Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, January 31, 1929, Page 4, Image 4

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    Oregon Frosh
Meet Rooks
In First Game
Yearlings Will Open
Conference Schedule
Al Corvallis on Friday
Yotui" Beavers Have Good
Team, Says Spike Leslie
Tlin Oregon frosli basketball team
■will open 11m* 19L’9 fonfcrciico 1»:is
ketbali season tomorrow afternoon
at I o’clock against the Aggie
rooks at. Corv.allis.
I)ospite tin* fad 11i:i 1 from pre*
season games Die frosli appear to
have ri, stronger team Ilian they
have had for three veins, dope gives
the rooks ji slight edge, doing by
this same dope the Oregon yearlings
are placed near the bottom of the
northern division conference teams.
Rooks Strong
Although the rooks defeated
Franklin high, '.17 to 17, .and the
frosli beat them .‘59 to l-’>, tin* rooks
made a better showing against Med
ford high. They ran up a greater
margin of points on them than the
frosli averaged in their three games,
amt Spike Leslie, frosli coach, who
scouted tlo* game, declares that, the
young Reavers have a better team
than they had hast season.
The pjvof man of I heir percentage
system is the center, Fagans. He
is one of the best men at handling
the ball to enter collegiate compe
tition in this region iri years, is
Spike’s opinion. Two of I heir men,
Tom Duffy, guard, and Rill Lyman,
forward, are well known to fid low
ers of Oregon prep school basketball.
Duffy played three years with Sa
lem high ji ml was twice named Jill
state forward, .and Lyman was the
star of lie* La dramie team for two
years. •
Play Washington
The rooks, entering their confer-I
nice play earlier than the fresh, I
have already played the Washington ’
yearlings. They lost, \\7 to i!b.
'Phi* personnel of the team that j
Lakes the floor Friday .afternoon,
jigainsf the rooks is still unsettled.!
Vincent Dolp and Kermit Stevens
are practically sure of holding down
the guard positions, and Henry
Levoff will undoubtedly be one of
the forwards, Spike admits, but the
other forward amt the center posi
tion is uncertain.
Coai'li Leslie has three centers.
They are Don Ibagen, Steve Fletcher,
and Ids till Filipps. K.agen seems to
have I lie edge, now, but may not.
have by game time tomorrow.
'I'lii* forward division was greatly
strengthened when .Jesse Rradley
was declared eligible yesterday. Ill*
entered school fall term under con
dition and has just worked it. off.
He played .against the I9U.S f rosli
"when they wont to Klamath Falls
and met Tod (Jillenwaters ’ A in e ri - j
can Legion team.
Keenan High Man
Hilly Keenan, who leads the frosli j
in scoring, has been laid off since j
tin* bast Medford g.amo to rest up.
He played with the Portland Check
erbojuals before coming to school
.and has already I.a ken part in 10
games this season. Spike gave him 1
a light workout last night, but has
not (budded whether to list* him or
not.
In case Keenan remains on the
bench, Rradley will probably start
at tlu* other forward, although one
of the centers might In* shifted to
licit position.
Kdiling ("lass lo See
Legislature. Session
Dr:m Allen ;iiul Seniors lo
Visit Slide ('iipitnl Soon
—
When tin4 legislators down nt 1
Halcm engage in their biennial bat - !
tics toward the end of the present
session, the editing class of tin'
school of journalism will sit in a
body some Thursday in order to
listen to the various types of ora
tory that emanate on such questions
as the state income tax, automobile
licenses and other prominent topics
ot interest to the legislators, it was
indicated Tuesday by Kric \\ . Allen,
dean of the school of journalism,
ay ho has charge of the editing class.
The class, which is comprised
mostly of seniors, will journey to
the state capital during the latter !
part of the legislative session as
part of their class work.
Juniors in the school of journalism
have been advised also to make the
trip to Salem, owing to the fact that
the legislature meets every two |
years, and that when the present 1
juniors take editing next \car, the\ 1
will be unable to set' the lawmakers I
in action.
(>ift Paintings firing
Slunni at Ait Callery
The Borland Kobiuson exhibit inn
nf paintings lias been placed in the
art gallerv of the art building and
will be there for a week. Borland
ifobinsen's paintings were made a
gift to the university several years
ago by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Itobinson *of Jacksonville, Oregon,
when their daughter died.
These paintings are exhibited I
once a year nnrl are temporarily
I stored in (lie gallery until a place
shall lie provided for them in the
new Fine Arts museum, which is
being planned.
; The “<i paintings lo he exhibited
are done in varying mediums, oil,
Water elder, and pastel. In the
group are still life studies, interiors,
and several water colors of flowers
in vases and howls.
Faville Delivers Talk
To Medford Citizens
Modern Merchandising Is
Held Uncertain by Dean
Business today is in a slate of
companionate prosperity, not com
panionate marriage, tint, likely to lie
just as uncertain in outcome, as the
latter, stated Bean David I1!. Faville,
of the school of business adminis
tration at tho University of Oregon,
in speaking of “The Modern Trend
in Merchandising,” before the eliam
hcr of commerce at Medford yester
day noon.
Together with t"lie members of tho
Medford chamber of commerce, there
were members at the luncheon from
the Medford Rotary, Kiwanis and
Lions clubs. One hundred and thirty
two persons in all were present: to
hear Dean Faville.
A man may be operating his busi
ness on the standard principles of
the trade. Then some other person
cnines along and knocks the pegs
from under him, said the dean.
“The automobile knocked out the
mail order business, because people
began going lo town to simp.
“The mail order business in its
turn, has cut in on the unit store
business by establishing chains of
low priced stores around the eonn
t ry.
“The woolen industry,” continued
Dean Faville, “has been hard hit
by the fashion of wearing silk hos
iery. Radio h.as'Tiiirt the phono
graph and theater business.”
Merchants today must lie as much
awake as to what the fellow outside
his trade is doing, as he is to the
actual opera! ions within his own
business.
Professor III With Flu;
('lasses Iteiug Divided
•Tulin M. Ran, associate professor j
of business ndniinisl rat inn at tlit*
Ifni versify of Ori'pin, has been
tuk<• ii lu the hospital with ;m attack
of flu.
Professor Roe's dosses will be '
divi»loil between .Tames T. Brown, |
mill Roil L. Moser, professors of
business administrntion, it wns :ni
nnnured today by Dean David JO.
I' nville of file business ndministra
tion deportment.
gam
ii'!iiaiiiiiiHii:'nt:im'i!wiii'iBi!i'i'
Ludford’s
For
PAINTS
and
DECORATING
SUPPLIES
I
^ on will find n largo assort- B
meat of rotors and materials Ij
j| lor deeoratinijf. .1 list what you
| will need for that dance.
■
ARTISTIC
TICTURE FRAMING
9 PAINTS ART GOODS *
“ ARTIST SUPPLIES ■
I 55 w. Broadway Plione 749 1
Miiiiiibibiiiibibii
ifiiiai!iiini;iii
STARRING PAY
WRAY
GARY
COOPER
Paramount’s Glorious
Young Lovers
This Nice T Snow
I-ast Night's Snowfall (rood or Punk
According to Your Viewpoint
TOO BAD!
Snow—
Blocks roods
Starts now epidemic of colds on
campus
Wets co-eds’ marcels
Hides green campus grass.
Tough on fresh fire builders.
Tramps snow in front rooms.
JJuins dresses when put down co
eds’ necks.
fold on their anatomies too.
Makes fireplace popular.
Throws man who picks up hits
of paper with a nail on the end j
of a stick out of a job.
- GOOD.
Afakes coasting!
Excellent moans of deciding
grudge between law, journal
ism and geology majors.
Covers up cigarette stubs in
front of the law building.
Makes the air cooler.
Good excuse to maul the co-eds.
Washes mud off shoes.
-Augments appetites. Tough on
dieters.
Makes students read more and
learn more about farm relief.
Good excuse for davenport date.
Gives co-eds a chance to wear
their sriifty cold-weather hab
its and their snazzy new ga
loshes. X
Photos to Be Taken
For Oregana Today
Despite Elements
Storm or no storm, Oregana pic
tures must tie token. Two honorary
groups ami (lie law school classes
will have their pictures taken to
morrow.
The law school groups will tie
pho&graphod' in front of the law
library al lllioO. Immediately fol
lowing at II, the Co-op directorate
will lie snapped oil the steps of the
main library to lie followed by tin'
Daly club at 11: Id.
Members are asked to lie prompt
so as to do away with unnecessary
delay.
The presidents or secretaries of
Iho groups are requested to prepare
a list of all members and bring it
with them when they have their
pictures taken.
“The lists must bn ready on
Thursday morning since they are
to bn turned into the Oregana dnr
ing the afternoon,” said Margaret
Plark, editor of tin- honoraries
section.
Geology Head Attends
Civil Engineers’’ Meet
T)r. Warren T>. Smith, head of tho
geology department, attended a
meeting of the Portland branch of
the American Society of Civil Engi
neers last Saturday, which was call
ed to get advice of engineers and
geologists on the revision of an ex
isting act of the legislature having
to do with the construction of dams.
The present act provides for the
inspection of only irrigation dams
by the state engineer, and the revi
sion has been proposed to make the
act apply to the inspection of all
dams by that officer, having con
sulting engineers and geologists call
ed in to make sure there'is no danger
to the public. The St. Francis dam
disaster at Los Angeles last year
prompted the calling of the meeting.
- - WE RENT - -
FLOOD LIGHTS
VACUUM CLELANERS
and FLOOR WAXERS
BAILEY ELECTRIC CO
640 Willamette
Phone 234
aiimHiiniHBiiiimiMtiHiimwii
Speaking Croup
Picks ‘Congress’
For Final Name
Club Debates Jury System;
Barton, Pfoff to Talk
On Insanity Crime Plea
“TIip Congress” is the name by
which i lie newly formed campus
public speaking club will bo known
hereafter, following the final choice
of this name by members of the
chili, according to 0. Allan Rclloni,
presid put.
The question, “Resolved, that the
jury system be abolished,” was dis
cussed for th(> major part of the
meeting, which was held in the
College Side inn, Wednesday eve
ning. behind Fryer, sophomore in
prelaw, debated the affirmative,
and Eugene Laird, junior in jour
nalism, upheld the negative, each
speaking for eight minutes and pre
senting rebuttals for four minutes.
Civilization has outgrown the jury
system; jurymen are expected to do
something of which they have no
knowledge; we have experts In
every field in our economic world
except in this otic field, that, of jus
tice; why not overthrow the jury
and establish a panel of justice.
Thus argued the affirmative, using
the Vestris, the Remus cases and
many others to emphasize their
point.
But a few notorious cases 'are not
enough, for an attempt to abolish
Fill your car
willl
Richfield
Gas
and onjoy this weather.
We are handy here for you—
near the campus - and we do
complete ear servicing.
OREGON
Service Station
llth and Hilyard
/
A CYCLONE OF
LOVE AND LAUGHS
HAS HIT EUGENE
Ijjj
HEAR and SEE ?
R E G I N A L D
DENNY .
tfedWtJMMU
HEAR DENNY SPEEDING UTS .WAY
AROUND THE (TRVES IN Ills FIRST
TALKING PICTURE HIT
PREVIEW
TONITE
AISO
2 New V1TAPHONE Acts
“IN A MUSIC
SHOPPE ’
A Musical Treat
VITAPHONE
REVUE
Songs ami Steps
the jury system Is n. chnlleugo
reef of I ngainst democracy itself, the
negative replied. The common mrm,
tho man who serves on our juries,
is best qualified to serve for he has
the knowledge of human nature.
The jury system is 8.'i ppr eent per
fect. Wlmt human institution ean
be made more perfect than this
system? asked the negative.
The jury system will he the sub
ject. for several of the varsity and
freshman debates this year, and as
a result many of the team members
were present to enter into the dis
cussion which took place after the
scheduled debate.
‘•Resolved, that insanity should
not be allowed as a defense for
murder,” will be the topic for dis
cussion at next week’s meeting,
with tire subject being introduced
by Clarence Barton, sophomore in
pre-law, on the affirmative, -and
on the negative.
Roger Pfoff, freshman in pre-law,
E.C. Meade
Optometrist
14 8th Avp. W.
Phono :tno
!H3E13E®3i3®e,ISEi
1
PRESSED THE I
TAILORWAY
fi
Your suit is made to Tit |j
you so have it pressed I lie [|j
same way. i|
THE EASTINf! PRESS I
University Tailor [i-j
1128 Alder 1
i=i id
—Taffy—
Not, 1he sticky kind that pulls the filling from your
teeth. Taffy that' is chewy—that’s the kind we make—
Old Fashioned Molasses, French Vanilla and that won
derful chewing Toffee.
WALORA CANDIES
851 13th Ave. East
M* MORE&N Q VWflBURNE
— PHONE 2700 —
LAST DAY SALE
Dexdale Repello
Silk Hose
$ 1.65 Grades - $1.35
$ 1.95 and $2.00 Grades - $1.45
All new' colors—all first quality
nil fresh stock
Concerning
Evening Clothes
For Men
Which must be chosen with the
greatest discrimination. In cor
rect designing, superior fabric
and careful tailoring, Hart
Schaffner & Marx tuxedos
achieve a distinction which’ lik
ens them to the best in custom
tailoring.
WADE BROS.
Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes