Oregon daily emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1920-2012, April 20, 1923, Page 4, Image 4

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    MATCHES BOOKED
FOB RIFLE TEAMS
_ %
Both Men and Women Com
pete in Contests During
This Month
The following teams, selected in their
order of standing in the ninth corps
area rifle match, are designated to
intercollegiate team match to be held
represent this corps area in the national
intercollegiate team match to be held
between April 15 and May 15, 1923.:
Oregon Agricultural College, first
team; Oregon Agricultural College, sec
ond team; University of Nevada; Ore
gon Agricultural College, third team;
University of Oregon, first team; Uni
versity of Washington; University of
Oregon, second team.
These teams are selected on the basis
of the scores they made in competition
against 28 rifle teams representing the
colleges and universities of the west
coast. Of the eight teams selected, five
are from the state of Oregon. The Uni
versity of Oregon will be able to have
only one team fire, as several members
of the second team have either with
drawn from school or did not return
for the spring term.
The following men are members of
the first team: O. J. Beatty, L. B. Blak
npy, E. A. Britts, W. E. Buchanan, A.
B. Dorsey, Frank DeSpain, Rupert Gil
bert, S. S. Smith, W. C. Hayden, J. M.
Larson, Ted Mays, Robert McKnight,
Thomas N. Page, Joe Peak, E. Robinett,
Ralph Van Walters.
These men are to report as follows
to fire their record scores:
April 16 to 21—Prone and standing.
April 23 to 28—Prone and kneeling.
April 30 to May 5—Prone and sit
ting.
It is requested by the military de
partment that this firing be done as
early in the week as possible.
The girls’ rifle team has scheduled
a three-way match for the week ending
April 21 against the O. A. C. girls ’ team
and the girl’s team of Northwestern
University. All four positions will be
fired using national rifle association
targets.
The team members are: Wave Ander
son, Ruth Gregg, Bessie Holts, Emily
Houston, Lola Keizur, Katlirine Kress
man, Edna Largent, Pearl Lewis. Pal
oma Randleman, Catherine Sartain,
Margaret Seymour, Wanda Templeton,
Mable Johnson, Leona Woods, Elsie
Houck, Frances Rose.
The Oregon girl’s team fired two
matches during the winter term, win
ning both of them. The scores were:
University of Tennessee, 402, U. of O.,
407; Utah Agricultural "Collogo, 2492,
U. of O. 2522.
The men’s team has fired 23 matches,
winning 18 and losing five.
ALL CLASSES MAY HAVE
ONE DAY FOR ELECTIONS
Presidents Think Plan Will Bring
Greater Vote and Promote Interest;
Decision Will be Made by Classes
Spring term ami general student body
election brings the question of class
elections. Heretofore eueh class lias
had its election of officers at individ
ual meetings on different days with a
result that only a small percentage of
the classes vote. This year all the pres
ent class officers are in favor of set
ting aside one day for all class elec
tions.
Jimmy Meek, president of the junior
class, is in favor of making nominations
Tuesday or Wednesday following Jun
ior Week-end and holding elections the
•lay after nominations, lie said it
Would be impossible for the junior
class to change officers before junior '
week because all preparations would be!
underway and the program would have!
to be carried out by the same officers. |
Meek is very desirous to have the one j
day election system and believesWt will
CLASSIFIED ADS
Minimum charge, 1 time, 25c; 2 time*,
16c; 6 times, $1. Must be limited to 6
line*, over this limit, 6c ner line. Phone
051. or leave cony with Business office of
ECuKKAU), in University Pros*. Payment
In advance. Office hours, 1 to 4 p. m.
LOST—Silver Kvershnrp pencil, ini
tials, A. P. V., on barrel. Phone Anna
F. Vogel, 1307. 267-A20-2v
LOST—Pair of horn-rim glasses be
tween Sigma Chi house and Men’s gym.
Hinder please call Fred Carlberg, 565.
2t.
LOST —Pair of horn-rim glasses be
tween Sigma Chi house and Men’s gym.
Finder please call Fred Carlberg, 565.
265 A-111-20.
LOST—Fountain pen, Shaeffer clip,
between library and Deady hall, Tues
day. Finder please call 1206-Y.
263-A19-20.
REMEMBER -That when you want
to go on a picnic or out pigging you
can hire a ear without a driver at .Ten
sen’s Garage. Phone 515. 268-A-20
AGENTS WANTED -$20.00 to
$10.00 per day to hustlers, selling the
Lincoln gear shift for Ford ears; fast
est seller ever put on market; wonder
ful on hills and mountains. Ladies sell
them easy as men. Put on in 20 min
utes. Lasts a life-time. Sells for
$5.00 to Ford owners. Send $3.00 for
sample and our proposition on territory.
COAST SUPPLY COMPANY, 1330 Cal
ifornia Ave., Long Beach, California.
266-A20.
promote interest and class cooperation.
Ed Tapfer, sophomore president, ex
pressed his willingness for one election
day. He thinks it would be good to
hold the elections .just after the main
student body elections because every
body will have a lot of spirit. He
thinks with a system of this sort more
people will turn out to vote and more
interest will be shown.
Eugene Richmond, freshman presi
dent, favors the plan and is willing
to hold elections on any convenient day
for all the classes.
The three presidents are planning to
meet soon and decide on a convenient
date if the classes desire such a plan.
STETSON HAT IS TO BE
AWARDED FOR BEST AJ)
Advertising Contest Announced By
Wade Bros., Eugene, for Series
of Articles of Clothing
“Who will win the Stetson?” Some
handsome senior or some junior looking
ahead to next fall when rords and a
sombrero will sit together on the Sen
ior bench? All that it takes to win
the big hat is to write an advertisement
that is better than all the others and
then go down to Wade Bros., Eugene,
and collectl
This contest is open to all and
this is the first of a series of arti
cles to be given by this store to the
best advertisement. The contest
starts at once, the subject for the first
ad being Stetson hats. The winner of
each week’s contest will receive the
article advertised, and the prize win
ning ad will appear in each Tuesday
morning’s Emerald. All copy must be
in the hands of Professor W. F. G.
Thaclier of the School of Journalism,
by Friday, April 20.
The judges will be Professor Thacher,
Wade Bros., and a third member of the
faculty, as yet unnamed. Following
the hat ad will be advertisements on
Manhattan shirts, Vassar underwear,
Cheney cravats and others, one every
week.
DANCE CONTEST RIVALS
THE OLD MARATHON
(Continued from page one.)
certain number of partners have given
up the grind.
Naturally we want a record that
would stand for some time. As it is
now a record breaker goes to sleep
after his exploit and pounds the pil
lows for two or three days and by the
time he wakes again, his record has
been smashed several times and he
wakes up forgotten.
If you have long distance terpsiehor
ean aspirations, break out all your
peddle concealers and got in trim as
the mania may strike sooner or later, j
ELSIE FERGUSON AT HEILIG
The title of Elsie Ferguson’s play,
“The Wheel of Life,” is derived from
the Buddhist wheel of life to which,
according to their philosophy, all are
bound and from which escape is pos
sible only by conquering the illustions
of life. The play, comes to the Heilig
next Tuesday.
TODAY and SATURDAY
DIRECT FROM ITV
TRIUMPHANT RUN ON
^BROADWAY
mi
WILLIAM FOR
priiinte/'
The world’s most stupendous
and beautiful picture.
Prices—Matinee . 30c
Night—Floor .50c
Baloony .30c
Coming—
HAROLD LLOYD
in “SAFETY LAST
V.
ENUS
PENCILS.
CVlwfxlia, Qaltff
pcncdinttu hwU
U'OR the student or prof., the
-*■ superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
220 Fifth Avc.
Writ., for
booklet on
Volt’s Pencils and
Venus Kvkk pointed
Mechanical Pencils
ELEVEN SENIORS PLEDGE
FOR GLASS MEMORIAL
$10 Installments Are Received
For Student Union
Eight more $10 installments have
been received by the committee in
charge of the Senior class memorial
fund making the total of 11 pledges
received since the cards were mailed
the latter part of last week. These
seniors who have already filed their
pledge cards are: George Robert Goeh
nour, John M. MacGregor, Claire H.
Keeney, T. S. Thompson, H. V. Simpson,
Margaret A. Scott, Aulie J. Anderson,
Wave Lesley, Alice E. Tomkins, George
King, Mary A. Parkinson, Joseph C.
Olsen, Ralf Couch and Gertrude E.
Tolle.
Although the first installment on the
$100 pledge is not due in cash until
January 1, 1924, T. S. Thompson in
closed a check for the amount with his
pledge card.
The fund which will be realized from
these pledges will be used for the es
tablishment of a.student union on the
university campus. The plan to es
tablish this fund as a memorial for
the class of ’23 was passed upon at a
meeting of the class held last term.
Although there are approximately 364
more members of the class to be heard
from yet it is expected that most, if
not all, of the pledges will be received
by the committee within a very short
time.
The committee in charge of the fund
is: John M. MacGregor, chairman; Imo
gene Letcher, Owen Callaway, Flor
ence Garrett and Bernice Altstock.
PLANS FOR PROPOSED
DRIVEWAY PROGRESSING
New Road Along Railway Track Will
Be Built at Once if Right of Way
la Granted by S. P.
Arrangements for the proposed drive
way on the north end of the campus
between University street and Eleventh
avenue are progressing, according to
Mr. Fisher, University superintendent
of grounds and buildings. Southern
Pacific officials are coming here in a
few days to take up the matter and
it is hoped that arrangements can be
made with them that will enable the
University to use about 15 feet of
their right of way.
This right of way could only be ob
tained from the Southern Pacific sub
ject to its policy which makes right of
ways granted in this manner revok
able at any time. Strong hopes are
held, however, for a successful deal
with the railroad company, Mr. Fisher
said.
If this space along the railroad tracks
can be obtained it will be possible to
construc t a driveway between Univer
sity street and Eleventh avenue that
will provide ample room for two cars
to pass. One of the best features of
this road will be the elimination of con
gestion on University street. Many
people drive down this street who are
not aware that it is closed and as a
result the traffic confusion is consid
erable.
Definite plans have been completed
for the other walks and driveways to be
constructed and work on them will com
mence within a few weeks. The road
along the railway tracks will also be
constructed right away if the South
ern Pacific officials agree to the pro
posals.
FRANK JUE RETURNS
Frank Jue, ex-’21, has returned to
the campus, after an absence of two
years, to take special work in voice,
under John B. Siefert. Jue has an
especially fine tenor voice, and while
on the campus was prominent in musi
cal activities. He is a charter member
of Phi Mu Alpha, men’s honorary mus
ical fraternity, and for two years, he
was soloist with the University sym
phony orchestra.
Get the Classified Ad habit.
Type and Ink
D0 not make good printing.
If these were all that are em
ployed, printing would be
nothing but a mechanical
effort—and the result from
every standpoint wholly un
satisfactory. But creative
and artistic talent enters in
—as it always does in our
shop—and makes for a pro
duct which can hardly fail to
satisfy.
Brodie & Co.
A Printing Concern
of Good Taste
26 W. 7th Ave. Phone 363
Young Men’s
New Style
SUITS
FRIDAY and SATURDAY SPECIALS
$18.50, $25, $27.50, $29.50
The HUB
Clothing and Shoe Store
8th and Olive
For Best Service
Shave and Hair Cut
55c
Shave .20c
Hair Cut .35c
Terminal Barbers
7th and Olive
(Central Stage Terminal)
It makes a pic
nic on lawn
or table.
Williams7
Bakery
l
House
Builders
Hardware for service and
attractiveness increases the
value of your building.
Glass knobs and solid brass
make a very pretty trim.
But locks, nails and sash
weights are only a part of
your needs.
We carry a good line of
building papers, felt and
roofings; also Sherwin
Williams paints, varnishes
and enamels.
QUACKENBUSN’S
160 Ninth Avenue East
HURRY
HURRAY
NEW SHOW TODAY
7ANE GREYS
most powerful picture f/j. j
Musically
Wurlitzerized
by
ROSNER
the Music Master
on Our
Wurlitzer
Supreme
And—FOR FUN!
LARRY SEMON
in “A PAIR OF KINGS”
Surprise
Ahead
Peanut Brittle Special
Peanut Brittle Special, a
pleasant surprise for the
house that has a manager
wise enough to order it.
(jj You, who have lived
through the monotony of the
week day menu, demand the
special for a change. Pea
nut Brittle Ice Cream costs
no more than the plain, so
house hills won’t go up.
Have your house manager
call 1480 and order this good
special.
Eugene Fruit Growers Ass’n.
RED CROSS POISON OAK
REMEDY gives immediate re
lief. At Red Cross Drug Co.
only.
PERMANENT WAVING done
by the Nestle Lanoil Method.
Done at your own home. Call
MARGIE
Phone 1245-Y
Found at Last—
A place you will always want to come to
for good food expertly prepared.
Try Our
Merchants’ Lunch
35c
IMPERIAL LUNCH
FRED GEROT, Proprietor
Phone 579 727 Willamette
The Groceteria
Phone 25748 East 9th Street
Special Prices on Heinz Goods During
Demonstration This Week
3 Large Bottles Tomato Ketchup . . . .85c
6 Small Tins Baked Beans.60c
6 Medium Tins Baked Beans .. ... . . . 85c
6 Large Tins Baked Beans.$1.40
6 Medium Tins Spaghetti.. . . .$1.05
A good time to buy your Luncheon Goods
The Groceteria
Phone 257