Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, March 06, 1920, Page 2, Image 2

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    OREGON EMERALD
Official student paper of the Univer
sity of Oregon, published every Tues
day, Thursday and Saturday fo the
college year by the Associated Stu
dents.
Entered In the postoffice at Eugene,
Oregon, as second class matter.
Subscription rates tl.50 per year.
By term, i .60. Advertising rates upon
application.
DOROTHY DUNIWAY, Acting Editor
Lyle Bryson. News Editor
Nell Warwick.Asst. News Editor
Harry A. Smith.Managing Editor
Helen Manning.Dramatic Editor
Esther Fell .Society Editor
Editorial Writers
Earle Richardson Adelaide Lake
Stanley Eisman
Maybelle Leavitt .Proof Reader
Special Writers
Adelaide V. Lake Louise Davis
Victoria Case
Reporters
Earle Richardson, Ariel Dunn, Ja
cob Jacobson, Charles Gratke, Mary
Lou Burton, Eleanor Spall, Stanley
Eisman, Annamay Bronaugh, Eunice
Zimmerman, Frances Quisenberry,
Wanna McKinney, Mauno Loa Fallls,
Floyd Maxwell and Mildred Weeks.
Business Manager
WARREN KAYS
Elston Ireland - Circulation
Floyd Bowles .Assistant
Albert H, Woertendyke.Adv- Mgr.
Assistants
Raymond Vester, Betty Epping, Web
ster Ruble, Ruth Nash, Lee Culbert
son.
The Emerald desires that all sub
scribers get their paper regularly and
on time. All circulation complaints
should be made to the circulation man*
ager. His house phone Js 186._
PHONES
Editor . 204
BuxincHS Manager . 4S4-L
CumpuN Office . 656
City Office .1816 or 108
EARLY COMMENCEMENT EXER
CISES
The senior class In Its unanimous
Indorsement of the plan to hold gra
duation exereisos while the Univer
sity Is in full session, has gone on
record as favoring ceremonies which
really mean what they are supposed
to. Many in the class have had the
experience of wishing to remain for
the graduation of friends in former
years, hut have either felt they could
not spare the tinio after their own
class work was over, or have been
forced to leave before the complete
ceremony was finished. They also
know that graduation in the past
has not meant what it might to many
if all their University friends had
been present.
The seniors of any Institution
should ho above the very childish
wish of having class work end early
just to escape that much of regular
duty. The seniors of Oregon have j
declared that thoy do favor the pro
posed plan for what it means in;
lightened duties. They feel it is a
custom which will make graduation
mean more to every class which
leaves the institution and they do not
think it will seriously interfere with
the regular routine of tiro Univer
sity. A few days more or less at
the end of 1<’> years of school and
university work means very, very lit
tle in terms of hooks and lessons, yet
it may mean a great deal in the lives
and memories of those who are part
ing witli unviersity life forever.
Sometimes we feel that sentiment
plays a very small part in our lives
today, and yet if we deny it we deny
one of the finest qualities we have. |
Graduation means very little if it is
to he a ceremony enacted before emp
ty seats, yet it will mean a very
great deal to each one of us if we
can look hack on it as a time when
friends and relatives were with us,
and when the folks from home really
had an opportunity to see and meet
those who have made our years at
the University so worth while.
If the proposed "Oregon-O" amend
ment goes through, aspirants will
realize what winning an Oregon “O”
means. Hill Hayward said something
about it last term when the student
body saw the football team off.
The fellows who were not asked
to the sophomore hard times party
all had a "hard time" getiug there.
As for costumes, many of them chang
ed their entire minds, when it came
to going.
One cadet iu the It. O. T. C. is a
perfect shot. This is remarkable
considering the fact that most of
them have not even yet learned to
tire blank cartridges.
The leap year dance has been
postponed until the spring term
Plenty of time for those who got a
late start to get busy.
Considerable Interest was shown in
tlie R. O. T. C. training camp at the
Presidio until the cadets found out
the rising hour in the morning.
;
TAXPAYERS’ LEAGUE
GIVES EMIT •
TO MILEAGE TIG BILL
-
—
Lower Assessment Organization
Favors Appropriations For ^
Education
The State Taxpayers’ league of
Oregon is in favor of the millage tax
for the three higher educational in
stitutions of the state, and passed
resolutions endorsing it at a meet
ing of that body in Portland last
Saturday. This is an association of
Oregon citizens who have leagued
to keep taxes down, and it was
through their efforts that the 6%
limitation amendment was put
through.
It is highly advantageous to the
millage bill cause, according to Karl
Onthank, executive secretary, that
these men not only have not dis
approved of it, but have gone on re
cord as favoring it.
“We appreciate their endorsement,”
said Mr. Onthank, “and it is one of
the most important things that has
happened in the campaign so far. We
will not have their opposition to this
measure. They have gone on record
as approving it. This organization
finds the need of supporting the high
er educational institutions of the
state to a high degree of efficiency.”
The resolutions passed by the
league, follow in part:
"Whereas, the special session of
the legislature caused to be sub
mitted to the people bills recom
mending the increase of the millage
tax for the maintenance of our three
state educational institutions; there
fore, be it
“Resolved, That the State Taxpay
ers’ league indorse said bills and re
commend their adoption at the com
ing election; be it further
“Resolved, That we go on record as
in favor of increasng the millage tax
for the education of the sailors, sol
diers and marines of the world war;
be it further
“Resolved, That our educational in
stitutions be encouraged in every
way possible by the contribution of
good and sufficient funds for their'
proper maintenance to better enable j
them to teach pure and unadulterated
Americanism.”
COAST CHAMPIONSHIP IN
DEBATE WON BY OREGON
(Continued from page 1)
closed shop question against C. G.
Crobaugh of San Jose and Paul E.
Erickson of Fresno. The vote of the
judges was 2-1 in favor of the boys
from Oregon. The University of
Washington, upholding the affirma-'
tive of the closed shop question
against Sanford’s negative at Seat
tle, won a unanimous decision over
the team from the south.
In characterizing the debate held in
Villard hall, Professor R. W. Prescott, j
who has charge of all debaters at
Oregon, said that Oregon did not have
the debate won until the final re
buttal.
Washington Delivery Better*
Throughout the whole debate both
sides had worked up to within a foot
of each other’s argument but some
way, said Professor Prescott, both
sides seemed to avoid the clash. The
team representing Washington had
Oregon beaten on delivery, was the
opinion of Professor Prescott.
Oregon paved her way to victory in
the south against Stanford by show
ing that closed shop would give labor
a monopoly and a potential weapon
over non-union men, employer and the
general public; a weapon never to
be given any group of laborers, unless
it should be used to secure justice,
or unless at the same time the group
can be trusted to use it with meder
aion.
Information was received from Palo
Alto through there distinct sources,
including Stanford’s debate manager,
confirming Oregon’s victory at Stan
ford by a 2-1 vote of the judges. Re
ports published in the morning pa
pers were erroneous in announcing
Stanford as the winner.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA •
announces the pledging of •
REGINALD A. GUSTAFSON •
of Portland, Oregon. •
DELTA THETA PHI •
announces the election of •
J. ARTHUR BERG •
■X BILlV DEPARTMENT STORE
Royal Society Package Goods for Spring
are Here
The quality and values in ltoyal
Society package outfits are
maintained under all conditions,
creating a standard of excel
lence that insures beauty and
service through usage and laun
dering. Every package contains
the stamped article to be em
broidered, either made up or
ready for making, and sufficient
floss to complete the embroid
ery. See the beautiful new fin
ished pieces now on display.
Baronette Satin $7.50 A Yard
New Spring fabrics of incomparable beauty and quality. Such ricli
colorings and exquisite lustrous finish are seldom seen. This is an
extra quality, richly finished, shown in beautiful colors, including
Sapphire, Kingfisher, Alice, Navy, Old Hose, Copen, Doe, Taupe,
lUack and White.
Trade at Jackson’s
15)7 W. EIGHTH AVE. PHONE 945
\o v
Groceries, Flour and Feed
WHERE YOU GET MORE FOR YOUR MONEY
FREE DELIVERIES TWICE DAILY
!
Utah Wants to Debate O. A. C.
The University of Utah has offered
:o pay the cost of sending teams to
Corvallis if O. A. C. will accept their !
lebate challenge.
LOST—A Phi Delta Theta pin. Ini
tials F. H. ’23 on back. Phone 127.
Learn to Knit
Prettier and
More Useful
Tilings
The new Minerva Knit
ting Manual has over 100
suggestions for making
beautiful, practical gar
ments and articles for the
home. Price 35c.
As to
MINERVA i ARNS
You’ve no idea of the sat
isfaction there is in work
ing with these richly col
ored, strong, lofty, quality
worsted yarns. Let us
show you how smoothly
the ball uncoils — how
readily we can match Min
erva shades—also convinc
ing evidence of their prac
ticability for every sort of i
knitting.
Ask about Minerva at
our Yarn Department —
today.
Minerva Yarns sold ex- |
clusively by
McMorran &
Washburne
Women’s Building Benefit Dance
and Band Concert
ARMORY-Friday 12th
by ELK’S Band
Admission - - - 25c
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Favorite Resort of U. of O. Students
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IT’S NO USE TALKING
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to Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry.
The University of Oregon Students are fast
realizing the truth about
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The fact that we have the right kind of prices and
deliver the goods which warrant satisfaction.
Come in and talk over your Jewelry troubles with
DIAMOND MERCHANT and JEWELER