Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, October 10, 1925, Page 4, Image 4

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    MILL RACE MAT
LOSE TRADITION
Fear Of Commercialism
Leads to Action
RESOLUTION IS PASSED
Council Objects to Marring
Beuty of Place
Encroachment of commercialism
upon the mill race, long cherished
in Oregon tradition in memory,
song, and prose and equally cher
ished in reality, is now frowned
upon by the student council, which
yesterday announced a resolution
condemning specifically the erection
of a public dance hall near the site
of the annual canoe fete.
The council’s resolution, though
addressed to whom it may concern,
was sent to members of the city
planning commission of Eugene, of
which Mayor E. B. Parks is a mem
ber.
Commission Is Named
Others on the commission are:
Prof. W. R. B. Wilcox, school of
architecture; Miss Mozelle Hair, ex
tension division; Paul Kelty, editor
Eugene Guard; Judge E, O. Potter,
957 Willamette street; S. M. Cal
kins, U. 8. National bank building;
H. B. Ruth, 395 West Seventeenth
street; Harry Devereaux, city en
gineer; and Dr. N. C. Nelson, White
Temple, Eugene.
The resolution was adopted by
the student council at its meeting
September 30, when Anna DeWitt
and Carl Dahl were instructed to
prepare the paper. Yestesday copies
were placed in the mail for the
members of the planning commis
sion.
Future Action Problematical
“The student council, speaking
for the Associated Students, be
lieves the mill race should be main
tained in its present form,” Walter
Malcolm, president, said in a state
ment yesterday. “Just what action
wo can take is problematical at this
time,” he added, “but we aro pre
pared to defend our position.”
The resolution, in full, follows:
Whereas: The annual canoe fete
sponsored by the University of Ore
gon affords a great deal of enter
tainment and pleasure to- the stu
dents, the people of Eugene, and
the guests of the University, and
Whereas: Any commercial enter
prise tehding to utilize either the
mill race, ■ or its banks in this
vicinity, would impair tlio beauty
of this fete and ultimately load to
its abolishment, and
Whereas: The erection of a public
dance hall would change the atmos
phere of the mill race from its pic
turesque quietness to that of jnzz,
noise, and lights, and
Whereas: The congestion of traf
fic at a dangerous intersection of
highway and railway crossing, by
the Anchorage, would endanger the
safety of student pedestrians,
Therefore, Be It Resolved by the
students of the University of Ore
gon that any such undertaking is
contrary to their interests and is
undesirable* in proximity to the
University.
HOW STUDENTS ENTER
HAYWARD FIELD TODAY
All Oregon students go through
gate eight to the new stand, by
order of Jack Benefiel. This is
necessary to avoid congestion at
the gates. Students are also re
quested to leave their cars at
home.
NEW YORK ATTRACTS
FORMER OREGONIANS
Oregon Colony Springing Up
In New York
•‘Quite an Oregon eblo^iy is
springing up around Columbia Uni
versity and Nejv York,” reads a
letter just received by Professor
George Turnbull, from John Piper,
: journalism graduate of ’24, who is
in New York.
i While on the campus, Mr. r'lper
was associate editor of the Em
erald under Arthur Rudd. He is
now with the New York Sun.
According to the letter, Kefineth
Youel, ’23, former editor of the
Emerald, has been in New York.
He is considering a position with
a Philadelphia paper.
Claude Robinson, ’24, former A. 8.
U. O. president, is attending Co
lumbia University and staying at
Furnald Hall.
John MacGregor, ’23, and presi
dent of the A. S. U. O. that year,
is taking law at New York Uni
versity.
Marion Lay, ’23, is writing scen
arios for Universal Films. Kate
Pinneo, of the same class is work
ing in a book store in New York.
Hank Foster, ex ’20, former Ore
gon track nmn, and his wife are in
| New York also.
Virginia Pearson, ’24, is attend
ing Pratt Institute in Brooklyn
taking a library course.
EXPERIENCES IN AFRICA
TOLD BY HOLDREDGE
Claire Iioldredge, graduate of
tho University three years ago and
since a diamond miner in the Bel
gian Conga of Central Africa, talk
ed to the Condon Club on his ex
! periences in Africa and the dia
j mond mines Thursday night. The
1 club, composed of geology majors
and professors, assembled at Dr.
I Warren D. Smth’s home. This Was
| the first meeting of tho year.
One of the main points of Mr.
Holdrodge’s speech was to discuss
tho geology of the country, a mat
| ter of interest to the geology ma
I jors. In brief, he described tho
land as being void of forestry; a
! high, gently rolling plateau.
“Because of tho barrenness of tho
I land,” lie said, “the inhabitants
i must plant everything they eat,
] due to the ,fact that tho leading
j crop is a hienuicl, and because of
j the native’s inability to store away
j for the future, they have two years
; of plenty, followed by two year’s
of famine,” the Oregon graduate
explained.
The speaker also expressed his
belief that, although some temper
ate zones, as for example the canal
zone, could be made inhabitable for
the white man, Africa never would.
; lie gave two reasons for this: it is
! too lurge a country, and the ma
! laria mosquito is too prevalent.
mmm\
Walk-Over Shoes
FOR
MEN
FOR
WOMEN
Fight, Fight,
F°z'' zm Oregon,
Fight, Fight!
YOU’VE THE BETTER TEAM
WE’VE THE BETTER SHOES
Wilde&Knapp
THE WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP
with
Green - Kilborn Co.
825 Willamette Street
H
1
1
1
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c-1
BOARD ORDERS MANY
CHANGES IN COURSES
A ruling upon the question of the
alleged duplication of the Univer
sity’s courses by the Oregon Agri
cultural College was made by the
Board of Higher Curicula during
the summer at meetings held in
Portland.
The most important changes or
dered were the elimination of the
course in pre-engineering at the
University and that in pre-medics
at the College. The boards ruled
that music was a special subject
of instruction and journalism as a
major course ior department be
confined to the University alone
and that only service courses in
these subjects and in physical ed
ucation be given at O. A. C.
The department of household arts
at the University is to be reorgan
ized along lines that met the ap
proval of the board. The board
ruled that the school of business ad
ministration at the University and
the school of commerce at the col
lege are sufficiently differentiat
ed, and that they may operate at
both institutions as at present.
An agreement had been reached
between the two institutions re
garding courses in education and
the arts and scienes previously to
the meeting of the board at which
the rulings above were made.
The controversy arose last spring
when O. A. C. submitted a list of
new courses to the board of higher
curricula for approval. The Uni
versity in a brief presented May 18
protested against many of these
courses on the ground that they
would duplicate work already off
ered at the University.
At a meeting held in May be
tween Colin V. Dyment, dean of
the college of literature, science,
and the arts at the University, and
ST. E. Smith, dean of the School of
basic arts and sciences, the Agri
cultural College agreed not to offer
a bachelor’s degree in its school of
basic arts and sciences and to offer
no major work in this school, its
courses to serve only as service
courses.
In July Dean H. D. Sheldon of
the school of education at Oregon
and Dean E. D. Resslep of the
school of vocational education at
O. A. C. reached an agreement re
garding courses to be offered in the
respective schools.
Policy Regarding China
Chosen for Debate With
0. A. C. V^sity Team
Continued from page one)
contest; Joe Frazer, who partici
pated in the Oregon-Stanford Radio
bedate; Herschel Brown, member
of the team which met O. A. C. and
Ralph Bailey, who debated in the
Washington-Idaho-Orefe;on contest.
B. V. Ludington, an experienced de
bater, \co attended Northwestern
university last year, will be among
the applicants for this year’s team.
A debate has also been scheduled
for the freshmen men of Oregon
Pictures of
Frosh-Sophomore Mix
Also of the
OREGON-MULTNOMAH
. GAME
BAKER-BUTTON
KODAK SHOP
7 West 7th 'h;,
“SEE YOURSELF IN THE MIX”
REGULAR
LUNCHES
20c, 35c, and 50c
Served from I I to 2
REGULAR DINNER 65cts.
Served from 5 to 8
Ye Town Shoppe
ERNEST SUETE
FREE
of Famous High-Vacuum
With the
purchase of
each Grand
Prii©
Attachments
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Remember— thir mui
iagly gancroui offer
may be withdrawn at
any time!
And
ONLY
Darla* Grant Fall H,
This is your chancel "Withoutone cent of
added cost we will present you with your
purchase of a latest model Eureka Vacuum
Cleaner a full and complete set of world-re
nowned Eureka “ High-Vacuum " attach
ments! Think of receiving absolutely free
this master set of unequaled cleaning at
tachments—all yours if you act now while
this great offer lasts.
Great Eureka Fall
Housecleaning Campaign
September i4th to OcTOBER|3nt
Yes, you can enjoy the FREE use of a
brand new Grand Prize Eureka and all at
tachments during your fall housecleaning.
This priceless housecleaning help does not
cost you one penny or place you under the
slightest obligation! Then think what it
means to keep the Eureka by paying only
$4.50 down. We will deliver the cleaner
right to your door any time you say and
•how you exactly how to use it.
* 27 9th Ave. E. Phone 1750
WIFE SAVING STATION
EUREKA VACUUM
CLEANER CO.
and Corvallis. The question is, Re
solved: That the federal govern- |
ment should discontinue granting I
subsidies to states. The prelim- !
inaries for this event which will j
take place in April, will be held
October 29.
The freshmen aebates will give ;
first ear men and women training I
for varsity events.
The plans for the women’s con
tests are being arranged by Mil
dred Whitcomb, forensic manager
for women. Miss Whitcomb also
has charge of the arrangements for
the freshman women’s debate,
which will probably be held with
O. A. C. ' This will be a unique
event. “I know of no place in
te United States where a contest i
of this kind is held,” declared !
Coach Gray.
Anyone wishing to enter the pre
liminaries for the varsity or the
freshmen teams is urged to call on
Mr. Gray, coach.
VARSITY
BARBER SHOP
Eleventh and Alder
OUR MOTTO
Quality First
LAST
TIMES
TODAY
A Picture of
The Later
Gold Rush
Days
“Beauty
and the
Bad Man”
Popular Prices
EVENINGS — 25c
MATINEES — 20c
CHILDREN — 10c
MATINEES AT 2:30 P. M.
PAINE’S
COLONIAL
* llth and Alder
Monkeys-M'an-Human Progress
Will Be Discussed in the Religious Address of the
Rev. Frank Fay Eddy
Sunday-Morning at The
UNITARIAN CHURCH
East Eleventh Avenue at Ferry Street
The Theme Is One in the Series Being Given This Month on
“The Faith of An Evolutionist”
This on dealing with humanity from the
view of an evolutionist
The Solbist at This Service Will Be
BARBARA EDMONDS, SOPRANO
The Unitarian Church
accepts the interpretation Science gives of the universe. Logic
ally we must face the fact that the infinitisnjal part of the cos
mos we call our world was not specially created for man but that
man has as a fundamental problem the one of understanding adap
tation, not only in this near world but in the wide reaches of the
cosmos,
TO NEW STUDENTS in the University we would advertise the
presence of this distinctly humanistic and liberal church. We
are one in spirit with the scientific atmosphere you will^ find in
the lecture rooms of the University. We offer the religious inter
pretation to scientific facts. You are always welcome to our serv
ices. We offer you that fine comradeship which flowers in lives
which freely seek the truth.
‘How a Religious Liberal Reads His Bible’
supplemented by a study of characteristic books of the Bible
will be the general theme of a series of talks by Frank Fay Eddy,
pastor of the church, during the next few months. An invitation
is given to anyone interested in making a study of the Bible as
a collection of sacred literature to join this class which meets ^at
the close of the Morning Service for organization.
It Is “The Little Church of the
Human Spirit”
Why Rent?
You Can Buy Any Make of
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER
CORONA
REMINGTON
UNDERWOOD
For $5.00 Down, $5.00 per Month
We have a large stock of Rebuilt Typewriters in
all standard makes, for sale or for rent.
OFFICE MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.
1047 Willamette Street
Phone 148
Sudden Service
SHOE REPAIRING WHEN
YOU WANT IT
JIM, The Shoe Doctor
(NEXT DOOR TO PETER PAN)
Shoe Shining With a Smile by John and Mike
.. „ we
After the
IDAHO-OREGON football game
. Take The
SOUTHERN PACIFIC
SPECIAL TRAIN TO PORTLAND
. Cabinet Lunch Car on Train to Serve
Light Lunches
Saturday
Week-end round trip fare $5.30
F. G. Lewis, Ticket Agent, Phone 2200
SOUTHERN PACIFIC LINES
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