Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, January 23, 1926, Page 4, Image 4

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    STUDENT BODY
HEAD APPROVES
WALKER'S PLAN
Admittance of Student Body
Officials to Faculty Meet
ings is Advocated
Much Discussion is Given
Proposal; Students I n
Favor of New Plan
“You can quote me as being
heartily in favor of the motion of
Dean Walker suggesting the ad
mittance of three or four student
body officials to faculty meetings,
which is to bo voted upon soon,”
said Walter Malcolm, president of
Ihe Associated Students of the Uni
versity of Oregon, yesterday when
asked his opinion of the new plan.
At the last faculty meeting, Jan
uary 13, Dean Walker, dean of men,
gave notice of a motion to be put
before that body which would per
mit attendance at faculty meetings
of the student body president, the
editor of the Emerald, the secre
tary of the student body and the
women’s league president. Much
discussion has followed this pro
posal and students are much in
favor of the plan.
Benefits Outlined
“The benefits to bo gained by
such a practice,” continued Mal
colm “are many. It represents an
opportunity for students to see and
understand bettor the faculty point
of view. Many controversies como
up between faculty and students
which, in most eases could be ill
uminated by a better. understand
ing between them. This new op
portunity for students to attend
faculty meetings ought to eradicate
such difficulties.”
That allowing students to attend
faculty meetings will make possi
ble an expression of student atti
tude, not necessarily a vociferous
one, but some expression just the
same, is an important point brought
out by the student body president.
The proposed plan ought to re
sult in better cooperation between
faculty and students in all affairs
concerning the University, ho said.
In the student’s opinion he fools
that it is only reasonable that un
dergraduates should have the priv
ilege of knowing the motives for
faculty actions when those actions
vitally effect tlio studonts.
“Behind theso reasons, there is a
deeper and even more important
one,” said Malcolm. “It is a na
tural tendency of human nature to
do better work and tako more in
terest in thoso tilings in which ono
is actually playing a part. If the j
students felt, that they had just a
small part, even though it be infin
itesimal, in the teaching, course
making, and intellectual side of
college life, their interest would be
greater. If the faculty wishes to
increase this interest., in my opin
ion, it should act favorably on
Dean Walker's motion,”
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TROY
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1561 OAK ST. PHONE 1068
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ANDERSON SURPASSED ONLY
BY RUSSIANS, SAYS YOUNG
Artistic Spontaneity Exhibited by Author’s
“Dark Laughter Shows More Form
Works;
Sherwood Anderson, in my opin
ion, ranks foremost among the
writers of today, and is surpassed
by none except the Russians who
have had a more intense back
ground. He compares favorably
with Chekov and Dostovcsky, but
it is unjust to accuse him of imitat
ing them, because he had never read
any Russian literature until after
he had published the short stories
that drew the accusation.
There are four main points to
bring out in a charaterization of
Anderson. First, there is the dis
tinct separation of his life as an
advertiser and manufacture, and
this desire of his to indulge in
fancy, in play and adventure. Sec
ond, he is not avered to work, as
has been claimed. Ho dislikes put
ting all one’s energy to acquiring a
living, but believes that a business
that requires a man’s creative ab
ility is not all objoctional. Third,
Anderson’s own creat(ive ability
has kept pace with his maturity.
Jn his childhood and youth he told
wildly impossible tales, but as an
artist he keeps his fancy and day
dreaming along with reality. In
this Way he has a universal appeal,
for people actually do have this
desire for expression, realising,
sometimes, the futility of driving,
always driving to make money.
The fourth point to be brought
out is his literary style. My own
reaction to his stylo is that, from
a literary point of view, he has
very little appreciation of form. His
stories spring forth spontaneously;
he does very little planning of plot,
and even loss revision. This clement
of wholesale spontaneity is, by the
way, a good example of the uncon
scious creation of art. His latest
book, “Dark Laughter,” is better
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written, because he is getting more
consciousness of form, and does not
sprawl as he, has hitherto.
“Many Marriages,” is, I believe,
a short story made long, and spoil
ed by this sprawling. It seems to
me an expansion of his short story,
“Out of Nothing into Nowhere,”
and to have gained little in the
retelling.
“Winesburg, Ohio,” a collection
of his short stories, will, I am sure,
outlast “Main Street,” because it
is nearer to life. While Lewis’
literary style is better, the insight
and understanding of people that
is a part of Anderson’s greatness,
does not equal “Winesburg, Ohio.”
Anderson has been called a neu
rotic, but his adaption of his day
dreams to reality shows rather cre
ative genius. It is unjust to accuse
him of pandering to sex and the
cheaper emotions of life; I believe
that he is genuinely frank, honest,
and sincere in everything he writes.
To realize this idea one must read
his autobiography, “The Story Tell
er’s Story.”
A most curious thing about Sher
wood Anderson is the fact that his
words arc so greatly influenced by
his reading the Bible. He likes the
Old Testament, and its literary
flare, best; the effect this has up
on his ideas, but especially his
words, can easily 'be seen.
Anderson’s life, as shown in his
autobiography, is most interesting
psychologically. As a child he lis
tened to the wonderful adventures
BARNEY McPHILLIPST
now teaching at
Stangs Dance Studio
Private and Class Lessons
30 East Ninth St.
Phone 2279
Yellow
Cab
Call
THECURLSHOP
will continue their special
of a shampoo and marcel
for $1.25 Monday, Tues
day, Wednesday, and
Thursday only.
Watch Our Weekly Specials—•
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Entrance Lemon “O” Phar
macy Phone 1522
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CLASSES FOR UNIVERSITY
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Time—9:45 a. m.
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his father, a sign painter, related
of the Civil War. As he grew older
he and his father were rivals in
imaginative creation. He. went to
Chicago when a young “an and
joined a group of young artists and
writers, who influenced his early
writings by. their socialistic and
radical views. He did not start to
publish until long after he had Writ
ten much. He began to realize
early that he did not want to ex
press the views of the Chicago
group—in fact, we find this formal
revolt against society in no book
except “Marching Men.”
His next stories showed a break
ing away from this revolt. These
are the one’s for which he is most
noted. His early short stories had
little sale- and little effect upon his
reputation. He has had one book
of poems published, but he has
written many which he probably
will never be able to print.
DEAN REBEC TO SPEAK
IN PORTLAND CHURCH
Dr. George Eebec, of the depart
ment of philosophy, will deliver
three of a series of six lectures be
ing given weekly in Portland at
the Unitarian church, Friday morn
ings at elevn o’clock, for the bene
fit of the University of Oregon and
Reed college.
Dr. Rebec spoke yesterday on
“Rehabilitation.” His other two
lectures will be given February 5,
on “Peace Prospects,” and Febru
ary 19, on “The Social and Cul
tural Situation.”
CHARACTERS SELECTED
FOR DANCE FEATURE
Orchesus to Present Drama
At McDonald Theater
The cast of characters for the
fairy theme from Midsummer
Night’s Dream, the main feature
of the dance drama which is to be
given by Orchesus at the McDonald
theater, April 1, has been selected
by Miss Lillian L. Stupp who is
in charge of the drama.
The program will consist of sev
eral dance dramas besides Midsum
mer Nights Dream. The Lake of
Swans, Dabs from a Paint Box, and
another short series will be pre
sented.
Orchesus will have the co-opera
tion of the art and music depart
ment in producing the drama. Miss
Stuup believes that this will corre
late the three departments and
show their relationship.
The cast of characters for Mid
summer Nights Dream include: Ti
tania, Elizabeth Ealbott; Oberon,
Kitty Sartain; Puck, Elizabeth
Lewis; Bottom, Frances Vaughan;
Quinze; Violet Reed; Flute, Beat
rice Mason; Starveling, Ejlith
Huntsman; Snout, Louise Bucha
nan; Snug, Dorothy Henderson;
Every Sunday f rom 6to 9 p.m.
Music
by the
Vagabonds
at
$t Gfottme ^Ijoppe
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Phone 1080
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and Briquets
Rainier Coal Company
15 E. 7th Street Telephone 412
Isn't It Worth 16c
per Day—
to have a “Grand Prize
Eureka Vacuum Clean
er at your service ?
Phone 1750 and let us
explain how you can
secure one of these fa
mous machines.
Special
An $8.50 set of “High ^
Vacuum” Attachments
Free
with each purchase of a
EUREKA
Eureka Vacuum Cleaner Co.
68 W. 0th — Stanley Building — Phone 1760
Several Used Machines, $10.00 up
Changeling Child, Elda Wilson;
Peaseblossom, Edith Pierce j Cob
web; Etha Clark; Mustard Seed,
Edith Bain; Moth, Janet Wood;
Love in Idleness, Frances Hare.
The first fairy will be chosen
from the following list of fairies:
Dorothy Peters, Louise Wisecarver,
Iola Rubinstein, Grace Potter, Helen
Robson, Alta Knips, Bernice Lamb,
Gertrude Hill and Alene Larimer.
The part of the wounded swan
in the Lake pf the Swans will
be taken by Elizabeth Talbot. Kitty
Sartain and Dorothy Henderson are
the other swans.
FRESHMAN DEVELOPS
SPINAL MENINGITIS
Harold Moshberger, a freshman
whose home is in Woodbrun, is in
isolation at the infirmary where he
is being treated for spinal meningi
tis. Dr. Fred N. Miller stated last
night that while the disease in the
first stages progressed rapidly, a
slight response to the serum treat
ment has been noted. MosW>erger,
who became ill Thursday was
placed in the infirmary by I£. Mill
er who immediately suspend the
nature of the disease. m
Although it is highly inmrobable
that any more cases will ^develop,
those who recently came in, contact
with Moshberger have been iso
lated, and upon the slightest sus
picion, immediate steps will be
taken to stop further developments.
Patronise the Emerald Advertisers
Old Time
DANCE
every
SATURDAY NITE
W. O. W. Hall
Corner 8th and Lincoln
Under Private Supervision
Public Invited
3 The Big Show Everyone Is Waiting to See I
I WRESTLING I
■
A1 Karasick 3
THE RUSSIAN LION B
VS* P
Mike Yokel I
PRESENT LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPION * «
_ |
30-MINUTE PRELIMINARY I
BOX-OFFICE OPENS TODAY AT 10 A. M.
.Ringside $1.65
General Admission, lower floor $1.10
Balcony $1.10
NOTE—New grandstand ringside seats installed, every seat a
good view.
1
1 The Most
■ Welcome
I Food of All1
Fresh, crispy, tasty, whole
some doughnuts — my, can’t
you just taste them. And
gosh, how you’ll enjoy them
the first time they are put on
the table.
Purest ingredients, well baked
and fresh daily.
We are prepared to take care of any
special pastry work, and will gladly
bake you any cakes or fancy cookies
for your party. We are experts in
that line. Let us advise and help
you in planning for that next din
ner pr dance.
Blodgett’s Model Kitchen
PHONE 103
TODAY
LAST
DAY
IN
ANNIE ROONEY”
SHE WILL WIN YOUR HEART ANEW—FILLED TO THE
BRIM WITH HUMOR AND PATHOS AND THE JOY OF
LIFE, HER GREATEST PICTURE.
Extra Added Attraction
J'. “LIFE’S
GREATEST
THRILLS’*
THE MOST AMAZING
SCREEN NOVELTY
EVER PRESENTED.
fSank d. c.
ALEXANDER
Special Obncert
“IN ANNIE ROONEY’S
OWN BACK YARD”
POPULAR
PRICES
Matinee — 35c
Evening — 50c
McDonald
THEATRE
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