewis Fen
drich, 82; Jesse Douglas, 82; Edith
Winestone, 82; Mrs. Gwendolyn
Hayden, 82; Marguerite Hunt, 82;
Edward Kottoe, 81; Herbert Do
ran, 81; Marjorie Halderman, 81;
Harriet Myer, 81; Thomas Winn,
80; David Wilson, 80; Donald
Saunders, 80; Ralph Hill, 80; Janet j
Fitch, 80; Dorris Hardy, 80; Elma
Havemann, 80; Celene Lauterstein,1
80; Ida Markusen, 80; Maxine
Moore, 80; Helen Raitanen, 80.
DeNeffe’s
For
Tuxedos
And
All the Other
Trimmings
Are You Ready
for Friday
and Saturday?
TUXEDOS
FOR RENT
DeNeffe’s
Men’s Dress Wear
PICNICS!
When ready for that
big picnic, come
down and let us put
up one of our special
lunches.
A Fresh Strawberry Sundae
CO-BP BOARD TO SELECT
NOMINATIONS OF DIRECTING
BODY SLATED MONDAY.
Annual Meeting Called for in
Constitution; Year’s Work
To Be Reported.
Nominations for three new
members of the Co-op board will
take place next Monday afternoon
at 4 o’clock in room 105, Com
merce, according to Day Foster,
president of the board.
At this time the year’s report of
business will be given and those
who are to make nominations are
asked to be present at the meet
ing. Since this is the annual meet
ing called for in the constitution
of the University of Oregon Co
operative Store, all students are
invited to attend, and make nom
inations.
The officers who are retiring
from the board are: Day Foster,
president: Bradshaw Harrison and
Esther Kaser. Two students, Ken
EYES EXAMINED!
Ten years’ successful prac
tice In Eugene.
LENSES GROUND!
In our own modern lens
grinding laboratory.
GLASSES FITTED!
By us personally. A com
plete service in one
establishment.
Dr«Ro^al Qick
OPTOMETRIST
921 IDillamelte St., Eugene
dall Newport and Ted Park will
col tinue to serve on the board
next year.
There are two junior members
and one sophomore on the board,
and this necessitates nominating
two men or women from the soph
omore class and one man or wjo
man frem the freshman class. The
junior members serve for two
years and the sophomore mem
ber for one year.
Infirmary Houses Five.
Thelma Kem is still at the in
firmary, with three new patients,
Lionel Lane, Bill East, and Don
Guild.
TAYLOR U.-DRIVE SYSTEM
ATTENTION STUDENTS
Talk to us about our new low rates
Late Model Graham Paige
Call 2185 Coupes and Sedans 857 Pearl St
iiiiiiiiiiii!i!i.!i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitii!iitiiiiiiiiiiiimtiiiiiiiiiiii
NEXT SUNDAY
11:00 A. M.
“What Man Will Do for Gold and the
Problems Created”
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
CLAY E. PALMER, MINISTER
Where Christian Liberalism Is Preached
Spring Fever Special
One of these
books will do
wonders for
that restless
feeling. Try
one.
The Door
42nd Parallel
Journey’s End
Car of Croesus
Seductio ad Absurdum
Why Murder the Judge
15c
From
Thursday
Until
Monday
THE “HIGH HAT” LIBRARY
the
UNIVERSITY “CO-OP”
Senior Leap Week
and
Mortar Board Ball
Co-Eds
When you get your man, cinch him with a fine Gardinia
buttonaire for the formal dinner. We have made arrange
ments to have unlimited quantities, and quality goes
without saying if it comes from
The University Florists
598 13th, East
Phone 654
WHY are Kellogg’s Corn Flakes the most
popular ready-to-eat cereal in the world?
Matchless flavor is the answer!
Just pour milk or cream into a brim
ming bowl of these crisp and golden flakes
tomorrow. An ideal dish to enjoy late at
night. Delicious and easy to digest.
Ask your fraternity house steward or
your favorite campus restaurant to serve
Kellogg’s—the original Corn Flakes.
The moit popular cereals served
in the dining-rooms of American
colleges, eating clubs and fra
ternities are made by Kellogg
in Battle Creek. They include
ALL-BRAN, Pep Bran Flakes,
Rice Krispies, Wheat Krumbles,
and Kellogg's Shredded Whole
Wheat Biscuit. Also Kaffee Hag
Coffee—the coffee that lets
you sleep.
f
CORN FLAKES,
I