Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, March 06, 1929, Page 3, Image 3

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    Bill Reinhart
To Speak On
Casaba Rules
Hoop Changes Subject
Of Feattn*e Talk for
A. S. tJ. O. Broadcast
Belt Trio Furnishes Music
Specialty Over KOBE
Hill Riiuhart, varsity basketball
and baseball eoaeli, will be the
leading speaker at the weekly radio
program 1) r o a d
east Friday night
at 8 o Vlcok over
KOHE by °thc|
Oregon Profes-j
sional Sport Writ- |
nrs’ association.;
Reinhart will talk !
on the reeouinien-J
dation for chftng
Vs in the hoop
rules advised by
the Pacific coast!
coaches.
the talk by I
Reinhart will be
Bill Reinhart a feature of the j
45-m i n 111 e pro- j
gram conducted every Friday night
by the associated students of the
University of Oregon in con,junc
tion with the Professional Sports
Writers’ association. The program
will start at 8 o’clock. Sain Wild-j
crinan, who is in charge, will give '
a brief sports resume.
A fine musical program also has I
been arranged. It will introduce '
the Delt Trio over the air. Maurice I
Kinney, Bob McAlpin and Bob |
Holmes will sing, accompanied by
Bob Keeney on the banjo.
Bast Friday Ed Abercrombie,
swimming and tennis coach, was
the speaker, and the Kappa Sigma
Trio furnished the entertainment.
Arden X. Pangborn, president of
the Sports Writers’ association, will
be master of the ceremonies.
Dean Powers Compiles
‘The Alaska Boatman’
Information in Regard to
Alaska Given in Booklet
A sum 11 pamphlet tailed! “The
Alaska Boatman” has been compiled
and written by Alfred Powers, dean
of the extension division. Inquiries
have been received from sixteen
states asking for information re
garding the Alaskan tour to lie
fostered by the university next
summer from August 7 to August
L’l. This pamphlet will be published
occasionally bv the summer session
of the university and sent to those
planning to enroll in the summer
school to Alaska.
Prospective summer school stu
dents want to know what they
should wear on the trip, how long
the boat will stop at Virtorhi, what
courses 'are added and how the
credits will lie arranged. Bean
Powers answers all these questions
and will answer more in the next
issue of the pamphlet.
Old Oregon Will Give
Prize for Best Joke
Book Editor Offers Silver
Dollar for Contribution
Miss Jeanette Calkins, editor of
Old Oregon, has announced a pl'i/.e
of one silver dollar for the best
joke submitted to the Old Oregon
office for the March issue. Humor
ous poems, skits, and Sketches will
be accepted, but straight jokes, es
pecially ones with local color, will
be preferred. Helen Daugherty
(Mrs. Harris) Ellsworth is in charge
of the humor section, Lemon Punch.
The feature of the March number
of "the Old Oregon, will be an article
on the merger of the Oregon and
Oregon State college Boards of re
gents. Professor Bunn will have a
humorous story, supposedly true.
An effort will be made to publish
the magazine by the last uf the
week.
REX
TODAY
THURS.
i
“THE
WRECK”
with
SHIRLEY
. MASON
Mini
MALCOLM
McGregor
FKI. and SAT.
hu the stuye
MANHATTAN
PLAYERS
NOVEL-T
“Halstead
Street’’
Matinee and Nile
Oregon Ranks High Among Colleges
Of Nation In New Teaching Methods j
Many Schools Changing
Systems, Says Sheldon
That a general overhauling of
teaching methods is under way in
at least half of the nation’s col
leges and that the University of
Oregon’s activities in this field
are getting more recognition than
those of any other Pacific coast
institution were observations made
yesterday by Dean H. D. Sheldon,
of the school of education, who re
turned Sunday night from Cleveland
where lie attended a national meet
ing of educators.
There is a general interest all
over the United States for reform
in college teaching. Apparently
about half the colleges in the coun
try, lint simply the state institu
tions, but all types of schools, are
experimenting and reorganizing
their methods, declared the dean.
"‘The work donV, as represented
by the study of present methods
and introduction of the lower and
upper division plan, under Dr. A.
B. Hall’s program, were referred to
at a number of the meetings. It is
noticeable that we are getting more!
attention than any other Pacific
coast school, either because we have,
done more or let it be known more,”
he went on. I
Dean Sheldon was one of a com-1
mittee appointed at the session of
teachers of education to study the,
present state histories of education, i
A half day was devoted to it and;
it was decided that an entirely new
series of histories should be' pub
lished, as the present ones are out
of-date and written before the mod
ern
scholarship standards werej
worked out.
Dr. Stuart G. Noble, uf<Tulane,
uiliveisitv, New Orleans, is chair
man of the committee. Dean Shel
don represented Oregon, Washington
and Nevada; and Dr. John Almack,
now of Stanford university and for
merly director of the extension
bureau here, is the other coast dis
trict representative.
baring his trip Dean Sheldon en
joyed visits with a number of men
formerly associated with the uni
versity. Dr. G. A. Gregory, a pro
fessor in the school of administra
tion about five years ago, now of j
Cinciunatti, Dr. Homer 1. Rainey,
who is president of Franklin col
lege, Indiana, and who left here
about a year and a half ago, Dr.
Harl Douglass, who is now in Penn
sylvania on an exchange professor-1
ship from Oregon, were among the
instructors lie saw. Former Oregon
graduates the dean exchanged
greetings with included Gilen M.
Ruch, who finished about 1!H7 and
is now teaching at the University
of California, arid Enos Keezel, who
obtained his master’s degree here
about 191t> and is now secretary of
the Chicago Principal Y club.
He stopped in Madison, Wiscon
sin, to visit Ralph Casey, Oregon
journalism professor who is making
a brilliant record. as a political
science instructor, he says, and Kim
ball Young, who taught here about
six years, leaving about three years
ago, and who according to the dean '
is rapidly coining to the front as a |
leader in sociology, lie will teach j
in New York this summer.
Malcolm Medler* Blind Piano Student,
Shows Wonderful Musical Ability
\
i
By ALICE GORMAN
Congratulations to Mrs. Jane
Timelier and Malcolm Medler—to
Mrs. Timelier for the extraordinary
work that she has drihe and to Mal
colm Medler fot the splendid and
pleasing way in which he has res
ponded to her efforts. Last even
ing’s recital at the music auditor
ium was. a source of wonder and
praise to the many who heard it.
The program was well selected, and
in places very difficult, but beau
tifully done. The thing that can be
said of Malcolm Medler’s playing
is that it is his medium of express
ing himself, and that is not a mere
superficial statement—Mr. Medler
is a person with emotions, deep feel
ings and an accute sensitiveness, all
of which lie displays in his playing.
Bach’s Prelude and Fugue in D
Major was the first number and
showed a well defined theme anil
good rhythm. The Beethoven Fur
Flise followed and was an improve
ment even over the first number in
the tone qualities. It was a direct
contrast to the Fttgue being simple*
but necessitating an easy, light
touch which Mr. Melder displayed,
and a clearly defined melody which
was beautifully brought out with
a singing, happy quality. With the
Gavotte of Gluck-Brahuis Mr. Med
ler gained more confidence and play
ed it with a lilting lightness that
was eharniing. The Gavotte was
the favorite of the first three num
bers.
The Grieg was an achievement!
There was a delightful niceness
about the individual notes and the
spirit of the thing was there. The
finale, molto ellegro Was especially
$ 'ItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllirllllllllllllllllllllHIIIllllllllllINfllllOllllllillilllllllllll1' g
1 REMEMBER
THAT ... . I
* i
are members
VfP
\%rists Td&pujhMknh
S^ALL on us when you
, wish to send flowers
ely toany distant point.
Our dependable F T D
service insures that the
same quality flowers you
order will be delivered to
its destination quickly
and economically.
il ibiliiJItMws
University Florist
CUT FLOWERS
AN1J PLANTS
noteworthy for the fine shadings |i
in it.
Tile third group began with Schu
bert’s Impromptu in B Flat. Schu- ■
belt’s appeal is universal, and Mal
colm Medlar put all the traditional
feeling into it. The Caprice Vien
i nois (Kreisler) was lovely for the
song in it. Kreisler should have
been pleased to hear that interpreta
tion.
The last number was Chopin's
Ballade in F Minor—a most diffi
cult thing to play, and splendidly
done, especially for the variations |
of tones. Altogether it was a pleas
ing recital.
There are no words adequate to
express the credit due to Mrs. Jane
Thacher who has worked faithfully
and so intensely with Mr. Medler.
11 is playing has reached a maturity
hardly thought of a year ago when
Mr. Medler came t/i Mrs, Thacher
for lessons, and has developed
through her painstaking effort.
>_
Physics Forum Holds
First Meeting of Term
Fifteen Members Discuss
Problems* Play Games
The Physics forum, composed Of
senior and graduate students in
physics, and members of the physics
staff, met for the first time this
LAST
Showing
Tonight
No Advance
■ in Prices
I'HOOIPH 7UKOB J
JtSSE L. LASKV c
prKOpuc r/o/v |
The Patriot
FLORENCE VIDOR
LEWIS STONE
NEIL HAMILTON
j C paramount picture
! coming Tomorrow
“FOUR SONS”
One oi the In Rest Pictures
Maiie Lust Year
term at tlie home of A. E. Caswell,
professor of physics, on Monday at
8:15, for a social even in cr.
The purpose of the society is to
meet and discuss practical problems
in physics, and the meeting held
Monday night, at which about 15
members were present, combined
business with pleasure, as games
which had application to physics
were played, as well as problems
discussed.
The society has not conducted its
regular monthly meetings this term
because of the fact that the 'mem
bers have been too closely confined
to their work, but it is hoped that
meetings will be held more regu
larly spring term.
Hubert Yenrion, graduate student,
is president of the organization;
Carl Hansen, senior, vice president;
and Beatrice Mason, graduate stu
dent, secretary.
Cheers and Hisses
Greet Initial Showing
Of Screen Aspirants
By C. H.
Are college men better looking
than college women.’ Yes, but their
pars flap.
At least that is the verdict of
the “Campus Movie” tryout reels !
shown for the first time last night !
n Villard hall to those heroes and
I
heroines who had their pictures
aken.
As the reels were shown, the
l'owd hissed and booed and clapped
ml hollered. In the back of the
•oom, a college widow with Cleo
mtra hair held court. She was
lressed in red.
All the glamor of college life
hat you see in the lmnest-to-good
less movies.
There were two characters that
food out preeminently: a co-ed
vitli the most pathetic, looking face
hat ever a child who had been
(eaten and starved could have (she
night have been Diane, the sweet
leart of the “sewer rat” in
‘Seventh Heaven”) and a man
ooking like Thomas Mcighan as a
sainted sinner.
As a rule, the men were much
more at ease and much more na
tural before the camera. Their fea
tures tobk better; possibly because
they were large and most of the
girls looked too thin.
In several of the reels the light
ing was poor and faces were barely
distinguishable. In some instances
the light caught on gleaming eye
| balls and made them look like
I searchlights. Far from attractive.
Union Pacific Offers
St'holarships at W.S.C.
WASHINGTON STATE COL
LEGE, Pullman, March .1.—(PIP)—
Eight Washington high school stu
dents interested in either agricul
ture or home economics have been
awarded $100 scholarships to the
state college of Washington by the
Union Pacific railway, it was an
nounced today. The winners were
chosen on the basis of interest
shown in agriculture or home eco
nomics, scholarship and character. |
SIGN IN CASH STORE
“Your face may be good, but we
can’t put it in the cash register.”
“T can’t get into my shoes.”
“Whit? Swelled feet, too?”-*
Selected.
E V - ■ :
I .
OUR NESTLE
I PERMANENT WAVE I
Water Wave, 50c
Finger Wave, 50c
Marcel, 75c
Manicure, 50c
( L. & R. BEAUTY SHOP |
_ Next to Kcnnell-Ellis
^iiiwiiaiiiiaiiaiiiiHiniiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiaiiHia^
DURING VACATION—
Leave yotir wateli or jewelry to lie re
paired. Reasonable eliarges. All work
guaranteed.
^1
The patented BULOVA
Duit-Tite protectee
M
-Down
-Per Week
Priced $24.75 up to $50
H. D. SMARTT
Kitty-corner from U. S. National Bank
See Our Window
OF
Athletic Pictures
i ■ .
It would be mighty nice to turn over
the pages of your Oregon albutn some
years hence and see grinning or glow
ering up at you a picture of one of the
t school’s outstanding athletes or a gang
of your former teammates.
Get these pictures here—two prices
30c and 50c
Pictures uJ' groups and singles swimming,
golf, track, football, and tennis—enough for all
of you.
University Pharmacy
The Students’ Drug Store
Y. W. Leaders
Announced at
Annual Bam]net
Free Thcinp Is Carried
Out in Decorations,
Prograriis a n d Toasts
At the annual membership banquet
of tliu V. \V. G. A. held last 11 i>• Itt
at Lee Duke’s rafe, the names of
Members of the cabittet for the
following year were announced.
Besides the elected officers, Lid
ress .ludd, president; Gracia Hag
gerty, vice-president; Helen Chaney,
secretary; Kutli Johnson, treasurer,
the following will compose the now
cabinet:
Daphne Hughes, vespers; Dorothy
Hallin, frosh commission advisor;
Betty Hughes, religious education;
Dorothy Jones, staff direct*)!'; Lornn
Rnnev, office; Florence Jones, ser
vice; interchurch, Leone Barlow;
finance, Margaret Me Knight; Mar
ion Pattullfl, conferences; Mildred
McUee, world fellowship; Dorothy
Shaw, membership; Margaret Ed
munson, division representative;
and Lois Nelson, frosli commission
president.
Margaret. Kdmunson, retiring
president of the Y, W. ('. A., acted
as tonstmistress for ^the banquet
which was formal. The theme, of
the banquet was trees, and the dec
orations, programs and toasts were
centered around this.
Toasts were given by Margaret
Kdnuinson, Mrs. George 1’. Winch
ell, Miss Dorothy V. Thomas, And
Kldress .ludd. Margaret Wharton
sang "Trees.”
Gracia Haggerty was in olmrge of
the arrangements for the banquet.
She was assisted bv Dorothy Shaw,
I who had charge of the deebratiorts;
j Leotle Harlow, programs; and
i Blanehe Griggs, tickets.
The Chicago gangster’s cry:
"Don’t shoot until you can sec the
hack of his neck!”
j Ladies Felt Hats
! Dyed - $P<>
&ted#tc
Cfconm
PHONB
300
!
H
E
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YOUR LAST OPPORTUNITY TO SEE
“WHV MEN LEAVE HOME”
TONIGHT
COMING THURSDAY
TAYLOR PLAYERS
IN
THE Cat the Canary
A GREAT MYSTERY COMEDY DRAMA
H
E
I
L
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ADULTS '
50c
All Broadway Shows
Please cion’I bo mislead by
our prices
Jk
Children
10c
AWttlh
- -Petite NANCY CA.H
nOLli sings ami donees
lie r way through this
sparkling comedy drama
oft love-loving ladies anil
women - wise men, and
V on goe and hear it all.
today is tho
LAST
DAY!
PAULINE i
^FREDERICK
BERT LYTEll
10IS WILSON *
by A ACME L. MAYO
wapiUm1 meul°
•i i, minim
YOU
B»iNe I
JUDGE/
More fuel per unit
More heut per slab
When you buy furl for ;i wood bunting furuaee
you shbuld older slabwood. It gives' results, hud it
is not expensive.
1>1 ’T 1)0 VOl: KNOW that slabwood from first,
ghiwth, or virgin trees eUntain approximately one
tliird more fuel per unit, greater density than the
set'Olid growth tloesl' It has taken longer to grow.
There is more heat paekeil into it. Buy slabwood
from
OREGON’S VIRGIN FORESTS
Booth-Kelly
LUMBER CO.
Phone 452