Oregon emerald. (Eugene, Or.) 1909-1920, January 08, 1918, Page Three, Image 3

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    DA. BERTHA STI1T
IS OFF FOR FRANCE
Former Woman’s Physical Di
rector to Take Up Work
With Children’s
Bureau.
Frieda Goldsmith to Be Head of
Department at Reed
College.
Dr. rJertha Stuart, formerly head of
the department of physical training for
women at the University, and since 1916
physical director *for women at Reed
College, is now on her way to Paris,
where she will start work at her new
post in the children’s bureau of the
American Red Cross
Dr. Stuart was the University’s first
woman physical director, comiDg to
Oregon in 1909, when the women's de
partment of physical instruction was
created. She remained here for seven
years prior to her appointment at Reed.
Is Michigan Graduate.
Miss Harriet Thomson, assistant in
the department, was a classmate of Dr.
Stuart’s at the University of Michigan.
“Dr. Stuart was graduated from
Michigan in 1902,” said Miss Thomson.
“She then took a four-year medical
course at that institution, getting a doc
tor’s degree in 1906- She was for two
years an instructor at Michigan before
•he came to Oregon.”
■While the primary aim of Dr. Stuart
in her work in Europe will be to give
medical care to French children, she
will probably find a broad field in many
parts of the devastated sections. Be
sides her experience at Michigan and
Oregon, she has had work at the Uni
' versity of California, and clinical prac
tice at the Waverly Baby Home.
Miss Goldsmith Advances.
Miss Frieda Goldsmith, a University
graduate, and an assistant in the Phy
sical Training Department here from
1914 to 1917. has been named to as
sume the duties of Dr. Stuart at Reed
during the latter's absence. Miss Gold
smith has been an assistant in the de
partment at Reed this year.
ORDNANCE MEN PROMOTED
Three Former University Students Re
ceive Non-Commissioned Rating.
Joseph Hedges, Henry Trowbridge
and Kieth Kiggins. all members of the
first ordnance class, have been made
sergeants, according to word received
by friends in Eugene. Twenty-five of
the 50 men were given a non-commis
sioned rating, and they were among the
lucky ones.
They are to be stationed in the ord
nance department of the training camp
at Des Moines, la., for the present. Up
to now they have been at San Antonio,
Tex.
ANOTHER GRAD IS MARRIED
George Wilcox, ex-’l9, Weds Marie Mor
rison at Grass Valley.
George Wilcox, a student at the Uni
versity last year, was married Decem
ber 26, to Marie Morrison, at Grass
Vaiiey, according to word received by
his friends here.
Wilcox was a law student while
in the University. His bride was a for
mer student at the Monmouth normal.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Phone 243-J.
C. B. MARKS, M. D.
Specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and Tnroat
masses uorrectiy Mtted
Office, Brown Bldg. Eugene, Ore.
OR. M. C. HARRIS
Dentist
Room 402 C. & W. Bldg., Sth and WU
lanrttte Eugene, Ore.
DR W. B. LEE
Dentist
Room 404 C. & W. Bldg., cot. Sth
and Willamette Sts.
Honrs 7 A. M. to 6 P. M. Phone 155
W. P. BAGLEY
Doctor of Magnetic Healing and Sug
gestive Therapeutics
Treats all acute and chronic diseases.
Matlock Bldg., room 4, Eigth and Wil
lamette Sts. Eugene, Ore.
DR. MILLER
Dentistry
204 Brown Bldg. Cor. 9th and Oak
Office Hours: Phone 531
9 to 12 A. M.
1 to 5 P. M.
OR. L. L. BAKER
Dentist
Instructor’s diploma N. U. D. S., Chicago
Office 310 C. & W. Bldg., 8th and
Willamette Sts., Eugene, Ore.
DR. R. T. BURNETT
Dentist
Phone 769-R. ' Office, White Temple
MADAME SHEFFER
Modern Hair Dressing Parlors
Prices Reasonable
Ofer Price Shoe Store
Phone 8S8
Try
“Root
Beer
Creamed”
In a Big Sfein
At the
Peter Pan
SPALDING EQUIPMENT
FOR OUTDOOR WIN
TER SPORTS.
Skates and Shoes,
Hockey Supplies,
Skiis, Sweaters,
Jerseys.
The Spalding line
affords you the wid
est range of selection
with a guarantee that
every article will give
satisfaction and ser
M-l'. """■ "*
A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
Broadway at Alder.
Catalogue on request,
SURGICAL DRESSING WORK
BEGUN BY FIFTEEN GIRLS
Small Number in Attendance Due to
Fact That Definite Schedules
Were Not Arranged.
Although few in numbers, there was
no lack in the enthusiasm of the women
who met at the Y. W- C. A. Bungalow
for the first work on surgical dressings,
Monday afternoon.
The small number was attributed to
the fact that the schedules for the work
had not yet been arranged, and many
people did not realize that the work
actually began at 1 o’clock on Monday.
Those who were there, however, gained
a definite knowledge of the work, and
those in charge were quite satisfied
with the output, considering the fact
that there were only 15 workers pres
ent.
About 15 gowns and caps have been
finished and mere are being made under
the supervision of Mrs. A. R. Sweetser.
However, to avoid delay, as many girls
as possible are requested to bring their
! own caps and aprons, for the present. A
I guest towel can be used as the head
l piece, according to instructions. The
| girls are also requested to supply them
! selves with a pair of scissors, to be
used in cutting the dressings.
The work will be held regularly, from
1 till 5, on all scj^ol days esc^pt
Wednesdays, when the hours will be
; from 1 till 3. There will be four in
I structors from the down town head
| quarters there each day, with Miss Myra
j Caief in charge of the work in general.
I Those who were there yesterday were
HiW r'"1"r U-p rT . II—
I Verneta Wright and Mrs. Walter
| Griffith.
Save the food and help the fighter
fight.
FIVE BEZOEK STARS I
MENTIONED BY CAMP
Beckett Named on First All
American Service Eleven;
Mitchell Choice for
Second Team.
Holden and Snyder Placed on
Third; Steers One of Nine
Best Quarters.
Four former Oregon football stars,
now members of military teams, and Bill
Steers, member of the Varsity squad
during the past season, are among the
gridiron stars of the country to receive
mention from Walter Camp, dean of
American sport writers.
Johnny Beckett is chosen for a place
on the mythical all-star service eleven.
Beckett, who was captain of the Oregon
Varsity in 1916,.has this year been play
ing as captain of the Mare Island Ma
rines, which won a 19-7 victory over
Camp Lewis at the Pasadena Tourna
ment of Roses, New Year's day.
“Brick” Mitchell, former Oregon end,
is chosen for the second all-American
service eleven. “Brick” is also a mem
ber with eckett on the Mare Island
Marines team.
Two More Oregonians Named.
“Bill" Holden and “Bill” Snyder are
former Bezdek stars selected by Camp
for places on the third all-American.
Both played on the 91st division team
of Camp Lejjvis.
In making the selection of the college
stars, Camp did not form first, second
and third teams as usual, merely giving
his selection of the best for the respec
tive positions- The only Oregon man
selected was Bill Steers, who is men
tioned as one of the best of the nine
all-star quarterbacks. Other western
players mentioned in this division are
Creswell, of Occidental, and Mallette,
of the University of Southern California.
Walker, of the Oregon Aggies, was
selected among the tackles, as was (Tor
don, of California. Stites, of Washing
ton State, was among those mentioned
for guards.
Hanson, the University of California
center, whose sickness caused Oregon to
defeat California, according to Coach
Andy Smith, was selected among seven
others as the best, centers in the country.
Washington Staters Prominent.
In the backfield, Newman, of O. A. C.,
Banks, of Washington State, Boone,
also of Washington State, and Murphy,
of the University of Washington, are
the western representatives.
There was a marked lack of individual
stars among the colleges last year, owing
to the heavy drain upon football mate
rial made by enlistments. Guyon, of
Georgia Tech, was the one shining light
of the past season. His work has been
classed with that of Mahan and Oliphant
of previous seasons.
SHELDON NEW PRESIDENT
OF OREGON TEACHERS
University Well Represented in Associa
tion Meeting in Portland Dur
ing Holidays.
Dr. Henry D. Sheldon, dean of the
school of education, was elected presi
dent of the Oregon Teachers’ associa
tion, during the Christmas holidays at
a meeting of the association held in
Portland.
Professor Sheldon has been an active
worker in the association for a num
ber of years. He held the office of vice
president during the past year. %
Other •members of the University fac
ulty attending the meeting were Pro
fessor F- S. Dunn, Professor A. H.
Schroff, Dean E. F. Lawrence of the
school of architecture, Dr. E. E. De
Cou, Dr. W. P. Boynton, Professor F.
I,. Stetson, Dr. D. W. De Rusk, E. L.
Kezel, G. E- Ruch, Dr. W. D. Smith,
Dr. E. S. Conklin. All representatives
from the University took part in the
programs of their respective depart
ments.
Attendance at the meeting, according
to Professor Sheldon, was about 2500,
or 300 more than that of last year.
NEW JUDGES ARE SELECTED
Hogue, Smith and Wffitney of Portland
to Mark Architecture Work.
A. H. Smith and IT. A. Whitney, Port
land architects, have been selected by
Dean E. F. Lawrence, of the school of
architecture, in place of Albert Sulton
and Harrison J. Whitton, as judges of
the work of the architecture students
"'-1-i,.,. tv. n-t „f
Chestes Hogue, A. H- Smith and H.
A. Whitney, all practicing architects of
Portland.
i Send the Emerald Home
(Continued from page one)
sorimmage, the first real workout of
tne season- This was followed by hard
practices this afternoon and Monday
between the tentative first and second
squads competing for the Varsity posi- ;
tions. ,
Aggie Games Postponed.
Coach Walker will hold more of these
workouts from this time on, as the sea
son is getting well under way and the
team in a pre-season condition. \ ery
little has been done as yet to secure
teamwork, as most of the effort has
been expended in individual coaching.
The games scheduled with the Oregon
Aggies for the 11th and 12th of this
month have been postponed until the
Sth and Oth of February, thus putting
all conference contests off until next
month. Manager Tiffany is endeavor
ing to schedule a practice game for
January 26, but ns yet has been un
successful. During the middle of Feb
ruary a trip may be taken to Portland,
and thence to Seattle, but final ar
rangements are not completed at the
presert time.
Fifteen in Squad.
A few more recruits have been show
ing tip each day, so that now the squad
numbers about 15. Parsons returned
front vacation on Sunday and turned
out in .uniform last evening, and also
Brandon, a student of last year, made his
appearance yesterday. A good deal of
competition has been shown for the dif
ferent- places, and it is doubtful who will
finally wear the lemon-yellow for the
season.
No word has been heard from Varsity
Coach Bill Hayward, and it is very doubt
ful when he will return from central
Oregon. Dean Walker is taking full
charg.- until the coach returns, and is
doing as much as possible to have the
men it. good condition when Hayward
returns to resume his duties.
EXTRA! BLACK HAND GANG
BUSY ON OREGON CAMPUS
Caesar Is Kidnaped and Held for Ran
som- $100 Check Left for
Mrs. Blackmail.
A blacklvand gong is at work on this
campus. Saturday night was a very
successful evening for the "gang.” They
succeeded in forcing the payment of
$100, in signed check, when Caesar was
kidnapped aud held for ransom.
Caesar is the Kappa Sigma dog. Be
ing an old resident on the campus,
Caesar is an ardent believer and sup
porter of the Oregon spirit and democ
racy, so he went around with his fra
ternity to open house at the sororities.
Saturday night,
Caesar visited several houses. Every
thing went well, and he had a good
time. Then the boys took him to re
new friendships and meet the new
pledges at the Gamma I’hi house.
While some of the other Kappa Sigs
were being taken to cosy corners.
Caesar, it now develops, was lured to
a closet and locked in for keeps- And
the Kappa Sigs went off, not noticing
his absence.
At 11 o’clock a messenger called on
the Kappa Sigs. lie had a huge paste
board message. It read:
‘‘Caesar is held for ransom. Leave
$100 on the Gamma Phi porch or he will
be cremated. (Signed): Blackhand.”
A delegation of Caesar’s friends hur
ried over and left on the Gamma Phi
porch a check calling for the payment
of $100 to ”Mrs. Blackmail.”
And Caesar tore gladly out of the
: Gamma Phi Beta house—with a Gamma
Phi pledge pin.
Caesar contended that the Gamma
Phis had used the third degree in pledg
ing him.
Kappa Sigma now threatens to bring
before the Panhelienic a resolution
which, because of the third degree
worked on Caesar, would bar the Gamma
Phis from pledging any more dogs foi
one semester.
♦♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦
♦ TORCH AND SHIELD
♦ Announce the election of
♦ ROBERT CO SO RIFF
♦ JOHN MASTERSON
♦ EDWIN WARD
♦ GEORGE BEGGS
♦ FLOYD ELLIS
♦ MERLE BLAKE
♦ EDWIN OXMAN
♦ FRANZJACOBBERGER
♦ EDWIN DURNO
♦ WILLIAM HOLLENBECK
T—HXVf jot)”
| ♦ LYLE BAIN
♦ RICHARD ADAMS
♦ DON ROBINSON
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Girls! Wear a
Service Pin
For That Friend in the
U. S. Service
Or if any members of your family are in the service,
wear a service pin for each of them also.
SINGLE STAR PINS ...25*
Luckey’s Jewelry Store
X
Imperial Hotel
At Broadway, Stark and Washington.
X
| Should be designated as our favorite meeting place and
| Our Official Headquarters
y
X In Portland, Oregon. 2 dining rooms #
l
Y with table d’hote meals from 25c up
T
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| — TRY — I
I
| Eggiman’s Candy Kitchen
For Good Candies and Ice Cream.
$ Springfield.
x
4th and Main Streets. $
X
•:“W"X,,:“X“X,,;"X”X“X,'X“X“:i;X"X,,Xm!"X"X"X"X~M“X“»,X"K,*:',k,<-X’
Don’t Forget The
MARX BARBER SHOP
729 Willamette.
DUNN’S
BAKERY
— For —
GOOD THINGS
TO EAT.
Phone 72. 36 9th Ave. E.
inan^N
t
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♦
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THE OR EG AN A
The Student Shop.
ICE CREAM
LUNCHES
CANDIES :
£ Near The Campua. Phone 928. \ |
£>^>^xx-x~x~xk-xkkx~x*%~x~:~x**x~x~x~x**x~x-x~x~x~x~X“X^
Maxwell Jitney
—Phone 114—
STUDEBAKERS, DODGES, OVERLANDS, SAXONS
The All Night Service.