Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, January 18, 1924, Page 4, Image 4

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    POLITICAL GROUP
ELECTS OFFICERS
- T
• -
Art Rosebraugh is Head; |
Five Others Named
DEAN MAKES COMMENT
Faculty Does Not Oppose
Formation of Club
The Republican society organized
on the campus has recently elected an
executive committee consisting of
Arthur Hosebraugh, chairman; Geor
gia Benson, secretary-treasurer; and
Jason McCune, Georgiana Gerlinger,:
Jack Day and Junior Seton. Five,
or six sub committees will be an
nounced later.
John N. Hamlin, who is in charge \
of the college bureau of the Repub
lican National committee, attended
the University from 1915 to 1918,
when he enlisted in the army. Ho
majored in economics and was prom
inent in the track squad. For the
past four and a half' years he has
been at Harvard.
Interest to be Created
The purpose of the organization,
According to Mr. ITamlin, is to create
a more active interest in public af- j
fairs on the part of the students. |(
Another feature of the club is that
it is self-perpetuating and was organ-;
ized on a permanent basis, under the
authority of the college bureau of
the Republican National committee.
The executive committeo that has
been appointed will cooperate with
the Oregon State Republican commit
tee as well as the national committee.
The organization of students in the j
interest of informing them on the
important issues which arise has re
ceived comment from the administra- j
tion in the form of a statement is-1
sued by Colin Dyment, dean of the
college of literature, science, and the
arts yesterday.
Dyment Gives Opinion
Mr. Dyment said:
“The political opinions of a stu
dent are his personal affair, just as
are his religious beliefs. There is
accordingly no objection to the for
mation of a private political club by
students. This is a state university,
however, and as such cannot mingle
in either political or religious issues.
Therefore a political club would bo
prohibited from using the name of
the University in any official wav,
•and in any partisan political under
taking would be expected to act as
'individuals and not to involve the
University, since as stated the Uni
versity itself is strictly non-pol
itical. Tt might bo preferable, inas
much as the University could not
well discriminate among parties that
political meetings be held in the “Y”
nut, rather than in University build
ings if the secretary will extend the
courtesies.”
OREGON KNIGHTS PLAN
TO ASSIST AT GAMES
Group to Handle All Varsity and
Frosh Contests: Initiation
Comes Thursday
The Oregon Knights at the last
mooting, hold Wednesday night,;
made arrangements for handling all
tlio varsity and freshmen basket-hall
games. Ed Tapfor, head of the or
gani/ntion. outlined the plan tor tak
iag earn of the varsity games in the
armory where 14 knights will be on
dutv at every game..
Tn order to get the spectators set
tled before the game starts . all
knights on the ushering committee
are reonested to report- at the armory
at least 45 minutes before the game
is scheduled. “ Tt is imperative that
everyone on the committee be there
on time to handle the crowds,” said
Taofer.
Initiation for the fifteen neo
ydiytes of the organization is planned
to be held next Thursday. Some
novel stunts are being worked out.
for the knights to perform on the'
c,minus, Thursday, before initiation.
The basketball ushering committee
for this term is:
Si Simula, chairman: George Jos
eph, Parker Brnnin, Pick Wright.
Ken Birkemeier, -Tim Johnson, Tom
Mahnnev, Ben Smith, Web .Tones,
.Toe Saari, Ken How. Trving Brown, j
Warren Small and Cylbert Met lollun.
JAMES TURNBULL DIES
Grandfather of Journalism Profeasor
Passes Away Thursday
.Tames Turnbull. 05. grandfather
of Prof. George Turnbull, of the
school of journalism, died early
yesterday morning at the latter’s
home, 1550 Thirteenth Knst. Mr.
Turnbull was n resident of Eugene
for the past six years, living with
his grandson, and his daughter.
Mrs. M. J. Gettings.
Born June 11, 1828, in Berwick
shire, Scotland, Mr. Turnbull lived
through memorable periods of Brit
ish and American history. He was
one of the oldest men in Eugene
at the time of his death. He
mastered the plumbing trad§ while
a young man and worked jn many
parts of Scotland and England.”In
1892 he came to America at the
age of 64, accompanied by his fami
ly. They settled n Marysville, Wn.
Later they removed to Bellingham,
and finally to Seattle.
Funeral services will be held at
Veatch’s chapel, Saturday at 10:30
a. m., the Rev. Bruce Giffen, Univer
sity pastor, officiating.
ART BUILDING TO HAVE
GARDEN ON SOUTH SiDE
Plants to be Models for Sketches
as Well as For Campus
Beautification
Among recent improvements on the
campus is the garden which is being
planted in the court between the two
wings on the south side of the art
building. Trees, shrubs, vines, bulbs,
perrenial plants and growing things
of all kinds' will be planted there
eventually, partly for the benefit of
art students and partly for beautifi
cation.
Already a white birch tree, some |
azalias, pink, salmon and yellow,
some golden glow, golden bell and a
Camellia rose have been planted in
addition to a boxwood hedge, pink
almond and Japanese quince in the
shrubbery class and wisteria in the
climbing division.
Tt is planned to plant several cy
press trees, tulips, crocuses, dahlias,
chrysanthemums, asters, delphinium,
hollyhocks, snap-dragons, cosmos, bo
ganvilla, rhododendrons, Oregon
grape, holly, Virginia creeper, etc.
In fact, H. M. Fisher, superintendent
of buildings and grounds, is deter
mined that the embryo artists, and
even thoso in the more advanced
stages, shall feel the lack of nothing
when it comes to the selection of a
living model for a sketch of some di
vision of the flora adaptable to the
climate of the Willamette valley.
Flans do not, however, call for
the planting of fruits and vegetables,
the impracticability of such a plan
having been recognized when the
well known penchant, of artists on
the road to success, that of munch
ing any known available edible sub
staneo, was considered. Tt would bn
unsightly and inconvenient to have
turnip plants and the cherry trees
slyly demolished.
1 At the Theatres |
----<!>
CASTLE
Wliat is declared to bo the larg
est string of pearls in existence is
worn by Barbara La Marr in “The
Eternal City,” a First National pic
ture produced by George Fitz
nmUrice, which is now playing at
the Castle theater. Other members
of the cast are Lionel Barrymore,
Bert Lytell, Richard Bennett and
Montagu Love.
Miss La Marr plays the role of
Donna Roma, a littlo peasant girl
who, by a queer twist of fate, be
comes the ward of a fabulously
wealthy countess. She is shown
wearing scores of beautiful gowns
of the latest fashion, and with one
of these wears the pearls, (’oiled j
twice about her neck, the string i
of pearls extends to her shoetops. j
REX
A romance that for tragic strength i
rivals “Romeo and Juliet,” is said!
lo be contained in Marshall Neil :
nil’s latest photoplay, “The
de.'.vous,” which is having its
premiere at the Rex today.,
the picturesque atmosphere
quiet Russian peasant village
an takes Conrad Nagt'l, as an
Ren
local
Into
of a
Neil
Ain
eri.au army offices and Sydney
Chaplin as an English Tommy, and
introduces them to the inhabitants
of the town. Lucille Hickson, Elmo
Lincoln, Eugenie Besserer, and Em
mett Corrigan help to comprise the
villagers and enact prominent roles
in the weaving of Neilau’s drama.
CONDON CLUB PLANS HOP
TO BE GIVEN FEBRUARY 2
Condon club is planning a i
dance to be given on February 2. .
The affair is for all the members
of the club and will be informal.
The place has not as yet been de
cided on. .
HARVARD HAS 86 MEN
OUT FOR WINTER WORK
Harvard Cniversify -Eighty-live
men reported for winter work of
the Harvard crew recently. The
athletes are required to run a half
mile ami then up and down the bog
bowl three times. This program will
be follow. .1 by the coach during the
rest of the winter.
COMPLETES SMELTERS
Phipps Constructs Pots
Electrically Heated
Troy Phipps, graduate assistant in
the physics department, has com
pleted two small electrically heated
smelters. Each, weighing less t,nan
a pound, attains i< temperature cf
1800 degrees Fahrenheit using the
ordinary 110 volt A. C. light cir
cuit.
in a recent trial when lead *as
m.’ted in one of the pots such a high
temperature was reached that the
enamel finish melted into the load.
'•This shows that the-pots can reach
a higher tempern.ture than was
originally believed,” he said.
The complete assembling of the
parts was done by Phipps himself.
The current passes through a Nicli
rome wire which surrounds the pot
and which develops the high resis
tance required to obtain the heat.
To retain the heat within the inte
rior walls the pot is packed with
magnesium. The wall of the furnace
is an alundnm crucible.
The chief feature about the pot is
its smallness in size and weight, but
yet it is able to produce such a
high temperature. Weighing less
than a pound, it is possible to hold
either one in the hand very easily.
“I don’t believe the average per
son realizes the importance of the
fact that only 119 volts are required
to get such a high temperature,”
said Phipps. “One usually thinks it
is wonderful to get enough current
to heat an electric iron, toaster,
stove, and other utensils about the
house requiring heat, but to imagine
the appearance of enough heat to
melt copper, zinc, brass, lead, and
other metals is beyond average
comprehension.”
Mr. Phipps started his work on the
construction of the two last fall when
he began his wiring. The parts used
in the assembling of the smelters
were secured in the east. This is a
branch of the research work which
Phipps is doing for his graduate de
gree.
OREGON DEBATERS TO
MEET CANADIAN TEAM
(Continued fFom page 1)
mediately recognize the present
Soviet government of Russia.”
At the same time that the Brit
ish Culumbia-Oregon debate is in
progress here, there will be two
other debates of the triangle, one
at Moscow, Idaho, where the Ore
gon negative, composed of Walter
Malcolm and Marion Dickey, will
meet the Idaho affirmative, and the
olfler at Vancouver, B. C. This
will be between tho Universities of
Idaho and British Columbia.
In the opinion of Mr. Kosson,
Dickey and Malcolm should also put
up good arguments.
“They aro both willing to handle
tho negative case on a foreign
floor,” said Mr. Rosson, “and both
should do very well, for they pos
sess pleasing personalities, coupled
with excellent ability to analyze
and refute opposing arguments ef
fectively. Both have had consider
able experience as public speakers,
and have builded a strong case in
support of the negative.”
The British Columbia debaters
wore expected to arrive last night
or this morning. Their names have
not been sent in to Elam Amstutz,
forensic manager.
On account of the class parties,
which are to take place tonight,
the coaches and manager scheduled
the debate for 7:15, so that it will
be over by 8:45 or 9:00, and con
scvpicutly will not interfere with the
class affairs.
Roland M. Miller, professor of
economics, will act as chairman to
Tclassified ads^
• Minimum charge, 1 time, 26c: 2 times,
| 45c : 8 times, 60c ; 1 week, $1.20. Must
' be limited to 5 lines : over this limit
| 5c per line. Phene 961, or leave copy
1 with Business office of Emerald, in
| University Press. Office hours, 1 to
I 4 p. m. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE ONLY
o—-■— -o
FOR RENT — Furnished apart
ments for students; over Gampa
Sluippe. Inquire Gampa Shoppe.
J-6 tf.
EASTMAN KODAKS
and FILMS
BAKER - BUTTON
7th and Willamette
The startling
revelation
L of the
A secret of
I youth and
I beauty
SLACK OaK
night. The three judges will be
George Mansfield, Marshfield at
torney, who is candidate for United
Spates Senator; George L. Koehn,
former debate coach at Lincoln
I high asd Reed College, Portland,
' and Fred Lockley, special writer on
the staff of the Oregon Journal.
The speeches this year will be of
I different length from those of the
past several years. Instead of the
former twenty-minute constructive
i speeches and five-minute rebuttals,
there will be seventeen-minute con
structive and seven-minute rebuttal
speeches.
EL CIRCULO CASTELLANO
ELECTS NEW PRESIDENT
At a recent meeting of El Circulo
Castellano, Norma Wilson, presi
dent of the club, resigned her office
and Lowell Angel was elected to
take her place. A program com
mittee was appointed, consisting of
Virginia West, chairman, Alladeen
Scroggin, Irene Burton and Russell
Crawford. The club expects to
hold its meetings twice a month
regularly hereafter.
EXERCISE MAKES COLLEGE
WOMEN MODERN VENUSES
Syracuse University—The “Daily
Dozen” and track exercise are
making Syracuse university a col
lege of Venuses, according to Kath
erine Sibley, head of the women’s
physical education department. Miss
Sibley claims the work in the de
partment is bringing the women to
perfect proportions.
All of Romes
3,000 years
in one
glorious
night!
The Coliseum—
The Forum—
The Roman Capital—
The Appian Way—
The Roman Baths—
the life—the glory—the
pageantry and the loves of
the most romantic empire
in the world—
All pictured with the sweeping
grandeur of the
George
Fitzmaurice
Production
A Modern Romance
“Don’t, Baron!
lit: was my
first love— will
be my last love
—ran be the
only one love
of my life.”
Barbara La Marr
Bert Lytell
Lionel Barrymore
Montague Love
Today and Saturday
THE
CASTLE
FELIX, THE KITTY, Comedy
Continuous Performance
Charles Runyan
on the Oregan
CLUB PLANS BREAKFAST
I Advertising Men to Give Affair
During Convention of Editors
i _
Plana for a special breakfast to
1 be given for visiting advertising
| men were definitely made by the
! University of Oregon Advertising
I club at its regular luncheon yester
j day. The breakfast will take place
| during the state editorial conven
j tion which will be held in Eugene,
i February 15 and 16. Several
i prominent professional advertising
I men of the northwest will be on the
campus at that time, and the Ad ;
club will take that opportunity to
discuss advertising problems with
authorities on the subject.
A program is to be presented by
the campus group in the near fu
ture at one of the regular meetings
of the Portland Advertising club.
“Our Arguments Are Warm”
at the
WESLEY CLUB
Men’s Bible Class
We will discuss
“WHAT IS SUNDAY
GOOD FOR’’
NEXT SUNDAY
M. E. Church
9:45 A. M.
PATRONIZE EMERALD ADVERTISERS
Meet Me at “TheRendezvous”
LOTI’LL BE THRILLED!
The THRILL of LOVE
Amid a Tempest of Revolt—
MARSHALL NEILAN’S
Great Production
NEW
SHOW
TODAY
“The
Rendezvous”
with
Continuous
1 to 11 P. M.
*
Now
Playing
Conrad Nagel, Sydney Chaplin
Lucille Ricksen, Elmo Lincoln
A throbbing drama of romance and adventure—replete
with laughter, thrills, pathos and compelling emotion.
IT’S A TRIUMPH OF THE SCREEN!
Also
Fighting
Blood
Comedy
And
ROSNER
on the
ORGAN
Come Tonight to “The Rendezvous”
YOU’LL BE THRILLED!
January Clearance Sale!
Eugene’s Largest Piece Goods
Section Offers Notable Values.
$2.1 9 and $2.39
Taffeta Silks, Yard, $1.69
Soft rustling taffetas in sevarl weights
and approximately a dozen shades from
which to select.
$2.50 Wool Poiret
Twill, Yard $1.98
The material for all xises is Poiret Twill,
and a lovely material it is. Also Serges,
Tricotine, etc., comprise this special sell
ing. Dark blue, black and other good
shades; 46 to 56 inches wide.
To $4.75 Wool
Skirtings, Yard, $2.98
Consisting of cheery plaid, stripes and
checks; 54 and 56 inches wide. Splendid
quality.
To $2.95 Sport
Woolens, Yard, $1.98
Again, January Clearance Sale is making
itself noticeable in the woolen goods sec
tion. Colorful patterns you’ll like.
Milady’s Fashionable Strap Wrist Fabric Gloves
Are Scoring a Big Hit—Priced Less
$1.25 Values, Pair, 9Sc $1.50 Values, Pair, $1.25
$2.00 Values, Pair, $1.75
Keep Fit
Fresli milk is a brain and tissue build
er. We will deliver to your door pure
milk, scientifically pasteurized. Phone
your order to 638.
Eugene Farmers Creamery
t